Mercy: Wikis

  
  

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Mercy (Middle English, from Anglo-French merci, from Medieval Latin merced-, merces, from Latin, "price paid, wages", from merc-, merx "merchandise") can refer both to compassionate behaviour on the part of those in power (e.g. mercy shown by a judge toward a convict), on the part of a humanitarian third party (e.g. a mission of mercy aiming to treat war victims) or divine mercy shown to the penitent.[1] Mercy is a word used to describe compassion shown by one person to another, or a request from one person to another to be shown such leniency or unwarranted compassion for a crime or wrongdoing. Some of the earliest recorded expressions of divine mercy are found in Ancient Egyptian literature.[2] One of the basic virtues of chivalry, Christian ethics, Islam, and Judaism, it is also related to concepts of justice and morality in behaviour between people.

In a legal sense, a defendant having been found guilty of a capital crime may ask for clemency from being executed.

To be "mercy", the behavior generally can not be compelled by outside forces. (A famous literary example is from The Merchant of Venice when Portia asks Shylock to show mercy. He asks, On what compulsion, must I? She responds:

The quality of mercy is not strained.
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown.
His scepter shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings.
But mercy is above this sceptered sway;
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings;
It is an attribute of God himself;
And earthly power doth then show like God's
When mercy seasons justice.

A number of organizations (e.g. the Mercy Corps, the Sisters of Mercy, Mercyful Fate and the Temple of Mercy and Charity) use the word "mercy" in their name to describe their work.

Ethicist Jacob Appel has noted a decline of mercy, and a comcommittant increase in retribunion, in American public life. Appel has written:

One of the glaring -- yet too often overlooked -- failings of contemporary America is that we have become a nation obsessed with justice and retribution. We claim to be The Land of the Free, yet we have lost sight of what it means to be imprisoned: denied liberty and access to one's family, subjected to isolation and violence and unspeakable boredom. We have come to believe, in the most pernicious way, that people should get what they deserve. What a sea change it might be in our public discourse and our civic life if we focused instead upon mercy and forgiveness. A merciful and forgiving culture might find itself with less anger, less social disruption, and even less crime.[3]

References

  • Jacob Appel. What I Want For Christmas: Mass Clemency, Dec. 23, 2009.
  • Ralf van Bühren: Die Werke der Barmherzigkeit in der Kunst des 12.–18. Jahrhunderts. Zum Wandel eines Bildmotivs vor dem Hintergrund neuzeitlicher Rhetorikrezeption (Studien zur Kunstgeschichte, vol. 115), Hildesheim / Zürich / New York: Verlag Georg Olms 1998. ISBN 3-487-10319-2
  • Sterling Harwood, "Is Mercy Inherently Unjust?," in Michael J. Gorr and Sterling Harwood, eds., Crime and Punishment: Philosophic Explorations (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2000, formerly Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 1996), pp. 464–470.
  • Jeffrie G. Murphy, "Mercy and Legal Justice," in Michael J. Gorr and Sterling Harwood, eds., Crime and Punishment: Philosophic Explorations (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 2000, formerly Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 1996), pp. 454–463.
  • Lampert, K.(2005); Traditions of Compassion: From Religious Duty to Social Activism. Palgrave-Macmillan
  • Witt, David (2008); "Mercy"

Notes

  1. ^ "Magic in ancient Egypt", Geraldine Pinch, p. 44, University of Texas Press, 1995, ISBN 0292765592
  2. ^ "The pyramid builders of ancient Egypt: a modern investigation of pharaoh's workforce", Ann Rosalie David, p86, Routledge, 1996, ISBN 0415152925
  3. ^ Appel, Jacob. What I Want For Christmas: Mass Clemency, Dec. 23, 2009.

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Mercy is the quality of showing restraint againt those whom one has the power to punish.

