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Principality of Monaco
Principatu de Múnegu (Monégasque)
Principauté de Monaco (French)
Flag Coat of arms
Motto"Deo Juvante"  (Latin)
"With God's Help"
AnthemHymne Monégasque
Location of  Monaco  (green)

on the European continent  (dark grey)  —  [Legend]

Capital Monaco (As opposed to a common belief, "Monaco-Ville" is just the historical district - hence the confusing name "Monaco-Town" - but is neither a city nor the capital city)[1]
43°43′N 7°25′E / 43.717°N 7.417°E / 43.717; 7.417
Largest Most populated quartier
Monte Carlo
Official language(s) French[2] is the only official language. Monégasque, Italian and English are also widely spoken and understood. (See Languages of Monaco)
Demonym Monégasque or Monegasque
Government Constitutional monarchy and Principality
 -  Prince Albert II
 -  Minister of State Jean-Paul Proust
 -  President of the National Council Stéphane Valeri (UPM)
Independence
 -  House of Grimaldi 1297 
 -  Constitution 1911 
Area
 -  Total 1.95 km2 (232nd)
0.76 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 0.0
Population
 -  2009 estimate 32,965[3] (205th)
 -  2000 census 32,020 
 -  Density 16,818/km2 (2nd)
43,560/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2007 estimate
 -  Total $976 million (179th)
 -  Per capita $70,670 (€50,000) (Mid Sept. 07 est.) (2/3)
HDI (2003) 0.946 (high) (16th as of 2005)
Currency Euro (EUR)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Drives on the right
Internet TLD .mc
Calling code +377

Monaco en-us-Monaco.ogg /ˈmɒnəkoʊ/ , officially the Principality of Monaco (French: Principauté de Monaco; Monégasque: Principatu de Múnegu; Italian: Principato di Monaco; Occitan: Principat de Mónegue), is a small sovereign city-state located in South Western Europe on the northern central coast of the Mediterranean Sea. It is surrounded on three sides by its neighbour, France, and its center is about 16 km (9.9 mi) from Italy. Its area is just under 2 km² with an estimated population of almost 33,000.

Monaco is the name of the country and its capital (and only) city. It is famous as a tax haven, and wealthy foreigners make up the majority of the population, around 84%.[4] It is often referred to as the Las Vegas of Europe.

Monaco is a constitutional monarchy and principality, with Prince Albert II as head of state. The House of Grimaldi has ruled Monaco since 1297, and the state's sovereignty was officially recognized by the Franco-Monegasque Treaty of 1861. Despite being independent, Monaco's defence is the responsibility of France.

Contents

Administrative divisions

Overview

Wards of Monaco
Directly ahead is La Condamine, to the right with the smaller harbour is Fontvieille and to the left with the high-rise buildings is Monte Carlo.

Monaco is the second smallest country in the world; only the Vatican City is smaller. Monaco is also the world's second smallest monarchy (and principality to be more exact). The state consists of only one municipality (commune). There is no geographical distinction between the State and City of Monaco, although responsibilities of the government (State-level) and of the municipality (city-level) are different. According to the constitution of 1911, the principality was subdivided into three municipalities:

  • Monaco (Monaco-Ville), the old city on a rocky promontory extending into the Mediterranean, known as the Rock of Monaco, or simply Le Rocher (the Rock), where the palace is located
  • Monte Carlo, the principal residential and resort area with the Monte Carlo Casino in the east and northeast
  • La Condamine, the northwest section including the port area, Port Nikolas Flores

The municipalities were merged into one in 1917, after accusations that the government was acting according to the motto "divide and conquer" and they were accorded the status of wards (quartiers) thereafter.

  • Fontvieille was added as fourth ward, a newly constructed area reclaimed from the sea (in the 1970s)
  • Moneghetti became the fifth ward, created from a part of La Condamine
  • Larvotto became the sixth ward, created from a part of Monte Carlo
  • La Rousse/Saint Roman (including Le Ténao) became the seventh ward, also created from a part of Monte Carlo

Subsequently, three additional wards were created:

An additional ward was planned by new land reclamation, to be settled from 2014. Prince Albert II announced in his New Year Speech 2009 that plans had been put on hold due to the current economic climate.[citation needed]

Traditional quarters and modern geographic areas

The traditional four quarters of Monaco are Monaco-Ville, La Condamine, Monte Carlo and Fontvieille. These quarters and Moneghetti are the five "modern geographic areas", defined by the Monaco Department of Tourism.[5]

Wards

Currently the principality is subdivided into ten wards (with their official numbers; Le Portier, the proposed ward, was anticipated as number 11):

No. Ward Area
(m²)
Population
(Census
of 2000)
Density
km2
City
Blocks
(îlots)
Remarks
Former municipality of Monaco
05 Monaco-Ville 184,750 1,034 5597 19 Old City with palace
Former municipality of Monte Carlo
01 Monte Carlo/Spélugues (Bd. Des Moulins-Av. de la Madone) 281,461 3,034 10779 20 the casino and resort area
02 La Rousse/Saint Roman (Annonciade-Château Périgord) 105,215 3,223 30633 15 in the northeast, incl. Le Ténao
03 Larvotto/Bas Moulins (Larvotto-Bd Psse Grace) 328,479 5,443 16570 15 eastern beach area
10 Saint Michel (Psse Charlotte-Park Palace) 142,223 3,807 26768 24 central residential area
Former municipality of La Condamine
04 La Condamine 237,283 3,847 16213 27 port area in the northwest
07 La Colle (Plati-Pasteur-Bd Charles III) 188,073 2,822 15005 15 on the western border with Cap d'Ail
08 Les Révoires (Hector Otto-Honoré Labande) 75,747 2,515 33203 11 containing the Jardin Exotique
09 Moneghetti/ Bd de Belgique (Bd Rainier III-Bd de Belgique 107,056 3,003 28051 18  
New land reclaimed from the sea
06 Fontvieille 324,157 3,292 10156 9 started 1971
11 Le Portier 275,000(1) - - - plans put on hold by Prince Albert II in 2009
  Monaco 1,974,444 32,020 16217 173  
(1) Area not included in total, as it is only proposed

Note: for statistical purposes, the wards of Monaco are further subdivided into 173 city blocks (îlots), which are comparable to the census blocks in the United States.

History

The Principality of Monaco

Monaco's name comes from the nearby Phocaean Greek colony, in the 6th century. Referred to the Ligurians as Monoikos, from the Greek μόνοικος "single house", from μόνος "alone, single" + οίκος "house", which bears the sense of a people either settled in a "single habitation" or of "living apart" from others. Another Greek word etymologically related to the name of this principality is μόνaκος which means "alone" from which the word monastery and monasticism are derived. According to an ancient myth, Hercules passed through the Monaco area and turned away the previous gods. As a result, a temple was constructed there, the temple of Hercules Monoikos. Because the only temple of this area was the "House" of Hercules, the city was called Monoikos.[6]

Statue of François Grimaldi, "il Malizia" ("the Shrewd"), guised as a monk with a sword under his frock before the Prince's Palace of Monaco.

Following a land grant from Emperor Henry VI in 1191, Monaco was re-founded in 1228 as a colony of Genoa. Monaco has been ruled by the House of Grimaldi since 1297, when Francesco Grimaldi ("Il Malizia", translated from Italian either as "The Malicious One" or "The Cunning One") and his men captured the fortress protecting the Rock of Monaco while he was dressed as a Franciscan monk - a Monaco in Italian, although this is a coincidence as the area was already known by this name.

In 1793, French Revolutionary forces captured Monaco, and it remained under French control until 1814. The principality was re-established that year, only to be designated a protectorate of the Kingdom of Sardinia by the Congress of Vienna in 1815. Monaco remained in this position until 1860, when by the Treaty of Turin, Sardinia ceded to France the surrounding county of Nice (as well as Savoy). During this time there was unrest in the towns of Menton and Roquebrune, which declared independence, hoping for annexation by Sardinia. The unrest continued until the ruling prince gave up his claim to the two towns (some 95% of the country), and they were ceded to France in return for four million francs. This transfer and Monaco's sovereignty was recognised by the Franco-Monegasque Treaty of 1861.

