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Mind  
Discipline Philosophy
Language English
Edited by Thomas Baldwin
Publication details
Publisher Oxford University Press (UK)
Publication history 1876 to present
Frequency Quarterly
Indexing
ISSN 0026-4423 (print)
1460-2113 (web)
LCCN sn98-23315
OCLC 40463594
Links

Mind is a British journal, currently published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Mind Association, which deals with philosophy in the analytic tradition. It was founded by Alexander Bain in 1876 with George Croom Robertson as editor at University College London. With the death of Robertson in 1891, George Stout took over the editorship and began a 'New Series'. The current editor is Professor Thomas Baldwin of the University of York.

Although the journal now focuses on analytic philosophy, it began as a journal dedicated to the question of whether psychology could be a legitimate natural science. In the first issue, Robertson wrote:

"Now, if there were a journal that set itself to record all advances in psychology, and gave encouragement to special researches by its readiness to publish them, the uncertainty hanging over the subject could hardly fail to be dispelled. Either psychology would in time pass with general consent into the company of the sciences, or the hollowness of its pretensions would be plainly revealed. Nothing less, in fact, is aimed at in the publication of Mind than to procure a decision of this question as to the scientific standing of psychology."[1]

Many famous essays have been published in Mind. Two of the most famous, arguably, are Bertrand Russell's "On Denoting" (1905), and Alan Turing's "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" (1950), in which he first proposed the Turing test.

Contents

Editors

Notable articles

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late 19th century

early 20th century

mid 20th century

late 20th century

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Robertson, "Prefatory Words," Mind, 1 (1): 1876, p. 3; quoted at Alexander Klein, The Rise of Empiricism: William James, Thomas Hill Green, and the Struggle over Psychology, page 92 [1]

External links


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Mind: A Quarterly Review of Psychology and Philosophy
G. C. Robertson (1876-1891)
G. F. Stout (1891–1920)
G. E. Moore (1921–1947)
et al.
English philosophical journal founded in 1876 by Alexander Bain. After the death of G. C. Robertson in 1891, G. F. Stout became editor and began the 'New Series'. — Excerpted from Mind (journal) on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Old Series

George Croom Robertson, ed.

  • Volume 1 (1876)
  • Volume 2 (1877)
  • Volume 3 (1878)
  • Volume 4 (1879)
  • Volume 5 (1880)
  • Volume 6 (1881)
  • Volume 7 (1882)
  • Volume 8 (1883)
  • Volume 9 (1884)
  • Volume 10 (1885)
  • Volume 11 (1886)
  • Volume 12 (1887)
  • Volume 13 (1888)
  • Volume 14 (1889)
  • Volume 15 (1890)
  • Volume 16 (1891)

New Series

George Frederick Stout, ed.

  • Volume 1 (1892)
  • Volume 2 (1893)
  • Volume 3 (1894)
  • Volume 4 (1895)
  • Volume 5 (1896)
  • Volume 6 (1897)
  • Volume 7 (1898)
  • Volume 8 (1899)
  • Volume 9 (1900)
  • Volume 10 (1901)
  • Volume 11 (1902)
  • Volume 12 (1903)
  • Volume 13 (1904)
  • Volume 14 (1905)
  • Volume 15 (1906)
  • Volume 16 (1907)
  • Volume 17 (1908)
  • Volume 18 (1909)
  • Volume 19 (1910)
  • Volume 20 (1911)
  • Volume 21 (1912)
  • Volume 22 (1913)
  • Volume 23 (1914)
  • Volume 24 (1915)
  • Volume 25 (1916)
  • Volume 26 (1917)
  • Volume 27 (1918)
  • Volume 28 (1919)
  • Volume 29 (1920)
G.E. Moore, ed.
  • Volume 30 (1921)
  • Volume 31 (1922)

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