The Full Wiki

More info on Mike Sweatman

Mike Sweatman: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mike Sweatman (born October 23, 1946 in Kansas City, Missouri) coached special teams in the National Football League for 23 years. Prior to that he was a college coach for 12 years and was a member of the Marine Corps Reserves for 26 years, retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel. During his career, he coached in 3 Super Bowls, winning 2 of them as a coach for the New York Giants.

MIKE SWEATMAN'S Career at a glance:

1968……………………..University of Kansas……………....graduate assistant
1970………………..……Okinawa Devil Dogs………………...…head coach
1971-72………………….Quantico Marines………....…...defensive coordinator
1973-74………………….University of Kansas……………….assistant coach
1975-76………………….Coffeyville Community College…......def. coordinator
1975-76………………….Edmonton Eskimos………………...…..guest coach
1977-78………………….University of Tulsa…………………assistant coach
1979-82………………….University of Kansas……………..…assistant coach
1983……………………..University of Tennessee…………….assistant coach
1984……………………...Minnesota Vikings.………...........outside linebackers/special teams
1985-92………………….New York Giants…..………...........assistant special teams/defensive assistant
1990-92………………….New York Giants.……………………..special teams
1993-96………………….New England Patriots…………………...special teams
1997-2000……………….New York Jets…………………………...special teams
2001-03………………….Chicago Bears…………………………....special teams
2004-06..………………...New York Giants………………………...special teams

Sweatman spent 23 years as an NFL coach, Sweatman has been to three Super Bowls, winning two with the Giants in 1986 and 1990, the latter when Tom Coughlin was a member of the coaching staff. Coughlin brought Sweatman back to the Giants on January 14, 2004 and gave him the title of special teams “coordinator” because he considers the position as important as the offensive and defensive coordinator. It was a good decision. The Giants’ special teams improved significantly under Sweatman the previous two seasons. The year before Sweatman arrived, the Giants averaged only 19.9 yards a kickoff return. In 2004, they led the NFL in kickoff return yardage for the first time since 1953 with an average return of 25.1 yards. Last season, their average kickoff return dropped by less than a yard, to 24.3 yards, good for fourth in the NFL. The Giants’ average start following a kickoff was the 30.1-yard line, which was the best average starting point in the NFC and the fifth-best in the NFL. It was the third season in a row a Sweatman-coached team led the conference in that statistical category. In Sweatman’s first season with the team, the average start was the 31.8-yard line, the best figure in the NFL.

In addition, the Giants’ punt returns improved from an average of 5.1 yards in 2003 (32nd in the league) to 6.7 yards in 2004 (26th) to 9.2 last year (8th). Special teams standout David Tyree was voted to his first Pro Bowl, and punt returner Chad Morton was selected a first Pro Bowl alternate. Jay Feely, a first Pro Bowl alternate, had as the best season by a Giants kicker in history. He led all NFL kickers with a team-record and career-high 148 points to become the first Giants kicker to hold the top spot since Dan Chandler in 1963 (106 points). The 148 points shattered the previous team record of 127 points, set by Ali Haji-Sheikh in 1983. Feely set career highs and tied two Haji-Sheikh team records with 35 field goal and 42 field goal attempts. Punter Jeff Feagles was a consistent and productive player in his 18th season, with a 42.1-yard gross average and a 37.0-yard net average.

Sweatman came to the Giants after three seasons as the Chicago Bears’ special teams coach. In 2003, the Bears’ average start following a kickoff was the 33.5-yard line, which, like the Giants the following year, was the best in the NFL. The Bears were third in the league in kickoff returns, with an average of 23.8 yards, and seventh in punt returns, with an average of 11.8 yards. Jerry Azumah returned two kickoffs for touchdowns and averaged 29.0 yards on 41 returns, and R.W. McQuarters returned a punt 60 yards for a touchdown and averaged 12.2 yards on 37 returns. Chicago limited opposing teams to an average punt return of 7.7 yards, the seventh-best figure in the league. In three seasons working with Sweatman, punter Brad Maynard, the former Giant, landed 85 punts inside the 20-yard line against only 19 touchbacks. In 2001, Sweatman’s first season in Chicago, Larry Whigham was named to the Pro Bowl as a special teams player. In 2003, Azumah earned the honor as a return specialist.

Prior to joining the Bears, Sweatman was the Jets special teams coach for four seasons (1997–2000). He held the same position with the New England Patriots from 1993–96, when he worked under coach Bill Parcells, who originally brought him to the Giants. The 1996 Patriots won the AFC Championship.

Sweatman’s broke into the NFL in 1984 as the Minnesota Vikings’ outside linebackers/special teams coach. The next year he joined the Giants as an assistant special teams coach and defensive assistant. Sweatman was named the special teams coach in 1990.

Sweatman began his coaching career in 1968 as a graduate assistant at his alma mater, the University of Kansas. His collegiate stops included two later stops at Kansas (1973–74 and 1979–82), Coffeyville Community College (1975–76), Tulsa (1977–78) and Tennessee (1983). Sweatman also coached for the Okinawa Devil Dogs (1970), Quantico Marines (1971–72) and served as a guest coach for the Edmonton Eskimos in 1975-76.

Sweatman was a two-time all-conference linebacker and three-time letterwinner (1965–67) at Kansas, where he also co-captained the wrestling team. In his senior year, he was selected team captain, earned academic All-America honors and played in both the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl. Sweatman earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education and later a master’s degree in education at Kansas.

Following college, Sweatman joined the Marines Corps and served four years of active duty as an infantry officer. Upon release from active duty he joined the Marines Corps Reserve and completed 26 years of commissioned service before retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Sweatman and his wife, Teri, have three sons: Tom, Chris, and Dan.

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message