Until the adoption of the 1911 constitution, the princes of Monaco were absolute rulers. In July 1918, a treaty was signed providing for limited French protection over Monaco. The treaty, part of the Treaty of Versailles, established that Monegasque international policy would be aligned with French political, military, and economic interests.

In 1943, the Italian army invaded and occupied Monaco, setting up a Fascist administration. Shortly thereafter, following Mussolini's collapse in Italy, the Nazi German Wehrmacht occupied Monaco and began the deportation of the Jewish population. The prominent French Jew René Blum (Paris, 13 March 1878 – Auschwitz, 30 April 1943), who founded the Ballet de l'Opera in Monte Carlo, was arrested in his Paris home and held in the Drancy deportation camp outside Paris, France whence he was then shipped to the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he was killed.

Rainier III, Prince of Monaco from 1949 to 2005.

Rainier III who ruled until 2005, acceded to the throne following the death of his grandfather, Prince Louis II, in 1949. On April 19, 1956, Prince Rainier married the American actress Grace Kelly; the event was widely televised and covered in the popular press, focusing the world's attention on the tiny Principality.

A new constitution in 1962 abolished capital punishment, provided for women's suffrage, and established a Supreme Court of Monaco to guarantee fundamental liberties. In 1993, the Principality of Monaco became a member of the United Nations, with full voting rights. In 2002, a new treaty between France and Monaco specified that, should there be no heirs to carry on the Grimaldi dynasty, the principality would still remain an independent nation rather than revert to France. Monaco's military defence, however, is still the responsibility of France.

On 31 March 2005, Prince Rainier III, too ill to exercise his duties, relinquished them to his only son and heir, Prince Albert Alexandre Louis. Prince Rainier died on 6 April 2005, after a reign of 56 years, and his son succeeded him as Albert II, Sovereign Prince of Monaco.

Following a period of official mourning, Prince Albert II formally assumed the princely crown on 12 July 2005, in a celebration that began with a solemn Mass at Saint Nicholas Cathedral, where his father had been buried three months earlier. His accession to the Monegasque throne was a two-step event, with a further ceremony, drawing heads of state for an elaborate levée, held on 19 November 2005 at the historic Prince's Palace in Monaco-Ville. Albert II is the son of the late Princess Grace, known prior to her marriage to Prince Rainer III in 1956 as Grace Kelly.

Law and government

Monaco has been governed as a constitutional monarchy since 1911, with the Sovereign Prince of Monaco as head of state. The executive branch consists of a Minister of State (the head of government), who presides over a four-member Council of Government. Until 2002, the Minister of State was a French citizen appointed by the prince from among candidates proposed by the French government; since the constitution amendment in 2002, the Minister of State can be French or Monegasque. Under the 1962 constitution, the prince shares his power with the unicameral National Council (parliament). The twenty-four members of this legislative body are elected from lists by universal suffrage for five-year terms. The principality's local affairs are directed by the Communal Council, which consists of fifteen elected members and is presided over by the mayor.

Economy

Fontvieille and its new harbour

One of Monaco's main sources of income is tourism; each year many are attracted to its casino and pleasant climate. (Monaco's own citizens are not allowed to gamble in the casino.) In 2001, a major new construction project extended the pier used by cruise ships in the main harbour. The principality has successfully sought to diversify into services and small, high-value-added, non-polluting industries, such as cosmetics and biothermics.

The state retains monopolies in numerous sectors, including tobacco and the postal service. The telephone network (Monaco Telecom) used to be fully owned by the state; it now owns only 45%, while the remaining 55% is owned by both Cable & Wireless (49%) and Compagnie Monégasque de Banque (6%). It is still, however, a monopoly. Living standards are high, roughly comparable to those in prosperous French metropolitan areas.

Monaco is not a member of the European Union. However, it is very closely linked via a customs union with France, and as such, its currency is the same as that of France, the euro. Before 2002, Monaco minted its own coins, the Monegasque franc. Monaco has acquired the right to mint euro coins with Monegasque designs on its national side.

Tax haven

Monaco levies no income tax on individuals. The absence of a personal income tax in the principality has attracted to it a considerable number of wealthy "tax refugee" residents from European countries who derive the majority of their income from activity outside Monaco; celebrities such as Formula One drivers attract most of the attention, but the vast majority of them are less well-known business people.

In 2000, a report by the French parliamentarians, Arnaud Montebourg and Vincent Peillon, alleged that Monaco had lax policies with respect to money laundering, including within its famed casino, and that the government of Monaco had been placing political pressure on the judiciary, so that alleged crimes were not being properly investigated.[7]

In 1998, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) issued a first report on the consequences of the tax havens' financial systems. Monaco did not appear in the list of these territories until 2004, when OECD became indignant regarding the Monegasque situation and denounced it in its last report, as well as Andorra, Liechtenstein, Liberia and the Marshall Islands, underlining its lack of co-operation as regards financial information disclosure and availability.[8][9]

In 2000, the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering (FATF) stated: "The anti-money laundering system in Monaco is comprehensive. However, difficulties have been encountered with Monaco by countries in international investigations on serious crimes that appear to be linked also with tax matters. In addition, the FIU of Monaco (SICCFIN) suffers a great lack of adequate resources. The authorities of Monaco have stated that they will provide additional resources to SICCFIN."[10] The Principality is no longer blamed in the 2005 FATF report, as well as all other territories.[11][12] However, since 2003, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has identified Monaco, along with 36 other territories, as a tax haven.[13]

The Council of Europe also decided to issue reports naming tax havens. Twenty-two territories, including Monaco, were thus evaluated between 1998 and 2000 on a first round. Monaco is the only territory that refuses to perform the second round, initially forecast between 2001 and 2003, whereas the 21 other territories are implementing the third and last round, planned between 2005 and 2007.[14]

Numismatics

In Monaco, the euro was introduced in 2002. In preparation for this date, the minting of the new euro coins started as early as 2001. This is why the first euro coins from Monaco have the year 2001 on them, instead of 2002, like other countries of the Eurozone. Three different designs were selected for the Monegasque coins. In 2006, the design was changed after the death of ruling Prince Rainier to have the effigy of Prince Albert.

Monaco also has a rich and valuable collection of collectors' coins, with face value ranging from 5 to 100 euro. These coins are a legacy of an old national practice of minting silver and gold commemorative coins. Unlike normal issues, these coins are not legal tender in all the Eurozone. For instance, a €5 Monegasque commemorative coin cannot be used in any other country. The same practice concerning commemorative coins is exercised with all eurozone countries. Commemorative coins are legal tender only in their country of issue, unlike normal circulation coins, which are accepted in all euro-zone countries.

Geography of Monaco

With a total area of 1.95 square kilometres (0.75 sq mi) a land border of 4.4 kilometres (2.7 mi) and a coast measuring 4.1 kilometres (2.5 mi) the Principality of Monaco is the second-smallest independent state in the world, after the Vatican City. It lies on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, 18 kilometres (11 mi) east of Nice, France, and is surrounded on three sides by France and on the fourth by the sea into which its maritime claims extend to 22.2 kilometres (13.8 mi). Its highest point is 163 metres (535 ft) above sea level, on the southern slopes of Mont Agel whose 1,109 m (3,638 ft) peak is in France. The country has no natural resources.

Climate

Monaco has a cool-summer mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification: Csb), which is influenced by the oceanic climate and the humid subtropical climate.

As a result, it has warm, dry summers and mild, rainy winters. Cool and rainy interludes can interrupt the dry summer season, the average length of which is also shorter.

Climate data for Monaco
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 55
(12.8)
55
(12.8)
58
(14.4)
61
(16.1)
67
(19.4)
74
(23.3)
79
(26.1)
80
(26.7)
75
(23.9)
68
(20)
61
(16.1)
56
(13.3)
67
(19.4)
Average low °F (°C) 42
(5.6)
43
(6.1)
46
(7.8)
49
(9.4)
56
(13.3)
62
(16.7)
67
(19.4)
68
(20)
63
(17.2)
56
(13.3)
48
(8.9)
43
(6.1)
55
(12.8)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.5
(88.9)
3
(76.2)
2.9
(73.7)
2.9
(73.7)
2.5
(63.5)
1.9
(48.3)
1.5
(38.1)
0.7
(17.8)
1.2
(30.5)
2.6
(66)
4.4
(111.8)
4.6
(116.8)
31.7
(805.2)
Source: {{{source}}} {{{accessdate}}}

[citation needed]

Sport and entertainment

Formula One

Formation lap for the 1996 Monaco Grand Prix.

