The Full Wiki

Monrovia: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on Monrovia

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For alternate meanings, see Monrovia (disambiguation).
Monrovia
—  City  —
City of Monrovia
Broad Street, Monrovia, Liberia. The Old Ducor Hotel is visible in the background.
Monrovia is located in Liberia
Monrovia
Location within Liberia, West Africa
Coordinates: 6°19′3″N 10°46′47″W / 6.3175°N 10.77972°W / 6.3175; -10.77972Coordinates: 6°19′3″N 10°46′47″W / 6.3175°N 10.77972°W / 6.3175; -10.77972
Country  Liberia
County Montserrado County
District
Established April 25, 1822
Named for James Monroe -U.S. President
Government
 - Mayor Mary Broh
Population (2008)[1]
 Metro 1,010,970
Time zone GMT (UTC+0)

Monrovia is the capital city of the West African nation of Liberia. Located on the Atlantic Coast at Cape Mesurado, it lies within Montserrado County, the most populous county in Liberia. The metropolitan area, with a population of 1,010,970 in the Greater Monrovia District as of the 2008 census, contains 29% of the total population of Liberia and is the country's most populous city.[2] Monrovia is the cultural, political and financial hub for the entire country.

Founded in 1822, Monrovia is named in honor of U.S. President James Monroe, a prominent supporter of the colonization of Liberia. Monrovia was founded thirty years after Freetown, Sierra Leone, the first permanent African American settlement in Africa. The city's economy is dominated by its harbor, and government offices. Monrovia's harbor was significantly expanded by U.S. forces during the Second World War and the main exports include latex and iron ore. Materials are also manufactured on-site, such as cement, refined petroleum, food products, bricks and tiles, furniture and chemicals. Located near the confluence of the Mesurado and Saint Paul rivers, the harbor also has facilities for storing and repairing vessels.

Contents

History

Monrovia in the 1800s.
A historical plan of the city of Monrovia from circa 1830

The area was already inhabited when it was named Cape Mesurado by Portuguese sailors in the 1560s. With the aim of establishing a self-sufficient colony for emancipated American survivors of slavery, something that had already been accomplished in Freetown, the first settlers from the United States under the auspices of the American Colonization Society arrived in Africa in 1821. They landed at Sherbro Island in present-day Sierra Leone. The undertaking was a shambles and many settlers died. In 1822, a second ship rescued the settlers and took them to Cape Mesurado, establishing the settlement of Christopolis. In 1824, the city was renamed to Monrovia after James Monroe, then President of the United States, and a prominent supporter of the colony in sending freed African-American slaves to Liberia, saw it as preferable than emancipation in America. It is the only non-American capital city named after a U.S. President.

In 1845, Monrovia was the site of the constitutional convention held by the American Colonization Society which drafted the constitution that would two years later be the constitution of an independent and sovereign Republic of Liberia [3].

At the beginning of the 20th century, Monrovia was divided into two parts: (1) Monrovia proper, where the city's Americo-Liberian population resided and was reminiscent of the Southern United States in architecture; and (2) Krutown, which was mainly inhabited by ethnic Krus but also Bassas, Grebos and other tribes.[4] Of the 4,000 residents, 2,500 were Americo-Liberian. By 1926, ethnic groups from Liberia's interior began migrating to Monrovia in search of jobs.[5]

In 1979, the Organisation of African Unity held their conference in the Monrovia area, with then president William R. Tolbert as chairman. During his term, Tolbert improved public housing in Monrovia and decreased by 50% the tuition fees at the University of Liberia. A military coup led by Samuel Doe ousted the Tolbert government in 1980, with many members being executed.

The city was severely damaged in the Liberian Civil War, notably during the siege of Monrovia, with many buildings damaged and nearly all the infrastructure destroyed. Major battles occurred between Samuel Doe's government and Prince Johnson's forces in 1990 and with the NPFL's assault on the city in 1992. A legacy of the war is a large population of homeless children and youths, either having been involved in the fighting or denied an education by it.

Economy

The city's economy is dominated by its harbour. Monrovia is Liberia's financial centre. The Central Bank of Liberia is based in Monrovia.

Government

The city is home to the Monrovia City Corporation, which runs many services inside the city.

