Monograph: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A monograph is a work of writing upon a single subject, usually also by a single author. It is often a scholarly essay or learned treatise, and may be released in the manner of a book or journal article. It is by definition a single document that forms a complete text in itself. An author may therefore declare his own work to be a monograph by intent, or a reader or critic might define a given text as a monograph for the purpose of analysis. Normally it is used for a work intended to be a complete and detailed exposition of a substantial subject at a level more advanced than that of a textbook. Monographs form a component of the review literature in science and engineering.

Librarians consider a monograph to be a nonserial publication complete in one volume or a finite number of volumes. Thus it differs from a serial publication such as a magazine, journal, or newspaper.[1]

Contents

Usage

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Taxonomy (systematic biology)

In biological taxonomy a monograph is a comprehensive treatment of a taxon. Monographs typically revise all known species within a group, add any newly discovered species, and collect and synthesize available information on the ecological associations, geographic distributions, and morphological variations within the group. Example: Lent & Wygodzinsky, 1979, Revision of the Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), and their significance as vectors of Chagas' disease. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History v. 163, article 3, pp. 125-520. [2]

The first ever monograph of a plant taxon was Robert Morison's 1672 Plantarum Umbelliferarum Distributio Nova, a treatment of the Apiaceae.[3]

United States Food and Drug Administration regulation

In the context of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, monographs represent published standards by which the use of one or more substances is automatically authorized. For example, the following is an excerpt from the Federal Register: "The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule in the form of a final monograph establishing conditions under which over-the-counter (OTC) sunscreen drug products are generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded as part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products." [4] Such usage has given rise to the use of the word monograph as a verb, as in "this substance has been monographed by the FDA."

See also

References

  1. ^ Prytherch, Raymond John, Harrod's librarians' glossary and reference book : a directory of over 10,200 terms, organizations, projects and acronyms in the areas of information management, library science, publishing and archive management, 10th edn (Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005), p. 462.
  2. ^ http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/handle/2246/1282
  3. ^ Vines, Sydney Howard (1913). "Robert Morison 1620—1683 and John Ray 1627—1705". in Oliver, Francis Wall (ed.). Makers of British Botany. Cambridge University Press. p. 22.  
  4. ^ [Federal Register: May 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 98)][Rules and Regulations] [Page 27666-27693]From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov][DOCID:fr21my99-6]

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