Since 1929, the Monaco Grand Prix has been held annually in the streets of Monaco. It is widely considered to be one of the most prestigious automobile races in the world. The erecting of the Circuit de Monaco takes six weeks to complete, and the removal after the race another three weeks. The circuit has many elevation changes and tight corners, along with a tunnel. This together with being incredibly narrow and tight makes it perhaps the most demanding Formula One track. Only two drivers have ever crashed into the harbour, the most famous being Alberto Ascari in the 1955 Monaco Grand Prix. (Ascari lost his life four days later at Monza). The other was Paul Hawkins, during the 1965 Monaco Grand Prix.

Monte Carlo Rally

The Monte Carlo Rally has been held since 1911, having originally been held at the behest of Prince Albert I and is, like the principality's Grand Prix, organised by the Automobile Club de Monaco. It has long been considered to be one of the toughest and most prestigious events in rallying and from 1973 to 2008 was the opening round of the World Rally Championship.

Football

AS Monaco FC plays at Stade Louis II and has been one of the more successful French sides of recent times. Because of the popular appeal of living in Monaco and the lack of income tax, many international stars have played for the club, such as Jürgen Klinsmann, Oliver Bierhoff, George Weah, John Collins, Fernando Morientes, Thierry Henry, Fabien Barthez, Rafael Márquez, Javier Saviola, David Trezeguet, Patrice Evra, Shabani Nonda, Emmanuel Adebayor, Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen, Jan Koller and Park Chu-Young. The club reached the UEFA Champions League Final in 2004, led by the likes of Morientes, Evra, Akis Zikos, and Ludovic Giuly, losing 3-0 to Portuguese team, F.C. Porto. The Stade Louis II also plays host to the annual UEFA Super Cup, which is played between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League.

Rugby

Monaco's national rugby team, as of June 2009, is 88th in the International Rugby Board rankings.

Other sports

View of the Port of Hercules, La Condamine, Monaco

The Monte Carlo Masters is currently held annually in neighbouring Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France, as a professional tournament for men as part of tennis' ATP Masters Series. The tournament has been held since 1897. Golf's Monte Carlo Open was also held at the Monte Carlo Golf Club at Mont Agel in France between 1984 and 1992. Monaco has also competed in the Olympic Games, although, as of 2008, no athlete from Monaco has ever won an Olympic medal.

In 2009, the Tour de France, the world's premier bicycle race, started from Monaco with a 15 km closed-circuit individual time trial starting and finishing there on the first day (4 July) and the 182 km second leg starting there on the following day and ending in Brignoles, France.

Monaco also stage part of the Global Champions Tour (International Show-jumping). Acknowledged as the most glamorous of the series, Monaco will be hosting the world's most celebrated riders, including Monaco's own Charlotte Casiraghi, in a setting facing out over the world's most beautiful yachts, and framed by the Port Hercule and Prince's palace. In 2009, the Monaco stage of the Global Champions tour takes place between 25 June - 27 June.

The Monaco Marathon is the only marathon in the world to pass through three separate countries, those of Monaco, France and Italy. The 2010 event takes place on March 21. Runners complete the race by returning to the Stade Louis II.Grand Prix is an annual international sports car race through Monte Carlo's elegant streets.

The Monaco Ironman 70.3 triathlon race is an annual event with over 1000 athletes competing and attracts top professional athletes from around the world. The race includes a 1.9 km swim, 90 km bike ride and 21.1 km run. Official event webpage: http://www.monaco-ironman.com/indeximmc.htm

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Monaco has ten state-operated schools, including: seven nursery and primary schools; one secondary school, Collège Charles III;[15] one lycée that provides general and technological training, Lycée Albert 1er;[16] and one lycée that provides vocational and hotel training, Lycée technique et hôtelier de Monte-Carlo.[17] There are also two grant-aided denominational private schools, including Institution François d'Assise Nicolas Barré and Ecole des Sœurs Dominicaines, and one international school, the International School of Monaco.

Colleges and universities

There is one university located in Monaco:

Demographics

Monaco's population is unusual in that the native Monegasques are a minority in their own country. The largest proportion of residents are French nationals (47%), followed by Monegasque (16%), and Italians (16%). The remaining 21% belong to one of the other 125 nationalities that make up Monaco's international population. A Monacoian is the term used to describe a person living in Monaco who is not a resident or citizen of Monaco.

Religion

Christian

Roman Catholic

The official religion is Roman Catholicism, with freedom of other religions guaranteed by the constitution. There are five Roman Catholic parish churches in Monaco and one cathedral, which is the seat of the archbishop of Monaco. The diocese, which has existed since the mid-nineteenth century, was raised to an archbishopric in 1981 as the Archdiocese of Monaco.

Anglican

There is one Anglican church (St. Paul's Church), located in the Avenue de Grande Bretagne in Monte Carlo. In 2007 this had a formal membership of 135 Anglicans resident in the principality, but was also serving a considerably larger number of Anglicans temporarily in the country, mostly as tourists. The church site also accommodates an English-language library of over 3,000 books.[18] The church is part of the Anglican Diocese of Gibraltar in Europe.

Jewish

The Association Culturelle Israelite de Monaco (founded 1948) is a converted house containing a synagogue, a community Hebrew school, and a kosher food shop, located in Monte Carlo. The community (approximately 1,500 strong) mainly consists of retired Jews from Britain (40%) and North Africa. One third of the Jewish population there is Ashkenazi, while the other two thirds are Sephardic.[19]

Security

Sunset in Monte Carlo

The wider defence of the nation is provided by France. Monaco has no navy or air force, but on both a per-capita and per-area basis, Monaco has the largest police force (515 police officers for 32,000 people) and police presence in the world. Its police includes a specialist unit which operates patrol and surveillance boats. There is also a small military consisting of a (mainly ceremonial) bodyguard unit for the Prince and his palace called the Compagnie des Carabiniers du Prince which numbers 112 officers and men and is equipped with modern weapons such as M16 rifles and 9 mm pistols, and a militarized (and armed) fire and civil defence Corps.

The Compagnie des Carabiniers du Prince (Prince's Company of Carabiniers) is the main ceremonial unit of the military force of Monaco. It was created by Prince Honoré IV in 1817 for the protection of the Principality and the Princely family. The company numbers exactly 112 officers and men; while the NCOs and soldiers are local, the officers have generally served in the French Army. Together with the local fire service, the Carabiniers form Monaco's total public forces. In addition to their guard duties, the company patrols the Principality's beaches and coastal waters, as well as duties around the Palace in Monaco-Ville.

