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Media of Algeria: Wikis

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Algeria has more than 45 independent French-language and Arabic-language publications as well as four government-owned newspapers (two published in French and two in Arabic), but the government controls all printing presses and advertising.[1] The newspapers with the largest circulations are El-Khabar (530,000), Quotidien d’Oran (195,000), and Liberté (120,000); all three are employee-owned.[1] The government also owns all radio and television outlets, which provide pro-government programming.[1] In 2004 and 2005, the government increased the access of Berber language and culture to both print and broadcast media.[1]

Contents

Journalism

Writing in Arabic, English and French, Algerian bloggers cover social, cultural and political topics. There are more than 5,000 Algerian blogs, a newspaper suggested in late 2008.

Algerian dailies mark the anniversary of the introduction of the defamation laws by suspending publication in a protest known as a "day without newspapers". Satellite TV is popular; stations based in France target viewers in Algeria and European channels are widely-watched.

[2]Arabic-language newspapers include Ech-Chorouk El-Youmi[3], El Khabar[4], and El Massa[5]. French-language newspapers include El Watan[6] and El Moudjahid[7]. English-language newspapers include the North Africa Journal[8]. Defunct newspapers include Lisan al-Din (Language of Faith) founded in 1912, and the longer-lived Al-balagh al-jazairi (Algerian Messenger) founded in 1926 by Sufi Ahmad al-Alawi (1869-1934).[citation needed]


According to the CIA The World Fact "the rapid increase in mobile cellular subscribership; in 2008, combined fixed-line and mobile telephone density surpassed 100 telephones per 100 persons. And participant in Medarabtel; satellite earth stations - 51 (Intelsat, Intersputnik, and Arabsat)services link Algeria with most other parts of the world.

Censorship

There is no direct censorship, but laws set out prison terms and fines for insulting or defaming the president, MPs, judges and the army. Media rights bodies have accused the government of using the laws to control the private press.

Algerian dailies mark the anniversary of the introduction of the defamation laws by suspending publication in a protest known as a "day without newspapers".

Algeria's television and radio stations are state-controlled, but there is a lively private press which often criticises the authorities. Satellite TV is popular; stations based in France target viewers in Algeria and European channels are widely-watched. Algeria's television and radio stations are state-controlled, but there is a lively private press which often criticises the authorities.

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Internet

In 2008 Algeria had 897 Internet hosts and 4.1 million internet users

See also

References

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