Former mayors include:

  • W. F. Nelson, 1870s[6]
  • C. T. O. King, 1880s and served three terms[7]
  • H. A. Williams, 1890s[8]
  • Gabriel M. Johnson, 1920s[9]
  • Nathan C. Ross, 1956-1969[10]
  • Ellen A. Sandimanie, 1970s and first woman to hold the position[11]
  • Ophelia Hoff Saytumah, 2001-2009

Geography

Monrovia lies on a peninsula, between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mesurado River and is a major port. The Saint Paul River lies directly North of the city. Monrovia is located at 6°19′N 10°48′W / 6.317°N 10.8°W / 6.317; -10.8. Monrovia is Liberia's largest city and its administrative, commercial and financial centre.

The city is located in Montserrado County however the small town of Bensonville is actually the capital of Montserrado County.

Climate

Under the Koppen climate classification, Monrovia features a Tropical monsoon climate. During the course of the year Monrovia sees a copious amount of precipitation. Monrovia averages 5,140 mm (202.3 in.) of rain per year. The climate features a wet season and a dry season, but precipitation is seen even during the dry season. Temperatures remain constant throughout the year averaging around 26 degrees Celsius (79 degrees Fahrenheit).

Climate data for Monrovia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 32
(90)
33
(91)
32
(90)
33
(91)
34
(93)
31
(88)
29
(84)
30
(86)
29
(84)
30
(86)
32
(90)
32
(90)
34
(93)
Average high °C (°F) 30
(86)
29
(84)
31
(88)
31
(88)
30
(86)
27
(81)
27
(81)
27
(81)
27
(81)
28
(82)
29
(84)
30
(86)
29
(84)
Average low °C (°F) 23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
22
(72)
23
(73)
22
(72)
23
(73)
22
(72)
22
(72)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
Record low °C (°F) 13
(55)
20
(68)
19
(66)
16
(61)
16
(61)
18
(64)
16
(61)
18
(64)
18
(64)
19
(66)
16
(61)
14
(57)
13
(55)
Precipitation mm (inches) 31
(1.22)
56
(2.2)
97
(3.82)
216
(8.5)
516
(20.31)
973
(38.31)
996
(39.21)
373
(14.69)
744
(29.29)
772
(30.39)
236
(9.29)
130
(5.12)
5,140
(202.36)
Source: BBC Weather [12] 2009-08-18

Culture and media

Broad Street, Monrovia

Attractions in Monrovia include the Liberian National Museum, the now ruined Masonic Temple, the Waterside Market (currently closed), cultural centre on Providence Island and several beaches. It is also home to a zoo. The city also houses Antoinette Tubman Stadium and the National Complex sports stadiums. The National Complex is one of the largest stadiums in Africa, with seats for 40,000.[citation needed]

Numerous tabloid style newspapers are printed on a weekly or bi-weekly basis, most of which are no more than 20 pages. Radio and TV stations are available, with radio being a more prominent source of news as problems with the electric grid make watching television more difficult. UNMIL Radio has been broadcasting since October 1, 2003. It is the first radio station in Liberia to broadcast 24 hours a day, and reaches an estimated 2/3rds of the population.[13] STAR radio broadcasts at 104 FM.[14]

The Daily Talk is a compilation of news items and Bible quotations written up daily on a roadside blackboard in the Sinkor region of Monrovia.

Education

Monrovia is home to the University of Liberia, along with Cuttington College and Divinity School and many public and private schools.

Infrastructure

Monrovia Bay

Boats link the city's Freeport of Monrovia, the country's busiest port, with Greenville and Harper.[15] The nearest airport is Roberts International Airport (the only international airport in Liberia), 60 km (40 mi) away at Robertsfield.[15] The city is connected with the rest of the country via a network of roads and railways. Monrovia is listed as the home port by between ten and fifteen percent of the world's merchant shipping, registered in Liberia under Flag of Convenience arrangements. Both private taxis and minibuses run in the city, and are supplemented by larger buses run by the Monrovia Transit Authority. Prior to the wars, the Mount Coffee Hydropower Project provided electricity and drinking water to the city.[16]

Neighborhoods

Over twenty neighborhoods crisscross Monrovia, home to not only Monrovians but residents from all fifteen counties. Several poor neighborhoods on Bushrod Island and Red Light Junction were developed as a direct consequences of Liberian Civil War. Reconstruction of roads, buildings and bridges have occurred in several neighborhoods in post war years. Newer neighborhoods several suburban towns and townships that have helped to alleviate large population within the original city limits. Today, many of these neighborhoods have been incorporated into the larger Monrovia metropolitan area.

