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Men's spaces refer to separate social and cultural spaces, roles and norms available to men in non-westernized societies. It is the membership of these spaces that determines a male's manhood.[1][2] In certain societies, boys until adolescence live in women's spaces, and they generally had to undergo 'manhood tests' or 'rites of passage into manhood' in order to be initiated into men's spaces.[3][4]

In non-westernized cultures, most traditional spaces are divided into men's spaces, women's spaces and third gender spaces.[5] The entry or participation of women in these men's spaces is highly restricted. Entry of third gendered persons into men's spaces is also regulated, although with more freedom than women to partake in these spaces.[6]

Although these spaces are restricted for women, Western women who want to study these spaces are often allowed entry.[7]

Contents

Effects of westernization on men's spaces

The westernized view deems men's spaces as discriminatory toward the rights of women [8], and therefore fit for abolition.[9] This western standard generally does not apply toward women's spaces, which are viewed as beneficial for women.

Male bonding and men's spaces

These men's spaces promote bonding between men, which is the essence of the strength of these spaces.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ A room of (his) own: Italian and Italian-American male-bonding spaces and homosociality.(Report; Weibel-Orlando, Joan; The Journal of Men's Studies; Quote: This article focuses on underlying psychosocial rationales for perpetuating male-exclusive associations. Further explored is what establishment of such female-excluding male spaces reveal about relative parallels and/or differences in construction of gender identity and definitions of masculinity held by participating members of two male group--one in the Tuscany region of Central Italy, the other in southwestern Connecticut and made up largely of second and third generation Italian-Americans. Do these men, when in their own and exclusive company, act out too easily assumed stereotypes of Italian and Italian-American masculinities--hot tempered, competitive, prone to violence, mother
  2. ^ Northern Exporsure Metropolismag.com; Quote: ... Stud: Architectures of Masculinity (Princeton, 1996), a collection of interdisciplinary essays on the role architecture plays in the construction of male identity. The book, which Sanders edited, offers critical examinations of traditionally male spaces-the bachelor pad, urinal, and gym are a few.
  3. ^ Music and Gender: Perspectives from the Mediterranean; By Tullia Magrini; Published by University of Chicago Press, 2003; ISBN 0226501663, 9780226501666; 371 pages; Quote: The unease that men feel about women singing paghjelle nevertheless goes beyond questions of upholding custom and defending one's territory. Gilmore (1987, 15) has pointed to the lack of male initiation ceremonies in the Mediterranean as a whole and the resulting ambiguity as to what marks the passage of a boy at puberty from the female-dominated domestic world to adult male society. The fact that it is usual for Corsican males to become properly integrated into the paghjella-singing tradition at the time of their passage from adolescence to adulthood, as signified by the breaking of the voice (Catinchi 1999, 51), suggests elements of a male rite of passage that, together with the function of male bonding already discussed, makes any female intrusion understandably inappropriate or at least discomforting.
  4. ^ A Room of (His) Own: Italian and Italian-American Male-bonding Spaces and Homosociality; Joan Weibel-Orlando1; University of Southern California; Abstract: This article focuses on underlying psychosocial rationales for perpetuating male-exclusive associations. Further explored is what establishment of such female-excluding male spaces reveal about relative parallels and/or differences in construction of gender identity and definitions of masculinity held by participating members of two male group—one in the Tuscany region of Central Italy, the other in southwestern Connecticut and made up largely of second and third generation Italian-Americans. Do these men, when in their own and exclusive company, act out too easily assumed stereotypes of Italian and Italian-American masculinities—hot tempered, competitive, prone to violence, mother adoring, Latin lovers? Or are their constructions of masculinity based on other and socioculturally and ethnohistorically tempered criteria of masculinity (Società, skill attainment, physical strength and separation from an impoverished past and the feminine)?
  5. ^ Transgressing boundaries : gendered spaces, species and indigenous forest management in Uganda; Author(s) Nabanoga K., G.N.; Wageningen University Dissertation; Quote: Weeding in croplands and home gardens is predominantly a women's activity, although croplands are perceived to be a male space.
  6. ^ Roman military bases as complex gendered spaces Penelope ALLISON; Quote: The traditional perception of Roman military bases, particularly those from the early empire, is that they were predominantly segregated male spaces from which soldiers could carry out the business of war, unhindered by domestic lives involving women and families.
  7. ^ Music and Gender: Perspectives from the Mediterranean; By Tullia Magrini; Published by University of Chicago Press, 2003; ISBN 0226501663, 9780226501666; 371 pages; Quote: The fact remains, however, that women partaking in what are essentially men's songs are obliged to negotiate men's spaces and at the same time to compromise their own gender identity, which becomes of necessity ambiguous. In my own case, the fact that, as a foreigner, I was already outside the cultural norm combined with my "passion for the song" (reinforced by the distances I had traveled) to make it less problematic than might have been expected for me to move in men's spaces. I was also doubtless held to be pardonably naive as far as matters of honor were concerned.
  8. ^ Engineering workplace cultures: men's spaces and (in)visible women? Dr Wendy Faulkner
  9. ^ Rebel Girls; Six Documentaries by Kim Longinotto; BY GARY MORRIS; Bright lights film journal; Quote: If the village films show women trying to have the same rights as men, the urban films go further in showing women actually appropriating traditionally male spaces
  10. ^ Of Men and Mice: C. S. Lewis on Male–Female Interactions; Gretchen Bartels; University of California, Riverside; Quote: Lewis laments and proposes reasons for the decline of exclusively male spaces. He posits that ‘in general (there are numerous individual exceptions) men like men better than women like women

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