Flag

It is one of the world's oldest national flag designs. The flag of Monaco is identical to that of Indonesia (except for the ratio of height to width).[20]

Transport

Monaco is served by several train systems and the Monaco - Fontvieille Heliport. The closest airport is Cote d'Azur Airport in Nice, France. Some airlines marketed Monaco via Nice Airport.[21]

Panoramic view of La Condamine, Monaco

See also

References

  1. ^ "History & Heritage". Council of Government. http://www.gouv.mc/devwww/wwwnew.nsf/1909!/x2Gb?OpenDocument&2Gb. Retrieved 2008-05-22. 
  2. ^ "Constitution de la Principauté". Council of Government. http://www.gouv.mc/devwww/wwwnew.nsf/1909$/036c62fe5f92f2efc1256f5b0054fa42gb?OpenDocument&3Gb. Retrieved 2008-05-22. 
  3. ^ Monacoprint at The World Factbook
  4. ^ U.S. Department of State Per capita purchasing power parity GDP (US dept. of State 2006 est.): $30,000
  5. ^ Infos on www.visitmonaco.com
  6. ^ Strabo, Geography, Gaul, 4.6.3 at LacusCurtious
  7. ^ Assemblee-Nationale report
  8. ^ Declaration of April 18th, 2004, by the representative of the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration Gabriel Makhlouf regarding the list of alleged tax havens non-cooperatives countries comparable
  9. ^ Stage Report 2004: Project of OECD on the detrimental tax practices, OECD, Paris, 2004
  10. ^ "Review to Identify Non-Cooperative Countries or Territories: Increasing the Worldwide Effectiveness of Anti-Money Laundering Measures". Paris: Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering. 2000-06-22. p. 8. http://www.fatf-gafi.org/dataoecd/56/43/33921824.pdf. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  11. ^ Review to Identify Non-Cooperative Countries or Territories: Increasing the Worldwide Effectiveness of Anti-Money Laundering Measures, FATF, Paris, 2005
  12. ^ Review to Identify Non-Cooperative Countries or Territories: Increasing the Worldwide Effectiveness of Anti-Money Laundering Measures, FATF, Paris, 2006
  13. ^ Financial Centres with Significant Offshore Activities in Offshore Financial Centres. The Assessment Program. A Progress Report Supplementary Information, IMF, Washington, 2005
  14. ^ First Mutual Evaluation Report on the Principality of Monaco, Moneyval, Strasbourg, 2003
  15. ^ Collège Charles III
  16. ^ Lycée Albert 1er
  17. ^ "Lycée technique et hôtelier de Monte-Carlo" (in French). Monaco. http://www.lycee-technique.mc/. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  18. ^ See the website of St Paul's Church, Monaco.
  19. ^ Details at Jewish Virtual Library
  20. ^ Monaco Flag - World Flags 101 - Monacan Flags
  21. ^ "Route Map" in 1993, Trans World Airlines

External links

Government
General information
Travel
Other
  • [2]
  • (English) The Monaco Times - a regular feature in The Riviera Times is the English language newspaper for the French - Italian Riviera and the Principality of Monaco provides monthly local news and information about business, art and culture, people and lifestyle, events and also the real estate market.[http://www.monacotimes.com]

Map and statistical tables for download (PDF)]

Coordinates: 43°43′58″N 7°25′11″E / 43.73278°N 7.41972°E / 43.73278; 7.41972


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Europe : Monaco
Location
noframe
Flag
Image:mn-flag.png
Quick Facts
Capital Monaco
Government constitutional monarchy
Currency euro (EUR)
Area 1.95 sq km
Population 32,671 (July 2007 est.)
Language French (official), English, Italian, Monegasque
Religion Roman Catholic (90%)
Electricity 230V/50Hz (European plug)
Calling Code +377
Internet TLD .mc
Time Zone UTC +1

The principality of Monaco or the city-state Monaco [1] lie in between the Alps and the Mediterranean Sea, bounded by the French Riviera to the west and the Italian Riviera to the east. It is the second smallest independent state in the world (after the Vatican) and is almost entirely urban. Monte Carlo is not the capital of Monaco but a government district. The country is divided into four areas: Monaco-Ville (the old city), the Condamine (port quarter), Monte-Carlo (business and recreation), and Fontvieille (recreation and light industry). With no natural resources to exploit other than its location and climate, the principality has become a resort for tourists and a tax haven for businesses. Monaco is six times the size of the Vatican and still remains the world's most densely populated independent country.

Get in

By plane

The nearest airport is the Nice Côte-d'Azur International [2], which is around 25 miles away from the city-centre in neighboring France. It operates daily flights to nearly all of Europe's main cities, such as London and Paris. There are regular Rapide Cote D’Azur [3] buses connecting Monte Carlo with both the terminals at Nice Cote-D'Azur airport, and taxis are always available outside the terminal buildings - although make sure a fee is agreed in advance or the meter is indeed switched on at the start of the journey, as French taxi drivers are notorious for charging tourists whatever they see fit.

By helicopter

Heli-Air Monaco [4] also operates helicopter services between Nice and Monte Carlo, although this is very expensive and generally only for the very wealthy. After collecting your luggage at the Nice airport, you go to the helicopter service waiting area. The helicopter ground crew takes you and your luggage from the Nice airport to the Nice heliport, on the other side of the airport, by van. The flight along the coast is beautiful, and you land right at the water's edge at the Monaco heliport, where a car service takes you directly to your hotel. Other than arriving by yacht, this is the best way for the international traveler to enter Monaco. Rates vary seasonally, in the range of €100-€300. They spike up to €700 or more, however, during the Cannes Film Festival, usually held in late May.

By train

The Monaco-Monte Carlo station has good service to most of neighboring France and Italy. There are 2-4 services per hour to Nice, Cannes, Menton and Ventimiglia (Italy). Most international trains will stop, such as the 'Ligure' which links Marseilles and Milan, the 'train bleu' which operates between Paris and Ventimiglia, and the famous high-speed TGV which runs between Nice and Paris [5]. A TGV train between Paris and Monte Carlo takes around 6 and a half hours. The station also has some links to other towns in the principality. Be aware that there's no left-luggage in the train station nor in the rest of Monaco. There's a law in Monaco forbidding leaving bags etc. in any place.

Map of Monaco
Map of Monaco

For further information like price and times visit Trenitalia [6]

By car

Monaco is easily accessed by its land borders from France or Italy by a network of highways, most commonly used of which is the A8 which runs west from Monte Carlo to Nice and Marseilles, and east towards the Italian border.

Between Nice and Monaco, there are also three more scenic roads: the Basse Corniche (Low Coast-Road - Highway 98), along the sea, the Moyenne Corniche (Middle Coast Road - Highway 7), going through Eze-Village, and the Grande Corniche (Great Coast Road), going through La Turbie and Col d'Eze (Eze Pass). All are pretty drives offering spectacular views over the Coast line. For an extra-special treat, rent a convertible sports car from the many airport rental services and take in the French Riviera in style.

Taxi trips to and from Nice are also affordable.

By bus

There is no bus station in Monte Carlo. Instead, international buses stop at various points throughout the city. Regular buses, run by Rapide Cote D’Azur [7], connect Monte Carlo with Nice and other French destinations. Services run regularly to many major French towns and cities. Route 100 leaves every 15 minutes from the central bus station (Gare Routière) in Nice and costs €1. An express shuttle, route 110, links the Nice Côte d'Azur Airoport and the principality. A bus leaves every half hour and a single ticket costs €14.90 (2008). €28.50 round-trip (9/2009) with stops near all major hotels throughout Monaco, not just Monte Carlo.

By boat

Monaco's two ports are no strangers to private yachts. Port Hercule is exceptionally beautiful and offers mooring and anchoring possibilities for up to five hundred vessels, some of which are extremely large and elegant (in fact, many tourists often take time out of their day to simply have a drink by the water and admire the fantastic super yachts). This port also serves as a regular starting point or terminus for many Mediteranean cruises, so cruise ships can often be spotted sailing in or out of the marina. The Port of Fontvieille, integrated into the new district, can receive as many as 60 vessels of at least 30 meters in length.

At close proximity, the Port of Cap d'Ail is also a choice destination for pleasure-boats.

Port of Monaco from the Palace
Port of Monaco from the Palace

By foot

Walking is by far the best way to get around Monaco; however, there are some areas, such as the Exotic Gardens, that require a large change in elevation and therefore make for rather strenuous hikes. There are also seven public escalators and elevators (all free) that help negotiate the steep slopes of the city. If you find yourself afoot and wanting to reach the opposite bank of Port Hercule, look for the small pedestrian-only ferry that runs each 20 minutes or so during daylight; it costs only one Euro.

By bus

If you don't mind feeling like a member of the working class in Monaco's bourgeois opulence, Monte Carlo operates a bus service, the Compagnie des Autobus Monaco [8], through the city's five bus routes (labeled 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6) which serves 143 stops. Each stop has the bus number(s) that stop there. Many stops also have the routes for each bus that stops there. The service usually starts at around 6 in the morning and runs right through until about 9 o'clock at night. Tickets can be purchased on board the buses themselves or at many news vendors and shops throughout the city - often it will be advertised as to where you can do this. A daily pass allows you to use the buses all day for €3 (9/2009) and can also be purchased onboard the bus. A recent innovation is a night (soiree) bus service that runs in a circular route from 22.00 until 04.00.