Contents

Sourced

  • One of the glaring -- yet too often overlooked -- failings of contemporary America is that we have become a nation obsessed with justice and retribution....We have come to believe, in the most pernicious way, that people should get what they deserve. What a sea change it might be in our public discourse and our civic life if we focused instead upon mercy and forgiveness. A merciful and forgiving culture might find itself with less anger, less social disruption, and even less crime.
  • And what does the Lord require of you but to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God?
  • The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath: it is twice bless’d;
    It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.
  • Consider this,
    That in the course of justice none of us
    Should see salvation; we do pray for mercy;
    And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
    The deeds of mercy.
  • No ceremony that to great ones 'longs,
    Not the king's crown nor the deputed sword,
    The marshal's truncheon nor the judge's robe,
    Become them with one half so good a grace
    As mercy does.
  • Reason to rule, mercy to forgive:
    The first is law, the last prerogative.
    • John Dryden, The Hind and the Panther (1687), Part I, l. 261-262.
  • Special mercy arouses more gratitude than universal mercy.
    • Richard Baxter, The Saints' Everlasting Rest (1650), "The Splendor of the Saints' Rest".
  • MERCY, n. An attribute beloved of detected offenders.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)

Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).

  • Who will not mercy unto others show,
    How can he mercy ever hope to have?
  • God loves our mercy to one another; but not upon conditions at variance with sanctity to Him.
  • Kind hearts are here; yet would the tenderest one
    Have limits to its mercy; God has none.
    • A. A. Proctor, p. 409.
  • Nothing humbles and breaks the heart of a sinner like mercy and love. Souls that converse much with sin and wrath, may be much terrified; but souls that converse much with grace and mercy, will be much humbled.

Unsourced

  • How can we speak of right and justice if we take an innocent creature and shed its blood? How can we pray to God for mercy if we ourselves have no mercy?

External links

Wikipedia
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Look up mercy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary

Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Mercy
disambiguation
This is a disambiguation page, which lists works which share the same title. If an article link referred you here, please consider editing it to point directly to the intended page.


Mercy may refer to:

  • Mercy, a poem by Christopher Smart
  • Mercy, a poem by William Shakespeare

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

MERCY (adapted from Fr. merci, Lat. merces, reward), compassion, pardon, pity or forgiveness. The Latin word was used in the early Christian ages for the reward that is given in heaven to those who have shown kindness without hope of return. The French word, except in such phrases as Dieu merci, sans merci, is principally used in the sense of "thanks," and is seen in the old English expression "gramercy," i.e. grant merci, great, many thanks, which Johnson took for "grant me mercy." In the medieval Church there were seven "corporal" and seven "spiritual works of mercy" (opera misericordiae); these were (a) the giving of food to the hungry and drink to the thirsty, the clothing of the naked, the visitation of the sick and of prisoners, the receiving of strangers, and the burial of the dead; (b) the conversion of sinners, teaching of the ignorant, giving of counsel to the doubtful, forgiveness of injuries, patience under wrong, prayer for the living and for the dead. The order of the Sisters of Mercy is a religious sisterhood of the Roman Church. It is found chiefly in England and Ireland, but there are branches in the United States of America, in South America and in Australia and New Zealand. It was founded in 1827 in Dublin by Miss Catherine McAuley (1787-1841). The object was to perform the corporal and spiritual works of mercy.


<< Franz, Freiherr von Mercy

Florimond Claude, comte de Mercy-Argenteau >>


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also mercy

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Mercy

Plural
-

Mercy

  1. A female given name, one of the less common Puritan virtue names.

Quotations

  • 1844 Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter 2:
    Mr Pecksniff was a moral man — a grave man, a man of noble sentiments and speech — and he had had her christened Mercy. Mercy! oh, what a charming name for such a pure–souled Being as the youngest Miss Pecksniff! Her sister’s name was Charity. There was a good thing! Mercy and Charity!

Related terms


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


compassion for the miserable. Its object is misery. By the atoning sacrifice of Christ a way is open for the exercise of mercy towards the sons of men, in harmony with the demands of truth and righteousness (Gen 19:19; Ex 20:6; 34:6, 7; Ps 8510; 86:15, 16). In Christ mercy and truth meet together. Mercy is also a Christian grace (Mt 5:7; 18:33-35).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)

This article needs to be merged with MERCY (Jewish Encyclopedia).

Simple English

Mercy can refer both to a compassionate behavior on the part of those in power (for example, mercy shown by a judge toward a criminal by not punishing them as much as they might be punished) or on the part of a compassionate third party (e.g. a trip out of mercy trying to treat sick children in Africa). The word is very common in several religions (for example, the mercy of God).

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