The Full Wiki

Mogollon Monster: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mogollon Monster
MOGOLLONRIM AZ17.jpg
The Mogollon Rim, Arizona
Creature
Grouping Cryptid
Sub grouping Hominid
Data
Country United States
Region Arizona
Habitat Mogollon Rim

The Mogollon Monster is a legendary creature that has been discussed in accounts from central and eastern Arizona along the Mogollon Rim. It is most often described as a Bigfoot or ape-like creature, but descriptions vary. No physical evidence has been found, and the existence of such a creature is doubted by biologists.

Contents

Description

The Mogollon Monster is reported to be a bipedal humanoid from 6–8 feet tall with large eyes. Its body is said to be covered with long black or dark brown hair, with the exclusion of the face. Reports claim it has a strong and pungent odor like that of a decaying fish.[1]

Stories say the creature is shy and nocturnal. It is generally reported to explore campsites after dark, emit unusual whistle sounds, and hurl stones from locations that are hidden from view.[1]

Reported sightings

Range of sightings

Based on multiple reports, sightings along the Mogollon Rim range from Prescott north to Williams, Arizona, east to Springerville, south to Hannagan Meadow, and west back to Prescott. Most sightings center around the city of Payson.

The oldest known documented sighting of the Mogollon Monster was reported in a 1903 addition of The Arizona Republican, today called The Arizona Republic. In it, I.W. Stevens described a creature seen near the Grand Canyon as having "long white hair and matted beard that reached to his knees." He later stated that after he discovered the creature drinking the blood of two cougars, that it had just beaten with a club, it let out an "unearthly screech".[2]

A member of the White Mountain Apache Nation in Arizona by the name of Collette Altaha stated in 2006, “We're not prone to easily talk to outsiders, but there have been more sightings than ever before. It cannot be ignored any longer.”[3] “No one's had a negative encounter with it,” said Marjorie Grimes, who lives in Whiteriver, the primary town on the reservation. When asked about her encounter she reports that “It was all black and it was tall! The way it walked; it was taking big strides. I put on the brakes and raced back and looked between the two trees where it was, and it was gone!”[3] Regarding local reports, Tribal police lieutenant Ray Burnette states that “A couple of times they've seen this creature looking through the windows. They're scared when they call.” He stated “The calls we're getting from people — they weren't hallucinating, they weren't drunks, they weren't people that we know can make hoax calls. They're from real citizens of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.”[3]

Criticism

Biology professor Stan Lindstedt of Northern Arizona University dismisses the idea that a large homonid creature would remain hidden in such a large area of the country. "I put that in the category of mythology that can certainly make our culture interesting, but has nothing to do with science."[4]

The monster in fiction

After the Rodeo-Chediski Fire burned 467,066 acres of Arizona forest land, Dolan Ellis (Arizona's Official State Balladeer since 1966) wished to help. Years ago, Dolan used a song named after the monster in a campaign against littering, especially in the wildnerness areas of Arizona. The Mogollon Monster is included in Dolan's "Wildfire" song, as a metaphor for the raging fire."[5]

Media

The Mogollon Monster is a topic in folklore collections, guides on "local color", and works of fiction, including the following

  • Abstracts of folklore studies. 10-11. American Folklore Society. 1974. ISSN 0001-3587. OCLC 1460586.  
  • Susan A. Farnsworth (1996). The Mogollon Monster, Arizona's Bigfoot. Mesa, Arizona: Southwest Publications. ISBN 9781881260097, 1881260097. OCLC 37022193.  
  • Susan A. Farnsworth (2007). More Mogollon Monster. Mesa, Arizona: Southwest Publications. ISBN 9781881260226, 1881260224.  
  • Wesley Treat (2007). Mark Moran, Mark Sceurman. ed. Weird Arizona. New York: Sterling Publishing. pp. 78, 80-81. ISBN 9781402739385, 1402739389. OCLC 173400034.  
  • Novels by Bentley Little: The Return (2002, ISBN 9780451206879) and The Summoning (1993, ISBN 9780786014804)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Susan A. Farnsworth (1996). The Mogollon Monster, Arizona's Bigfoot. Mesa, Arizona: Southwest Publications. ISBN 9781881260097, 1881260097. OCLC 37022193.  
  2. ^ Wesley Treat (2007). Mark Moran, Mark Sceurman. ed. Weird Arizona. New York: Sterling Publishing. pp. 78, 80-81. ISBN 9781402739385, 1402739389. OCLC 173400034.  
  3. ^ a b c Scott Davis (KTVK producer) (2 September 2006). "Story, video: Apaches go public with Bigfoot sightings". Arizona Daily Star. http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/environment/144966.  
  4. ^ "Bigfoot hunter searches Fort Apache Reservation". Casa Grande Dispatch. 6 November 2006. p. 14. http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17428394.  
  5. ^ Bonnie Brock (2002). "Dolan's Original Songs - "Wildfire"". dolanellis.com. http://www.dolanellis.com/original_songs/wildfire.htm.  
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message