By motor scooter

You can easily rent a motor scooter in Nice and take a short trip east along the sea into Monaco. The views are beautiful and the ride is fun along the twisty seaside road. There are plenty of places to park for free. Theft is not a concern, as there are cameras throughout and police everywhere.

By bicycle

It is possible to hire a bicycle from the Auto-Moto-Garage on the Rue de Millo.

By car

Private cars are singularly useless for getting around Monaco, as you'll spend more time trying to park than if you walked or took a taxi instead. Taxis can be hailed on the streets and there are two main taxi stands open around the clock at the Avenue de Monte Carlo and the railway station, although it is always best to agree a fee beforehand or make sure the meter is running. Most hotels will provide courtesy drivers to points of interest, such as the Palace and casino.

International car hire companies do have offices at the airport in Nice and also in Monte Carlo city. These include Avis, Gare Monte Carlo, Europcar and Hertz - drivers must have held a national driving license for at least one year and it is usually requested that the cost is paid for with the driver’s credit card. Driving in the city center can be intimidating in Monte Carlo with heavy traffic - however, it is often worth this to drive alongside the more expensive vehicles in the city!

Talk

Languages: French (official), Italian, English and Monegasque.

See

The principality of Monaco offers a great balance of historical and modern attractions. There are various museums and palaces to visit as well as shopping malls and casinos. Monaco also offers relaxation spots along the harbor and even around the attractions. It is relatively easy to navigate Monte Carlo and Monaco if you take the time to learn where the various "short cuts" are. City maps are generally available at most news vendor stands and shops for a small fee.

Guards at the Monaco Palace
Guards at the Monaco Palace
  • Take a walk through Monaco-Ville, also known as “le rocher” or “the rock.” Monaco-Ville is still a medieval village at heart and an astonishingly picturesque site. It is made up almost entirely of pedestrian streets and passageways and most previous century houses still remain. There a number of hotels, restaurant and souvenir shops tourists can stay, eat and shop at. You can also visit the Prince's Palace, the Cathedral, the Oceanographic Museum, the City Hall, and the Saint Martin Gardens.
  • The Palais Princier (Prince's Palace) is in old Monaco-Ville and is worth a visit. There are guided tours of the palace each day and usually run around the clock. The Palace also offers a breathtaking panoramic view overlooking the Port and Monte-Carlo. Everyday at 11:55 AM, in front of the Palace's main entrance visitors can watch the changing of the guard ceremony performed by the "Carabiniers." “Carabiniers” are not only in charge of the Princes’ security but they offer Him a Guard of Honor and on special occasions, are His escorts. The “Compagnie des Carabiniers du Prince” has a military band (Fanfare); which performs at public concerts, official occasions, sports events and international military music festivals.
  • The Monaco Cathedral was built in 1875 and stands on the site of a 13th century earlier church. It is a Romanesque-Byzantine church dedicated to Saint Nicolas and houses the remains of former Princes of Monaco and Princess Grace. The church square also contains some of Monaco-Ville's finest restaurants.
  • The Oceanographic Museum and Aquarium is a world-renowned attraction. Located 279 above sea level, the museum contains stunning collections of marine fauna, numerous specimens of sea creatures (stuffed or in skeleton form), models of Prince Albert’s laboratory ships, and craft ware made from the sea’s natural products. On the ground floor, exhibitions and film projections are presented daily in the Conference room. In the basement, visitors can take pleasure in watching spectacular shows of marine flora and fauna. With 4,000 species of fish and over 200 families of invertebrates, the aquarium is now an authority on the presentation of the Mediterranean and tropical marine ecosystem. Lastly, visitors can have lunch in “La Terrasse” and visit the museum gift shop.
  • The Jardin Exotique (Exotic Gardens) is one of the many gardens Monaco has to offer. It is also one of Monaco’s finest tourist attractions. Several thousand rare plants from around the world are presented in a walking tour that is quite memorable for the views as well as the flora and plants. Due to the rise in altitude, not only are there many displays of desert plants but there are a handful of subtropical flora displays as well. There is also a grotto (cave) that has scheduled guided tours. The entry cost is a bit steep (€8) unless you're under 16 or a student (€3.50).
  • La Condamine is the second oldest district in Monaco, after Monaco-Ville. Here you can stop and marvel at the many luxurious yachts and cruise ships which usually adorn the docks in the marina. La Condamine is a thriving business district where you can visit the Condamine Market and rue Princesse-Caroline mall. With enjoyable landscaped areas and modern buildings, La Condamine is surely worth a visit.
  • The Monaco Opera House or Salle Garnier was built by the famous architect Charles Garnier. The auditorium of the opera house is decorated in red and gold and has frescoes and sculptures all around the auditorium. Looking up to the ceiling of the auditorium, the visitor will be blown away by the superb paintings. The opera house is flamboyant but at the same time very beautiful. There have been some of the most superior international performances of ballet, opera and concerts held in the opera house for more than a century; consider taking in a show during your visit... but expect to pay top dollar!
  • The Marlborough Fine Arts Gallery was founded in London by Frank Lloyd and Harry Fischer. A second gallery was opened in Rome, another in New York, and one more in Monaco. The gallery holds a grand collection of post-World War II artists and even paintings by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Jules Brassai, Louise Bourgeois, Dale Chihuly, David Hockney and Henri Matisse. Admission is free and the gallery also offers group exhibitions.
  • The Grimaldi Forum is the Monaco convention center. Completed in July 2000, the sun filled building on the sea has a remarkable glass entrance, two convention restaurants, an auditorium for ballet and opera, and two more auditoriums for meetings and other affairs. The Forum also offers two large exhibition halls that can be used for trade shows or other exhibitions. It is also a short walking distance from surrounding hotels.
The Old Casino in Monte Carlo
The Old Casino in Monte Carlo
  • If your wallet permits it, try your luck in the Grand Casino and gamble alongside the world's richest and often most famous. You'll need your passport to enter (as Monégasque citizens are prohibited from gambling at the casino), and the fees for entry range enormously depending on what room you are going to - often from 30€ right up into the hundreds. You can also visit the casino without gambling, but also for a nominal fee. The dress code inside is extremely strict - men are required to wear coats and ties, and casual or 'tennis' shoes are forbidden. The gaming rooms themselves are spectacular, with stained glass, paintings, and sculptures everywhere. There are two other more Americanized casinos in Monte Carlo. Neither of these has an admission fee, and the dress code is more casual.
  • Monaco's streets hosts the best known Formula 1 Grand Prix. It is also one of Europe's premier social highlights of the year. The Automobile Club of Monaco organizes this spectacular Formula 1 race each year. The Grand Prix is 77 laps around 263-kilometers of Monte Carlo's narrowest and twisted streets. The main attraction of the Monaco Grand Prix is the proximity of the speeding Formula One cars to the race spectators. The thrill of screaming engines, smoking tires and determined drivers also makes the Monaco Grand Prix one of the most exciting races in the world. There are more than 3,000 seats available for sale on the circuit ranging from 90€ to more than 500€. Monaco residents often rent out their terraces for the event with prices ranging from 8000€ to 140,000€ for the four days. During the off season, it is possible to walk around the circuit. Tourist office maps have the route clearly marked on their maps, although devotees won't need them! For those who can afford it, you can also take a ride around the track in a performance car.
  • Aquavision: Discover Monaco from the sea during this fascinating boat tour! “Aquavision” is a catamaran-type boat equipped with two windows in the hull for underwater vision, thus allowing the passengers to explore the natural seabed of the coast in an unusual way. The boat can take up to 120 people per journey. Cost for adults are 11€, while the cost for children and for children and students ages 3-18 are 8€.
  • Azur Express: Fun tourist trains make daily tours all over Monaco. You will visit the Monaco Port, Monte-Carlo and its Palaces, the famous Casino and its gardens, the Old Town for City Hall and finally the royal Prince’s Palace. Commentaries are in English, Italian, German and French. This enjoyable tour runs about 30 minutes long and cost is 6€, children under age 5 ride free.
  • In the summer time, Monte-Carlo is illuminated with dazzling concerts at the exclusive Monte-Carlo Sporting Club. The club has featured such artist as Natalie Cole, Andrew Bocelli, the Beach Boys, Lionel Richie and Julio Iglesias among others. The club also hosts a small casino which includes basic casino games. With no one under the age of 18, the rate per person is 20€.
  • While staying in Monaco, you can take a full-day-journey (or half-day-journey, whichever you prefer) to surrounding areas like France and Italy. Monaco is connected to France by highways so renting a car would be the best way to go. You can also take the “train bleu” or a bus to European cities closer to Monaco including Paris, Nice and Ventimiglia. If you want to travel to farther countries in Europe, do so by plane. Amsterdam, Rome, Brussels, Frankfurt and Zurich are less than two hours away by plane.

