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Mesa Del Rey Airport: Wikis

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Mesa Del Rey Airport
IATA: KICICAO: KKICFAA: KIC
Summary
Airport type Public
Operator City of King City
Location King City, California
Elevation AMSL 370 ft / 112.8 m
Coordinates 36°13′41″N 121°07′19″W / 36.22806°N 121.12194°W / 36.22806; -121.12194Coordinates: 36°13′41″N 121°07′19″W / 36.22806°N 121.12194°W / 36.22806; -121.12194
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
11/29 4,485 1,367 Asphalt

Mesa Del Rey Airport (IATA: KICICAO: KKICFAA LID: KIC) is a public airport located one mile (1.6 km) northeast of King City, serving Monterey County, California, USA. The airport is mostly used for general aviation.

Contents

Facilities

Mesa Del Rey Airport covers 112 acres (0.45 km2) and has one runway:

  • Runway 11/29: 4,485 x 100 ft (1,367 x 30 m), Surface: Asphalt

History

Opened in April 1940 as Palo Alto Airport or King City Airport. Originally had 4,570' NW/SE hard surfaced runway. Was used for most of World War II by the United States Army Air Forces as a primary (level 1) contract pilot training airfield. Had four local auxiliary airfields for emergency and overflow landings. Pilot training contractor was Palo Alto Airport, Inc. Flying training was performed with Fairchild PT-19s as the primary trainer. Also had several PT-17 Stearmans.

Military control of the airport was transferred to the United States Navy in April 1945. Was known as King City Naval Auxiliary Air Station (NAAS). Navy declared airport surplus on 30 September 1945. Eventually discharged to the War Assets Administration (WAA) and became a civil airport.

See also

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  • Shaw, Frederick J. (2004), Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy, Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, Washington DC, 2004.
  • Manning, Thomas A. (2005), History of Air Education and Training Command, 1942–2002. Office of History and Research, Headquarters, AETC, Randolph AFB, Texas ASIN: B000NYX3PC
  • FAA Airport Master Record for KIC (Form 5010 PDF)

External links

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