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A sign indicating Meyerland
Stores in Meyerland Plaza

Meyerland is a 6,000-acre (24 km2) community in southwest Houston, Texas, outside of the 610 Loop and inside Beltway 8.

A notable feature of Meyerland is Meyerland Plaza, a large outdoor shopping center. Meyerland also is the center of Houston's Jewish community. Meyerland is the home of Houston's Jewish Community Center, Congregation Beth Israel, Congregation Beth Yeshurun, and several smaller synagogues.

The neighborhood is named after the Meyer family, who bought and owned 6,000 acres (24 kmĀ²) of land in southwest Houston.

Contents

History

George Meyer developed 1,200 acres (5 km2) of former rice fields into the Meyerland subdivision in 1955. Richard Nixon was at the subdivision's ribbon-cutting ceremony.[1]

Government

In the first 1991 Mayor of Houston election most Meyerland voters voted for Bob Lanier.[2][3] Meyerland mostly votes Democratic in elections.

Meyerland is in Texas's 7th congressional district.[4]

Education

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Primary and secondary education

Public schools

Johnston Middle School serves most of Meyerland

The neighborhood is served by several Houston Independent School District schools.[5][6]

The portion of the neighborhood north of the Brays Bayou is zoned to Lovett Elementary School.[7] The portion of the neighborhood south of the Brays Bayou is zoned to Kolter Elementary School.[8] The portion of the neighborhood on the west (section 10, which has a western edge boundary of Hillcroft Avenue) is zoned to Herod Elementary School.[9] Herod is located on the edge of Section 10.[1]

Almost all of the neighborhood is zoned to Johnston Middle School, also located in Meyerland.[10] A small portion is zoned to Pershing Middle School.[6][11] All students who are zoned to Pershing, Johnston, or Long have the option to apply for the regular program at Pin Oak Middle School in the city of Bellaire. Therefore Pin Oak Middle School serves most of Meyerland.[12] One section of Meyerland is zoned to Fondren Middle School.[13]

Meyerland residents are zoned to Bellaire High School, which is also in the city of Bellaire.[14]

From the opening of the subdivision in 1955 until 1958, Meyerland residents attended Horn Elementary School in Bellaire. Bellaire High School opened in 1955. Lovett opened in September 1958. Johnston Junior High School opened in 1959. Kolter opened in 1960. Herod Elementary School opened in 1961. Bellaire High School was remodeled in the 1992-1993 period.[1]

Gallery of public schools

Private schools

Several private schools, including St. Thomas' Episcopal School, are in Meyerland. The Robert M. Beren Academy, Episcopal High School (Bellaire), Corpus Christi Catholic School, and Emery/Weiner School are near Meyerland.

Public libraries

The Meyer Library of the Houston Public Library system

The Houston Public Library operates the Meyer Neighborhood Library, which is near Meyerland.

Police service

The neighborhood is within the Houston Police Department's Southwest Patrol Division [1]. The homeowners association maintains a contract with Harris County Precinct 5 Constable for improved local security.

Parks and recreation

Godwin Park

Two city-operated parks are in Meyerland. Meyerland Park, located at 5151 Jason, is classified as a neighborhood park.[15]

Godwin Park, located at 5101 Rutherglen, is classified as a community park.[16] The Godwin Community Center, on the same lot, has an outdoor pavilion, a playground, and a lighted sports field.[17]

In the early years of Meyerland's existence, eight garden clubs formed. Little league baseball was first organized in Meyerland in 1957, with games occurring at Meyerland Park. By 1958 the Meyerland Teen Club and the Meyerland Civic Club opened. On May 24, 1958, the Meyerland Club officially opened; families gathered at the club, which hosted a swim team. The club closed in 1996 and was sold to the Jewish Community Center, which redeveloped the facility into the Merfish Teen Center.[1]

Media

The Houston Chronicle is the area regional newspaper. On Thursdays, residents receive the Bellaire/West U/River Oaks/Meyerland [2] local section.

The Bellaire Examiner is a local newspaper distributed in the community.[18]

The Meyerland Journal is an alternative weekly political paper that covers the Meyerland and Bellaire regions.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "History of Meyerland." Meyerland. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  2. ^ Rodriguez, Lori. "Saying goodbye, with no regrets." Houston Chronicle. Saturday November 9, 1991. A31.
  3. ^ Bernstein, Alan and Jim Simmon. "Black vote went solidly for Turner/Whitmire failed to produce split." Houston Chronicle. Thursday November 7, 1991. A21.
  4. ^ "Congressional District 7." National Atlas of the United States.
  5. ^ Meyerland Section Map. Meyerland. Accessed September 20, 2008.
  6. ^ a b "Map of Meyerland Sections." Meyerland. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  7. ^ "Lovett Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  8. ^ "Kolter Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  9. ^ "Herod Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  10. ^ "Johnston Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  11. ^ "Pershing Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  12. ^ "Pin Oak Middle School." The Southwest District. Houston Independent School District.
  13. ^ "Fondren Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  14. ^ "Bellaire High School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  15. ^ NeighborRev2List2.gif. City of Houston. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  16. ^ communitylist1.gif." City of Houston. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  17. ^ "Godwin Community Center." City of Houston. Retrieved on December 15, 2009.
  18. ^ "About Us." Examiner News.

External links



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