Buy

Shopping in Monte Carlo is usually quite exclusive and is certainly no place for a budget holiday. There are plenty of places to melt the credit card alongside Europe's high rollers. The chic clothes shops are in the Golden Circle, framed by Avenue Monte Carlo, Avenue des Beaux-Arts and Allees Lumieres, where Hermes, Christian Dior, Gucci and Prada all have a presence. The area on and around Place du Casino is home to high-end jewelers such as Bulgari, Cartier and Chopard. You will find, however, that most tourists will simply enjoy wandering the area and window shopping, even if you don't buy anything. The normal shopping hours are from 9AM to noon and 3PM to 7PM.

For a more cultured take on shopping in Monte Carlo, try the Condamine Market. The market, which can be found in the Place d'Armes, has been in existence since 1880 and is lively and attractive - many hours can be spent simply wandering around, bargaining for souvenirs from the many tiny shops, boutiques and friendly locals. If however, your shopping tastes are more modern, just take a short walk along the esplanade to the rue Princess Caroline pedestrian mall.

The Fontvieille Shopping Centre is also a more "normal" shopping experience with 36 shops selling electronic goods, CDs, furniture, and clothes as well as a Carrefour supermarket and McDonald's. The tourist office also issues a useful free shopping guide to the city.

Some stores to browse or buy:

  • Fred Boutique, 6, av des Beaux-Arts, Monte Carlo 98000. Situated on the exclusive avenue des Beaux-Arts, this is one of only a handful of Fred boutiques in the world. An official jeweler of Monaco's royal family and a favorite of celebrities, you may not be able to afford much in this boutique, but its worth a jaw dropping visit.  edit
  • Boutique du Rocher, 1, av de la Madone, Monte Carlo 98000. Opened by Princess Grace in the 60's, travelers still flock here to grab the very best in take home souvenirs. Choose from hand-carved frames and mirrors, ceramics, homewares and toys. Prices are moderate and all proceeds go to local charities.  edit
  • Davidoff, 17, av des Spélugues, Les galeries du Métropole, Monte Carlo 98000. High end cigar and cigarette store, where you are assisted by staff that know their product well.  edit
  • Galerie Moghadam, 23 & 41, bd des Moulins, Monte Carlo 98000. Award-winning speciality shop that offers superb hand woven tapestries and carpets.  edit
  • Scruples Bookshop, 9, rue Princesse-Caroline 98000. English language bookshop that has a wide variety of non fiction and fiction.  edit

Eat

How to go wrong? Food in Monaco is universally excellent. There are many fine restaurants, beginning with the Cafe de Paris across the street from the casino, to the waterfront restaurants along the Port de Fontvieille. During the winter months, you will find the restaurants to be decently priced--for Monaco. Bouillabaisse is excellent here.

Budget

There are a huge variety of other restaurants and cafés in the city with a moderate price tag and excellent food. There are a few simple cafés along the marina-side, more like beach bars than anything else, that serve simple meals such as pizza, salads and hotdogs throughout the day. These can be excellent for simply sitting back during the hot midday with a cold beer or glass of wine, a snack to recharge your batteries from exploring the city, and the gentle lapping of the Mediterranean (and often the roar of supercars) in your ears. Most of these restaurants are equipped with water-misters in the ceilings that gently cool and refresh the clientele.

  • Stars 'n' Bars, 6 quai Antoine-1, 97-97-95-95. June-Sept daily 11AM-midnight; Oct-May Tues-Sun 11AM-midnight. Bar open until 3AM. American style sports bar serving standard burgers pizzas and sandwiches. Good value for money in Monte Carlo.  edit
  • Pizzeria Monégasque, 4 rue Terrazzani, 93-30-16-38. Mon-Sat noon-1:45PM and 7:30-11PM (until midnight Fri-Sat). For those on a budget, be sure to grab a slice of one of their delicious gourmet pizzas that taste even better when sitting on the outdoor terrace. Main courses are also available from 10€-22€.  edit

Mid-range

Somewhere in between these two dining experiences comes the world-famous Café de Paris, just outside the Casino. Tourists and locals alike can often be found during the afternoon and all through the night laughing, drinking, and eating some fabulous (but verging on expensive) meals. It is definitely a must-go during your stay in Monte Carlo, even if it is just for a snack in the afternoon - it is well worth it. A new favorite in Monaco is Beefbar located in the Port of La Condamine, they serve excellent meat.

  • Cafe de Paris, Place du Casino, 92-16-20-20. Daily 8AM-3AM. The nerve centre of Monte Carlo, where people go to see and be seen, buzzing with the feel of old time Monte Carlo, circa early 1900s. Menu items change frequently, as do the waiters, who seem intent on rushing patrons through their meals. For people-watching, you could try a diet Coke for a mere €6. Reservations to dine are recommended.  edit
  • Beefbar, quai Jean Charles Ray, 98000. Quality cuts of beef on offer, attached with high, though surprisingly worthwhile price tag. Small cups on puree are available for the meat, though an additional cup (one is far too small), costs 8.5€. Wine selections are paired perfectly with the red meat. Chic atmosphere and the staff are extremely attentive.  edit
  • Baccarat, 31, av Princesse-Grace, L'Estoril, 93-50-66-92. Serving some of the finest Italian fare in Monte Carlo, Baccarat has an airy and authentic atmosphere. The oven-baked turbot with artichokes has customers such as Robbie Williams coming back again and again.  edit
  • Fuji, 4 av de la Madone. Sleek and sexy Japanese restaurant that offers authentic sushi favorites at reasonable prices.  edit

Splurge

Dining in Monaco can be a very sobering experience to whomever is paying the bill. Perhaps the most exclusive and famous restaurants in the city are the Louis XV Restaurant and the Le Grill de L'Hotel de Paris, both centered on the very exclusive Hotel de Paris. You are more than likely to be seated next to a member of the rich and famous, and the gourmet food is simply out-of-this-world - however, these experiences come with a rather hefty price tag!

  • Louis XV, Hôtel de Paris, place du Casino. In one of the finest hotels in the world, run by one of the finest chefs in the world (Alain Ducasse) this Michelin 3 star rated restaurant serves dining perfection amongst luxurious glitterati. The level of sophistication for all dishes is hard to be surpassed, the sea bass with Italian artichokes regularly reaches a score of 19/20 by restaurant critics. The restaurant contains the world's largest wine cellar: 250,000 bottles of wine (many priceless) stashed in a rock cave. Reservations are essential, as are jacket and tie for men.  edit
  • Le Grill de L'Hotel de Paris, In the Hôtel de Paris, place du Casino, 92-16-29-66. Although often overlooked by the famed 'Louis XV', look above to the Hotel de Paris's rooftop for its equally elegant contender. Less intimidating than the Ducasse citadel downstairs, Le Grill offers every imaginable sort of grilled fish, and meat that come from the nearby Alps. The selection of 600,000 wines are the perfect accompaniment to every dish, and the service is impeccable. Dining on the rooftop affords you stunning, panoramic views of Monte Carlo, and in the summer, a blanket of starry sky.  edit

Drink

Champagne has the status of a national beverage in Monaco. A single glass can cost as much as €40 at a fashionable restaurant!