  • Bakoi
  • Banjoa
  • Barekling
  • Barnersville
  • Clara Town
  • Congo Town
  • Crown Hill
  • Dixville
  • Doin Town
  • Dwahn Town
  • Fanti Town
  • Gardnersville
  • Jatuja
  • Jocab Town
  • Kru Town
  • Logan Town

See also

References

  1. ^ 2008 National Population and Housing Census, accessed November 09, 2008
  2. ^ GeoHive: Global Statistics
  3. ^ Robin Dunn-Marcos, Konia T. Kollehlon, Bernard Ngovo, and Emily Russ (2005) in Donald A. Ranard (ed.) Liberians: An introduction to their history and culture (Washington: Center for Applied Linguistics) available online here
  4. ^ Tiyambe Zeleza, Dickson Eyoh et al., Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century African History
  5. ^ Tiyambe Zeleza, Dickson Eyoh et al., Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century African History
  6. ^ "Trustees of Donations for Education in Liberia Records: 1842-1939". Massachusetts Historical Society. http://www.masshist.org/findingaids/doc.cfm?fa=fa0221. Retrieved 3 February 2010. 
  7. ^ Burrowes, Carl Patrick (2004). Power and Press Freedom in Liberia, 1830-1970. Africa World. pp. 117. ISBN 1592212948. http://books.google.com/books?id=FaEs88IpUzEC&pg=PA117&lpg=PA117&dq=mayors+of+monrovia+liberia+-broh&source=bl&ots=GfLUtMR-V7&sig=okGI4iuPB28fsfbcIbaYn1D0oG0&hl=en&ei=2EZpS62wGY_2sgOnq6SVBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CAoQ6AEwATge#v=onepage&q=&f=false. 
  8. ^ Payne, Daniel Alexander (1922). A history of the African Methodist Episcopal church: being a volume supplemental to A history of the African Methodist Episcopal church. Book Concern of the A.M.E. Church. pp. 181. http://books.google.com/books?id=CATiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA181&lpg=PA181&dq=mayors+of+monrovia+liberia+-broh&source=bl&ots=OIiHJDCzUh&sig=Fs_1VvXaw_Tn_fYiAJwPeR9mXzQ&hl=en&ei=WkVpS43nKJPkswPHncCfBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CBkQ6AEwBjgU#v=onepage&q=&f=false. 
  9. ^ "African Series Introduction: Volume VIII: October 1913--June 1921". The Marcus Garvey and UNIA Papers Project. UCLA. http://www.international.ucla.edu/africa/mgpp/intro08.asp. Retrieved 3 February 2010. 
  10. ^ "Nathan Ross; Was Mayor Of Monrovia". The Washington Post. January 28, 2003. 
  11. ^ Thompson, Era Bell (January 1972). "Liberian Lady Wears Three Hats". Ebony: 54-62. http://books.google.com/books?id=C3VNev1_SpIC&pg=PA54&lpg=PA54&dq=mayors+of+monrovia+liberia+-broh&source=bl&ots=8WRi4iTxhi&sig=IV1pSEYmvlP-85WGzwRX0XqsIO4&hl=en&ei=LUVpS-HkG4eStgPhtuGZBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBEQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=&f=false. 
  12. ^ "Average Conditions Monrovia, Liberia". BBC Weather. http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/world/city_guides/results.shtml?tt=TT000310. Retrieved August 18 2009. 
  13. ^ [1]
  14. ^ About us. STAR radio. Retrieved on October 13, 2008.
  15. ^ a b Timberg, Craig (March 12, 2008). "Liberia's Streets, Spirits Brighten; Four Years After War's End, Battered W. African Nation Begins a Slow Reawakening". The Washington Post: pp. A8. 
  16. ^ "Montserrado County Development Agenda". Republic of Liberia. 2008. http://www.emansion.gov.lr/doc/MontserradoCDA.pdf. Retrieved 2008-10-14. 

External links

Advertisements

Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Africa : West Africa : Liberia : Monrovia
For other places with the same name, see Monrovia (disambiguation).

Monrovia is the capital, and with a population of around 600,000, also the largest city in Liberia.

Travel Warning

WARNING: Monrovia, and Liberia in general, should not be considered a tourist destination. As of June 2009, basic services such as electricity and running water are all but nonexistent, and the tenuous national peace enforced by UNMIL presence will not protect individual travelers.

Understand

The city center is the image of a tropical capital, melting in the hot sun. Monrovia is a low-rise capital on the sea, lined with palm trees and paint-chipped buildings of no more than three stories. The city, however, has a vibrant vibe on the street.

