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Number of mayors of St. Louis by party affiliation[A]
Party Mayors
Democratic 23
Republican 13
Whig 7
Independent 3
Know Nothing 2
Emancipation 1

The mayor of St. Louis, Missouri is the chief executive officer of St. Louis' government. The mayor has a duty to enforce city ordinances and the power to either approve or veto city ordinances passed by the board of alderman.[1]

The mayor originally served a one-year term until 1859 when a new city charter changed the term length to two years.[2] The office was changed to its present four-year term after adoption of the Charter and Scheme in 1876 which separated the City of St. Louis from St. Louis County.[3] The mayor is not term limited.

If the office of mayor becomes vacant through death, resignation, recall, or removal by the board of alderman, the president of the board of alderman becomes mayor until a special mayoral election can be held; if the office is only temporarily vacant due to disability of the mayor, the president only acts out the duties of mayor. Should both offices be vacant, the vice-president of the board of alderman becomes mayor.[1]

Forty-five individuals have held the office of mayor of St. Louis, four of whom—William Carr Lane, John Fletcher Darby, John Wimer, and John How—served non-consecutive terms. The most terms served by a mayor was by Lane who served 8 full terms plus the unexpired term of Darby. The longest serving mayor was Henry Kiel who took office April 15, 1913 and left office April 21, 1925, a total of 12 years and 6 days over three terms in office. Two others—Raymond Tucker, and Vincent C. Schoemehl—also served three terms as mayor, but served seven fewer days. The shortest serving mayor was Arthur Barret who died 11 days after taking office. The current mayor is Francis G. Slay, who took office April 17, 2001. His third term will expire April 16, 2013.

Contents

Mayors

St. Louis was incorporated as a city on December 9, 1822, shortly following the state of Missouri's admission to the Union four months prior. In accordance with its new charter, the city changed its governance to a mayor-council format and elected its first mayor, William Carr Lane, April 7, 1823.[4]

      Independent       Whig       Democratic       Know Nothing       Emancipation       Republican