  • Zebra Square, Top Floor Grimaldi Forum Ave. Princesse Grace, +377 99 99 25 50. Showcasing panoramic views from the top floor of the Grimaldi Forum, the outdoor seating area offers the perfect spot to see yachts cruising into the harbor. Top models and the people who want to be with them dance the early mornings away here and we defy you not to do the same. Cocktail list is impressive and bite sized treats are available.  edit
  • Bar at the Columbus Monaco, 23 Avenue des Papalins Monte Carlo, 00 377 92 059000. More laidback and informal than some of its counterparts, its subdued atmosphere is a refreshing change from some of the high energy Monaco bars. Decked out in shades of chocolate, its almost as sweet as the chocolate martinis, which come with a big truffle in each glass which slowly melts into your drinks and tastes heavenly. Formula One race car driver David Coulthard is a co owner, which means you're likely to run into some of his race car competitors.  edit
  • Jimmy'z, Le Sporting Club Avenue Princesse Grace, Monte Carlo, + 377 9216 20 00. The ultimate night club in Monte Carlo, the famed Jimmy'z is frequented by royalty and the uber-rich, which isn't a surprise considering some of the hefty price tags, a beer will cost you upwards of £20. If you can't afford it, there are other clubs to go to. There are two entrances -one, two floors down in Le Sporting Club, the other at street level, and many a rock star and billionaire have walked through both. Staff can be quite rude, but so are most of the patrons. Definitely an experience.  edit

Sleep

If you're on a budget, Monaco is not the best place to be. For example, a two star hotel without breakfast and bathroom will cost around €60 per person. A better option is to stay in one of the many towns outside of Monaco, for example Ventimiglia, which is a sea-side town situated on the French-Italian border on the Italian side. Nice is only 1/2 hour away from Monaco and it's very cheap to use the frequent trains. During the winter season, a comfortable two star hotel will only cost you about €20 a person.

The Monaco Tourism center staff will also sit down and make phone calls to assist walk-ins in finding accomodation. Even if you ask for "cheap" lodging.

  • PV-Holidays have two properties in the area [9]. Each room is a self-catering studio or apartment. Located in Beausoleil both properties range from €150-€160 per night. +33 1 58 21 55 84
  • Colombus Hotel: Situated in La Condamine, the Colombus Hotel is co-owned by successful Glaswegian hotelier Ken McCulloch, designer Amanda Rosa and British F1 racing driver David Coulthard (all Monaco residents today). There is an excellent restaurant and the lobby is a great spot to relax on the comfortable sofas. Rooms are modern. The hotel is located just by the heliport, and about 200 meters from the Stade Louis II.
  • Hôtel Alexandra, located near the place du Casino, (). Located at the steps of the place du Casino, the Hotel Alexandra is right in the hub of the city. Light sleepers take note, there is near constant traffic noise, mostly from the Ferraris revving past. For those with good ear plugs, the hotel has well equipped and spacious rooms, with the choice of either bath or shower, as well as mini-bars, colour TV and air-con in the rooms.  edit
  • Hotel Ambassador, corner of ave Prince Pierre, (), [10]. Suprisingly standard mid range hotel that is good value for business travellers and those watching their euros. Rooms are kitted out with the usual TV, mini bar air con, with wi fi access and cable making it a nice touch.  edit
  • Hotel Balmoral, 12 av. de la Costa, 93-50-62-37 (fax: 04-93-15-08-69). Built in 1898, this hotel has eight floors of rooms and lounges with sea views. Rooms are a little on the small side, but are so cozy and inviting that it adds to the hotels charm. There's a restaurant and bar on site, and room service is provided. 115€-210€ ($150-$273) double; 150€-300€ ($195-$390) suite.  edit
  • Hôtel Cosmopolite, 4 rue de la Turbie, 93-30-16-95 (fax: 93-30-23-05). Simple hotel that is well priced given the hotels location. There's no elevator, and only some rooms have bathrooms, but its reasonably cheap and the hotel owner, Madame Gay Angèle is welcoming and makes you feel right at home. 75€-105€ ($98-$137) double without bathroom; 80€-180€ ($104-$234) double with bathroom.  edit
  • TwilightBlue Hotels, [11]. Selection of Hotels in Monaco. €80-€150.  edit
  • Bw Hotel Prince De Galles. checkin: 12:00; checkout: 11:00. Facing the Mediterranean, with panoramic terrace and bar, lush tropical garden and Mediterranean Restaurant. .  edit
  • Hotel Hermitage, Square Beaumarchais, 98-06-59-77. Perched on a clifftop, the Hermitage offer idylic living at its best. The majority of rooms have balconies, so guests can have stunning views from their rooms. While the hotel is quite old, all amenities and features and modern and elegant in their styling and a stay here is truly well deserved. The SBM's Carte d'Or offers the Hermitage's guests transport and access to the facilities of the Monte Carlo Beach Hotel and Les Thermes Marins spa. 320€-528€ ($416-$686) double; 568€-792€ ($738-$1,030) junior suite; from 1,596€ ($2,075) suite.  edit
  • Hotel de Paris, Place du Casino, 92-16-30-00 (fax: 92-16-26-26). Offering a level of sophistication that has awarded itself as one of the world's most famous hotels. Featuring marble pillars, crystal chandeliers, Louis XVI chairs, and sumptous carpets, its a vision of luxury and a favorite amongst the world's travellers. Rooms are simply enormous with marble and brass furnishings and the hotel is home to the country two finest eating establishments, the Le Grill de l'Hôtel de Paris and Le Louis XV. The SBM's Carte d'Or offers the de Paris' guests transport and access to the facilities of the Monte Carlo Beach Hotel and Les Thermes Marins spa. 400€-940€ ($520-$1,222) double; from 1,995€ ($2,594) suite.  edit
  • Monte Carlo Bay Hotel and Resort, 40 av. Princesse Grace, 98-06-02-00 (fax: 98-06-00-03). Awe impressive 4-hectare(10-acre) resort that has made it the best place to stay in Monaco (no mean feat). The high price reflect the quality of stay, you won't get better rooms anywhere. Only steps away from Monte Carlo's beachy sands, more than than 3/4 of rooms open onto sea views. Marble bathrooms feature flat screen tvs with cable, the hotel pool has an indoor pool covered with an ornate glass dome, and the hotel bar is none other than Jimmy'z's, the premier nightclub in the country. The furnishings are sandstone floors, soft Mediterranean pastels and sleek modern amenities. The service to detail is outstanding, different shampoos and towels on different days, and the staff are polite and attentive without being intrusive. Sheer indulgence, but perfect in every way. The SBM's Carte d'Or does not offer the Bay Hotel's guests access to the facilities of the Monte Carlo Beach Hotel or Les Thermes Marins. The Bay Hotel is rather self-contained, but lacks a beach. Jimmy'z is on the same property. 300€-800€ ($390-$1,040) double; 750€-1,400€ ($975-$1,820) suite.  edit

Work

If you are seeking a career aboard one of the many superyachts in Monaco a good place to register and start looking is Crew Central [12]

Respect

In many ways, the Respect section of the France page can detail how to be respectful toward the Monegasque population, however it should be noted that Monaco is a separate nation and it would be very insulting to casually conflate the two. Keep in mind that Monaco's population retain their own history, their own culture and their own lifestyle. With that in mind, everyone is approachable, happy to chat with you and globally simply kind. Directions or other help are only a smile and a question away.