To be honest, there is not much to do, see, nor buy in the city center. There are a number of merchants lining the streets, selling used clothes, household wares, and an interesting selection of DVDs. There are two large, well-stocked supermarkets in the city center to offer a surprising selection of Western foods.

Still, despite its woes, Liberia has the feeling of a country on the ascent. Billboards line the streets, inviting citizens to pay their taxes to make their country stronger and to take pride in their success. It is not cliché to say that Liberians are extremely friendly, so the streets seem alive and peepy.

Get in

Brussels airlines offers flight from Brussels, Belgium, with a touchdown in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. There are not daily flights, but they are becoming more regular.

Delta Air Lines had planned flights from Atlanta to Monrovia beginning June of 2009, but they have been delayed due to airport security concerns.

Connections from the African continent have increased rapidly in recent months. Monrovia is connected to Casablanca with Royal Air Maroc (which offers connections to Europe and North America), to the Addis Abbaba hub of Ethiopian Airlines, to the Nairobi hub of Kenya Airways, and to Nigeria with Belleview and Virgin Nigeria. Both Ethiopian Airlines and Kenya Airways offer excellent connections to other African destinations as well as the Middle East.

  • The Waterside Market
  • The National Museum of Liberia
  • The Blo Degbo-- Rock formation shaped like a human face in Paynesville

Buy

Waterside Market.

Ranzeno. Fine men’s clothing. Tel: 00-231-6-530-799. Benson Street (Between Randall and Gurley Streets).

The Best Jewelry. For high-end African-inspired jewelry. Tel: 00-231-6-513-578. 15th Street and Tubman Blvd, Sinkhor.

Little Angels. Children’s clothes and supplies. Tel: 00-231-6-699-699. Randall Street, next to Computech.

Rima’s Fashions. Jewelry. Tel: 00-231-6-239-001. Randall Street.

Sorayah Laurice Fashion House. Customixzed tailoring and interior decorating. Tel: 00-231-0-82-78-49. Camp Johnson Road.

LIB Electronics. Electronics of all sorts. Tel: 00-231-6-530-057. 195 Broad Street. Aretha. Women’s fashions and accessories. Tel: 00-231-6-517-945. Gurley and Benson Streets.

Unboxed. Women’s shoes. Tel: 00-231-6-698-005. Broad Street.

Touba Art Center. Traditional arts and crafts. Tel: 00-231-6-373-939. Next to Cape Hotel on Mambo Point.

Picasso. Art. Tel: 00-231-7-7006-666. Randall Street.

Fuschia. Arts and crafts. 00-231-6-446-688. Randall Street, across from Stop and Shop Supermarket.

Eat

Dining options in Monrovia are pretty good, all things considered. Anything other than Lebanese and Liberian tends to be expensive, but there are a few reasonable places.

There are hundreds of "cook shops" serving Liberian fare, but if you're yearning for something other than spicy sauces and rice, you can try one of the following (in no particular order):

  • Boulevard Cafe. New, contemporary restaurant on Tubman and 14th Street. Good mix of atmosphere, food and drink. The menu has a variety of appetizers and different pastas. Live music on Friday nights. +231 (0) 6969969 +231 (0) 5123456 +232 (0) 77969969
  • Casablanca. Great Moroccan food at the top of Broad Street. Again, expensive, but tasty tagines (the chicken with raisins is particularly good.)
  • Diana's. Great lunch spot on Center Street. Great Lebanese sandwiches and falafel. +231 (0) 656 3333
  • Golden Beach Restaurant & Bar, 2nd Street (Sinkor region), (231)06-821-717. American owned Continental Restaurant that offers seafood, pizza and fine french dining from the head chef of Chez Christophe in San Francisco, CA. Enjoy your meal with custom seating directly on the beach. This is the only restaurant directly on the beach. This restaurant also offers after dark nightclub and bar that plays Top 40 in Hip Hop and RnB.  edit
  • Great Wall. Pretty good, authentic Chinese food on Tubman Boulevard. Hot pot (shabu shabu) available in the front room. Back room available for karaoke parties.
  • Le Griot Cafe Opposite the American Embassy is an outdoor bar/restaurant offering a daily African special and a Sunday Brunch ranging from African food to Southern Creole Buffet. Friday Happy Hour Grill Bar Wireless internet. Cell +231 7 155 242 or +231 6 815 242
  • Jamal's Pizzeria. Very reasonably priced, cute little pizza/Lebanese place on Center Street. Good for brunch, too. Salads a bit pricey. Cell +2316544100 or +2315841841
  • The Living Room (Royal Hotel Sushi Restaurant). Sinkor, between 14th and 15th Streets, on Tubman Boulevard. Expensive, especially for the mediocre sushi. Very nice, sleek atmosphere - you could almost be in New York. Almost. The Royal Hotel also has another Western/Lebanese restaurant, where the chicken burger is pretty good. Pirate (seafood) soup also not bad.
  • Mamba Point Hotel. The city's second sushi restaurant - food is comparable to sushi at the Royal.
  • Mona Liza. Reasonably priced, nice little ice cream parlor/pizza/sandwich shop in Sinkor. 15th Street.
  • Nour Restaurant. Good Lebanese on Center Street.