Nathan Cole, 20th mayor of St. Louis
Henry Kiel, 32nd mayor of St. Louis
# Name Took office Left office Party Terms[B]
1 William Carr Lane April 14, 1823 April 14, 1829 Independent 6
2 Daniel Page April 14, 1829 November 11, 1833 Independent [C]
3 John W. Johnson November 11, 1833 April 14, 1835 Whig [C]
4 John Fletcher Darby April 14, 1835 October 31, 1837 Whig [D]
Wilson Primm October 31, 1837 November 15, 1837 Whig [E]
1 William Carr Lane November 15, 1837 April 14, 1840 Whig
4 John Fletcher Darby April 14, 1840 April 13, 1841 Whig 1
5 John D. Daggett April 13, 1841 April 12, 1842 Whig 1
6 George Maguire April 12, 1842 April 11, 1843 Democratic 1
7 John Wimer April 11, 1843 April 9, 1844 Democratic/Workingmen's 1
8 Bernard Pratte April 9, 1844 April 14, 1846 Whig 2
9 Peter G. Camden April 14, 1846 April 13, 1847 Know Nothing 1
10 Bryan Mullanphy April 13, 1847 April 11, 1848 Democratic 1
11 John Krum April 11, 1848 April 10, 1849 Democratic 1
12 James G. Barry April 10, 1849 April 9, 1850 Democratic 1
13 Luther Martin Kennett April 9, 1850 April 12, 1853 Whig 3
14 John How April 12, 1853 April 10, 1855 Democratic 2
15 Washington King April 10, 1855 April 15, 1856 Know Nothing 1
14 John How April 15, 1856 April 14, 1857 Democratic 1
7 John Wimer April 14, 1857 April 13, 1858 Emancipation 1
16 Oliver Filley April 13, 1858 April 9, 1861 Republican 2[F]
17 Daniel G. Taylor April 9, 1861 April 14, 1863 Union Anti-Black Republican 1
18 Chauncey Filley April 14, 1863 March 19, 1864 Republican ½[G]
Ferdinand W. Cronenbold March 19, 1864 April 11, 1864 [H]
19 James Thomas April 11, 1864 April 13, 1869 Republican
20 Nathan Cole April 13, 1869 April 11, 1871 Republican 1
21 Joseph Brown April 11, 1871 April 13, 1875 War Democrat 2
22 Arthur Barret April 13, 1875 April 24, 1875 Democratic [I][J]
Herman Rechtien April 24, 1875 May 29, 1875 [K]
23 James H. Britton May 29, 1875 February 9, 1876 Democratic [L]
24 Henry Overstolz February 9, 1876 April 19, 1881 Independent 1⅓[L][M]
25 William L. Ewing April 19, 1881 April 21, 1885 Republican 1
26 David R. Francis April 21, 1885 April 16, 1889 Democratic 1
27 Edward A. Noonan April 16, 1889 April 18, 1893 Democratic 1
28 Cyrus Walbridge April 18, 1893 April 20, 1897 Republican 1
29 Henry Ziegenheim April 20, 1897 April 16, 1901 Republican 1
30 Rolla Wells April 16, 1901 April 20, 1909 Democratic 2
31 Frederick Kreismann April 20, 1909 April 15, 1913 Republican 1
32 Henry Kiel April 15, 1913 April 21, 1925 Republican 3
33 Victor J. Miller April 21, 1925 April 18, 1933 Republican 2
34 Bernard F. Dickmann April 18, 1933 April 15, 1941 Democratic 2
35 William D. Becker April 15, 1941 August 1, 1943 Republican ½[I]
36 Aloys P. Kaufmann August 1, 1943 April 19, 1949 Republican [N]
37 Joseph Darst April 19, 1949 April 21, 1953 Democratic 1
38 Raymond Tucker April 21, 1953 April 20, 1965 Democratic 3
39 Alfonso Cervantes April 20, 1965 April 17, 1973 Democratic 2
40 John Poelker April 17, 1973 April 19, 1977 Democratic 1
41 James F. Conway April 19, 1977 April 21, 1981 Democratic 1
42 Vincent C. Schoemehl April 21, 1981 April 20, 1993 Democratic 3
43 Freeman Bosley, Jr. April 20, 1993 April 15, 1997 Democratic 1
44 Clarence Harmon April 15, 1997 April 17, 2001 Democratic 1
45 Francis G. Slay April 17, 2001 Incumbent Democratic 3
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Notes

  • A. ^  45 people have served as mayor, four twice; the table includes these non-consecutive terms as well.
  • B. ^  The fractional terms of some mayors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple mayors served, due to resignations, deaths and the like.
  • C. a b  Samuel Merry was elected mayor of St. Louis in April 1833, however, his eligibility was questioned by the City Council as he was a federal officer—United States Receiver of Public Moneys in St. Louis. Merry filed suit to force the council's compliance and in October 1833, he was ruled ineligible by the Missouri Supreme Court.[5] Johnston was elected mayor in a special mayoral election held a month later on November 9. Page continued to serve as mayor until the case was settled and Johnston elected.[6][7]
  • D. ^  Darby resigned from office. William Carr Lane was later elected to fill the vacancy.[8]
  • E. ^  As president of the Board of Alderman, Primm acted as mayor following the resignation of Darby.[9]
  • F. ^  Oliver Filley's second term was the first mayoral term to last 2 years.[2]
  • G. ^  Chauncey Filley resigned after serving one year of his two year term as mayor due to poor health.[10]
  • H. ^  As president of the Board of Common Council, Cronenbold acted as mayor following the resignation of Chauncey Filley.
  • I. a b  Died in office.
  • J. ^  Barret became suddenly ill and died after only 11 days in office.[11]
  • K. ^  As president of the City Council, Rechtin acted as mayor following the death of Arthur Barret.[12]
  • L. a b  Henry Overstolz was declared defeated by James Britton in the 1875 election, but contested the election and was seated as mayor nine months later after a recount of the ballots.[13]
  • M. ^  Per the new city charter of 1876, Overstolz became the first mayor of St. Louis elected to a four-year term.[3]
  • N. ^  As president of the Board of Alderman, Kaufmann became mayor following the death of William Becker. He was later elected mayor, in a special mayoral election in November 1944, to fill Becker's unexpired term.[14]

Other high offices held

This is a table of governorships, congressional and other federal offices, and ranking diplomatic positions in foreign countries held by St. Louis mayors. All representatives and senators mentioned represented Missouri.