Stay safe

Monaco is a very safe, crime-free location, with a strong police presence. Every public space is blanketed with cameras and any kind of disorder may produce an immediate reaction and the attendance of many officers.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

MONACO, a territory of south-eastern France, the smallest of the sovereign principalities of Europe. Area about 8 sq. m., the length being 24 m. and the width varying from 165 to iioo yds. Pop. (1900), 15,180. Monaco is situated on the coast of the Mediterranean, 9 m. east of Nice, and is bounded on all sides by the French department of Alpes-Maritimes. It includes the towns of Monaco (3292), Condamine (6218) and Monte Carlo (3794) The principality at one time included Mentone and Roccabruna, now known as Roquebrune, which towns, however, were ceded to France in 1861 for a sum of four million francs. The town of Monaco occupies the level summit of a rocky headland, rising about 200 ft. from the shore, and still defended by ramparts. Though largely modernized, the palace is an interesting specimen of Renaissance architecture; the "cathedral" (Romanesque-Byzantine style), and the oceanographical museum may also be mentioned. For this museum a fine building, appropriately decorated, was opened in March 1910 by the prince of Monaco. It stands on the edge of the cliff rising from the sea at the gardens of St Martin, and was designed to house the collections made by the prince during twenty-five years of oceanographical research, and others. Behind the rock, between Mont Tete de Chien and Mont de la Justice, the high grounds rise towards La Turbie, the village on the hill which takes its name from the tropaea with which Augustus marked the boundary between Gaul and Italy. On the north lies the bay of Monaco; along the lower ground on the west of the bay stretches the health and bathing resort of Condamine, with orange-gardens, manufactures of perfumes and liqueurs, and the chapel of Ste Devote, the patron saint of Monaco; to the north of the bay on the rocky slopes of the Spelugues (speluncae) are grouped the various buildings of the Casino of Monte Carlo with the elaborate gardens and the numerous villas and hotels which it has called into existence. Adjoining the Casino terrace and overlooking the sea is the pigeon-shooting ground, the competitions on which are celebrated.

There appear to have been gambling-tables at Monte Carlo in the year 1856, but it was in 1861 that Francois Blanc, seeing his tenancy at Homburg coming to an end, with no hope of renewal, obtained a concession for fifty years from Charles III. This concession passed into the hands of a joint-stock company, which in 1898 obtained an extension to 1947, in return for a payment to the prince of £400,000 in 1899 and of £600,000 in 1913, together with an increase of the annual tribute of 50,000 to 70,000 in 1907, 80,000 in 1917, 90,000 in 1927, and £10o,000 in 1937. None of the inhabitants of Monaco have access to the tables; and their interest in the maintenance of the status quo is secured by their complete exemption from taxation and the large prices paid for their lands. The ruler of the principality, Prince Albert, born 1848, succeeded his father, Prince Charles III., in 1889. He married in 1869 Lady Mary Douglas Hamilton, by whom in 1870 he had a son, Prince Louis: that marriage was, however, annulled in 1880, and subsequently Prince Albert married Alice, dowager-duchess of Richelieu, from whom he was divorced in 1902. The prince is absolute ruler, as there is no parliament in the principality. He is advised by a small council of state, the members of which are appointed by himself. The maire and other municipal authorities are also appointed by the prince. A governor-general presides over the administration. The judicial system is the same as that of France, there being a court of first instance and a juge de paix. By arrangement, two Paris judges form a court of appeal. Monaco is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop.

A temple of Heracles seems to have been built on the Monaco headland by the Phoenicians at a very early date, and the same god was afterwards worshipped there by the Greeks under the surname of Movocicos, whence the name Monaco. Monoeci Portus or Portus Herculis is frequently mentioned by the later Latin writers. From the 10th century the place was associated with the Grimaldi, a powerful Genoese family who held high offices under the republic and the emperors; but not till a much later date did it become their permanent possession and residence. In the beginning of the 14th century it was notorious for its piracies. Charles I. (a man of considerable mark, who, after doing great service by sea and land to Philip of Valois in his English wars, was severely wounded at Crecy) purchased Mentone and Roccabruna, and bought up the claims of the Spinola to Monaco. The princes of Monaco continued true to France till 1524, when Augustin Grimaldi threw in his lot with Charles V. Honore Augustin's successor, was made marquis of Campagna and count of Canosa, and people as well as rulers were accorded various important privileges. The right to exact toll from vessels passing the port continued to be exercised till the close of the 18th century. Honore II. in 1641 threw off the supremacy of Spain and placed himself under the protectorate of France; he was compensated for the loss of Canosa, &c., with the duchy and peerage of Valentinois and various lesser lordships; and "duke of Valentinois" long continued to be the title of the heir-apparent of the principality. In 1731 Antoine, his great-grandson, was succeeded by his daughter Louise Hippolyte; she had married Jacques Goyon, count of Matignon and Thorigny, who took the name of Grimaldi and succeeded his wife. The National Convention annexed the principality to France in 1793; restored to the Goyon Grimaldis by the Treaty of Paris in 1814, it was placed by that of Vienna under the protection of Sardinia. The Sardinian government took the opportunity of disturbances that occurred in 1848 to annex Mentone and Roccabruna, which were occupied by a Sardinian garrison till 1859. With the transference of Nice to France in 1860 the principality passed again under French protection.

See H. Metivier, Monaco et ses princes, La Fleche (1862).


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also monaco, and Mónaco

Contents

English

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Wikipedia

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /ˈmɒ.nə.kəʊ/, /mɒˈnɑː.kəʊ/, SAMPA: /"mQn@k@U/, /mQ"nA:k@U/
  • (US) IPA: /ˈmɑ.nə.koʊ/, SAMPA: /"mAn@koU/
  •  Audio (US)help, file

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Μόνοικος (monoikos), single house) < μόνος (monos), single, alone) + οἶκος (oikos), house), the name of the 6th century BC colony of Phocaeans and an epithet of Heracles (Hercules), Ἡρακλῆς Μόνοικος (Heracles Monoikos). According to an ancient Greek myth and a Ligurian legend, Heracles passed through the Monaco area. A temple was constructed there by Phocaeans, the temple of Heracles Monoikos (Strabo, Geography, Gaul, 4.6.3).

Proper noun

Singular
Monaco

Plural
-

Monaco

  1. A country in Europe. Official name: Principality of Monaco.
  2. The capital of the principality of Monaco.

Quotations

  • 2001Eoin Colfer, Artemis Fowl, p 67
    Holly followed the Italian coast up to Monaco, and from there across the Alps to France.

Derived terms

Translations

See also


Breton

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Danish

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Dutch

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Estonian

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco (country)
  2. Monaco (city)

Finnish

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Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Monaco

Wikipedia fi

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Declension

Derived terms


French

Proper noun

Monaco m.

  1. Monaco (principality)
  2. Monaco (capital)

German

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Interlingua

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Italian

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Monaco

Wikipedia it

Proper noun

Monaco m.

  1. Monaco

Monaco f.

  1. Munich (Monaco di Baviera)

Derived terms


Norwegian

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

See also


Romanian

Proper noun

Monaco n.

  1. Monaco

Swedish

Proper noun

Monaco

  1. Monaco

Simple English

File:Europe location
Map showing where Monaco is in the world

[[File:|thumb|150px|The flag of Monaco]]

Monaco is the second smallest country in the world; about 34,000 people live there. It is located near south-eastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea. French is the most common language spoken in Monaco. The head of state is Prince Albert II; the government and the prince share power. Tourism is the main industry. People in Monaco pay no income tax.

Monte Carlo, famous for its casino, is in the north-east of the country. Monaco is famous for two car races: the Monte Carlo Rally and the Monaco Grand Prix.

A sovereign and independent state, the Principality of Monaco has borders on its landward side with several communes of the French Department of the Alpes-Maritimes; from west to east these are Cap d`Ail, la Turbie, Beausoleil and Roquebrune Cap Martin. Seawards, Monaco faces the Mediterranean.

The population of the Principality consists of 29,972 inhabitants, 5,070 of whom are Monégasques, 12,047 French and 5,000 Italian (according to the last official census in 1990).

Its surface area is 195 hectares, of which nearly 40 were recovered from the sea during the course of the last twenty years.

It lies in a narrow coastal strip which sometimes rises vertically upwards with its highest point at 163 meters. Its width varies between 1050 meters and a mere 350 meters. Its coastline is 4100 meters long.

The Principality has only one commune, Monaco, whose limits are the same as those of the state.

Monaco is made of of four districts: Monaco-Ville ( historic seat of the Principality, located upon the rock where the Prince Palace stands), Monte-Carlo (the district surrounding its Casino), La Condamine (around Port Hercule), & Fontvielle (the new industrial area built on ground reclaimed from the sea (22ha)).

krc:Монакоkoi:Монако


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