Medulla oblongata: Wikis

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Brain:
Illu pituitary pineal glands.jpg
Medulla oblongata labeled at bottom left
Gray694.png
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive.
Latin medulla Oblongata
Gray's subject #187 767
Part of Brain stem
NeuroNames hier-695
MeSH Medulla+Oblongata
NeuroLex ID birnlex_957

The medulla oblongata is the lower half of the brainstem. In discussions of neurology and similar contexts where no ambiguity will result, it is often referred to as simply the medulla. The medulla contains the cardiac, respiratory, vomiting and vasomotor centers and deals with autonomic functions, such as breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.

Contents

Anatomy

Medulla oblongata (Animation)
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Two parts: open and closed

The medulla is often thought of as being in two parts:

  • an open part or superior part where the dorsal surface of the medulla is formed by the fourth ventricle.
  • a closed part or inferior part where the metacoel lies within the medulla.

Between the anterior median sulcus and the anterolateral sulcus

The region between the anterior median sulcus and the anterolateral sulcus is occupied by an elevation on either side known as the pyramid of medulla oblongata. This elevation is caused by the corticospinal tract.

In the lower part of the medulla some of these fibers cross each other thus obliterating the anterior median fissure. This is known as the decussation of the pyramids.

Some other fibers that originate from the anterior median fissure above the decussation of the pyramids and run laterally across the surface of the pons are known as the external arcuate fibers.

Between the anterolateral and posterolateral sulci

The region between the anterolateral and posterolateral sulci in the upper part of the medulla is marked by a swelling known as the Olivary body.

It is caused by a large mass of gray matter known as the inferior olivary nucleus.

Between the posterior median sulcus and the posterolateral sulcus

The posterior part of the medulla between the posterior median sulcus and the posterolateral sulcus contains tracts that enter it from the posterior funiculus of the spinal cord. These are the fasciculus gracilis, lying medially next to the midline, and the fasciculus cuneatus, lying laterally.

These fasciculi end in rounded elevations known as the gracile and the cuneate tubercles. They are caused by masses of gray matter known as the nucleus gracilis and the nucleus cuneatus.

Just above the tubercles, the posterior aspect of the medulla is occupied by a triangular fossa, which forms the lower part of the floor of the fourth ventricle. The fossa is bounded on either side by the inferior cerebellar peduncle, which connects the medulla to the cerebellum.

Lower part

The lower part of the medulla, immediately lateral to the fasciculus cuneatus, is marked by another longitudinal elevation known as the tuberculum cinereum.

It is caused by an underlying collection of gray matter known as the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve.

The gray matter of this nucleus is covered by a layer of nerve fibers that form the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve.

Base

The base of the medulla is defined by the commissural fibers, crossing over from the ipsilateral side in the spinal cord to the contralateral side in the brain stem; below this is the spinal cord.

Functions

The medulla oblongata controls autonomic functions, and relays nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord. It is also responsible for controlling several major points and autonomic functions of the body:

  • respiration ----- chemoreceptors
  • cardiac center ----- sympathetic, parasympathetic system
  • vasomotor center---- baroreceptors
  • reflex centers of vomiting, coughing, sneezing and swallowing

Blood supply

Blood to the medulla is supplied by a number of arteries.

Additional images

References

External links


Simple English

File:Illu pituitary pineal
Position of the medulla in humans

The medulla oblongata is the lower, or rear,[1] half of the brainstem. It is often referred to as simply the medulla. It is just in front (or on top) of the spinal cord.

The medulla contains the cardiac, respiratory, vomiting and vasomotor centers and deals with autonomic functions, such as breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.

Functions

The medulla oblongata controls autonomic functions, and relays nerve signals between the brain and spinal cord. It is also responsible for controlling several major points and autonomic functions of the body:

  • respiration – chemoreceptors
  • cardiac center – sympathetic, parasympathetic system
  • vasomotor center – baroreceptors
  • reflex centers of vomiting, coughing, sneezing, and swallowing

Notes

  1. rear in most vertebrates, and lower in man, because of the position of our skull on top of the vertebral column.

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