Name Mayoral term Other offices held
William Carr Lane 1823–1829
1837–1840
Governor of New Mexico Territory
John Fletcher Darby 1835–1837
1840–1841
U.S. Representative[15]
Luther Martin Kennett 1850–1853 U.S. Representative[16]
Nathan Cole 1869–1871 U.S. Representative[17]
David R. Francis 1885–1889 Governor of Missouri; U.S. Secretary of the Interior; Ambassador to Russia

Living former mayors

As of September 2008, four former mayors were alive, the oldest being James F. Conway (1977–1981, born 1933). The most recent death of a former mayor was that of John H. Poelker (1973–1977), on February 9, 1990.

Name Mayoral term Date of birth
James F. Conway 1977–1981 June 22, 1933
Vincent C. Schoemehl 1981–1993 October 30, 1946
Freeman Bosley, Jr. 1993–1997 July 20, 1954
Clarence Harmon 1997–2001 1939

References

General
Charters
Specific
  1. ^ a b "St. Louis City Charter, Article VII". St. Louis Public Library. http://www.slpl.lib.mo.us/cco/charter/data/art07.htm. Retrieved 2008-07-23.  
  2. ^ a b "St. Louis Mayors: Oliver D. Filley". St. Louis Public Library. http://exhibits.slpl.org/mayors/data/dt42815532.asp. Retrieved 2008-07-21.  
  3. ^ a b "St. Louis Mayors: Henry Overstolz". St. Louis Public Library. http://exhibits.slpl.org/mayors/data/dt47812949.asp. Retrieved 2008-07-21.  
  4. ^ Conard, Howard Louis (1901). Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri. 1. New York ; Louisville ; St. Louis: The Southern History Company. pp. 569–572. OCLC 32872107. http://books.google.com/books?id=VGsUAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA569.  
  5. ^ State v. Samuel Merry, [1] (Mo. 1833).
  6. ^ "St. Louis Mayors: John W. Johnston". St. Louis Public Library. http://exhibits.slpl.org/mayors/data/dt46613331.asp. Retrieved 2008-09-03.  
  7. ^ Shepard, Elihu Hotchkiss (1870). The Early History of St. Louis and Missouri. Saint Louis: Southwestern Book and Publishing Company. p. 112. OCLC 2804761. http://books.google.com/books?id=vUUVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA112. Retrieved 2008-09-03.  
  8. ^ Stevens, Walter Barlow (1911). St. Louis: The Fourth City, 1764-1911. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co.. p. 112. OCLC 9351989. http://books.google.com/books?id=7D0VAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA112. Retrieved 2008-08-22.  
  9. ^ "Proceedings of the Board of Alderman of the City of St. Louis". Daily Commercial Bulletin and Missouri Literary Register. 1837-12-02.  
  10. ^ "St. Louis Mayors: Chauncey I. Filley". St. Louis Public Library. http://exhibits.slpl.org/mayors/data/dt50576468.asp. Retrieved 2008-07-21.  
  11. ^ Reavis, L. U. (1875). Saint Louis: The Future Great City of the World (Biographical Edition ed.). Saint Louis, MO: Gray, Baker & Co.. pp. 467–470. OCLC 1805694. http://books.google.com/books?id=1T4VAAAAYAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PPA467,M1. Retrieved 2008-07-21.  
  12. ^ "A Municipal Row". The Inter Ocean. 1875-05-19.  
  13. ^ "St. Louis Mayors: James H. Britton". St. Louis Public Library. http://exhibits.slpl.org/mayors/data/dt49584725.asp. Retrieved 2008-07-21.  
  14. ^ "Aloys P. Kaufmann". The New York Times. 1984-02-15. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C05E7D8123BF936A25751C0A962948260&sec=&spon=. Retrieved 2008-07-17.  
  15. ^ "DARBY, John Fletcher". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=D000049. Retrieved 2008-07-02.  
  16. ^ "KENNETT, Luther Martin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=K000119. Retrieved 2008-07-02.  
  17. ^ "COLE, Nathan". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=C000610. Retrieved 2008-07-02.  

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