N’yla Café. African fusion food. Tel: 00-231-5-516-500. Bestman Road. Airfield, Sinkhor.

  • P.A.'s Rib House. Near Spriggs-Payne Airfield. Pretty good American-style barbecued ribs. Like most restaurants in Monrovia, service is a bit slow, and items on the menu are not always available.
  • Ro-zi's, [1]. Liberian fusion restaurant in airfield - you'll see the signs pointing the way off of Tubman Blvd. and Old Road. Excellent menu, charming "New York City meets West Africa" decor. Also caters and delivers.  edit

Sajj. Venerable Lebanese establishment with outdoor dining, a big screen TV, and wi-fi internet along with a wide-range of menu options. Tubman Blvd, Sinkhor.

  • Taaj. Indian food at 5th Street (beach side) and Tubman Boulevard. Great Baigan Bharta (eggplant). Home to expat trivia game on Thursday nights.

Self-catering

There are several supermarkets that sell imported (usually American, Lebanese, and some Western European) goods.

Abu Jaoudi (Randall Street) is the biggest of the bunch. Has decent bakery, deli, fish and meat counters. Produce is usually overpriced and tired looking.

Stop 'n' Shop (Randall Street) is small and crowded, but has a good assortment of groceries. Sometimes imports specialty items (i.e., strawberries.)

Monoprix (Benson Street) is conveniently located right by the good outdoor produce market in town.

Greenland (Tubman Boulevard, at ? Street.) Small and a bit dark, but it's the only one open on Sundays (morning only). Overpriced (but convenient) produce stands in front.

UN Drive Supermarket (Tubman Boulevard, between 15th and 16th Streets). Decent array of imported goods.

Exclusive Supermarket (Tubman Boulevard at 19th Street in Sinkhor). A well-stocked supermarket with many imported goods of international standards. Western cereals, energy drinks, and a wide range of wine are on sale. There is a small bakery offering sandwiches and Indian foods for take-away.

Drink

Nightclubs:

  • Agenda
  • Pepperbush
  • Zanzibar Blue
  • Deja Vu.  edit
  • Embassy.  edit
  • Groovie's.  edit

Sleep

Budget

St. Teresa's Convent, Randall Streets - the only hostel in the city - beds are $10-15/night.

  • Moko's Guest House, 00-231-77-515747; 00-231-6-515897 (). This guesthouse is located on a secure compound in Sinkhor. Prices include a generous and delicious breakfast of omelette, pancakes, or fish. Laundry services, cable television, and wireless internet are available. The staff are extremely attentive and competent. Aabout $80-100 per night.  edit
  • Greystone Suites Bed & Breakfast of Mamba Point, 1 Greystone Access Rd., 231 77 155242; 00-231-6-815242 (), [2]. One, two or three bedroom suites with 24-hr electricity, hot water, AC, wireless internet, DTSV, security, housekeeping and laundry. Opposite the American Embassy and the European Union building. Starting at $110USD per room or $250USD for an entire suite, monthly arrangements available..   edit
  • Krystal Oceanview, 1000 Mamba Point Road, Monrovia. Tel+231 651-0424 [3]. A Liberian-owned, family-run 30-room hotel overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, near several western embassies (US, EU, UN).
  • Mamba Point, Tel. +(231)226693/226452 fax. +(231) 26050. Mamba Point has 55 air conditioned rooms, TV, 24 hour electricity, a bar and an international restaurant. It's near the water and several of the western embassies and UN agencies. It also has wireless internet connection in the lounge.
  • Royal

Kendeja Resorts and Villas. Tel: 00-231-22-100-100. Website: www.rljkendejaresort.com Built by the owner of the US cable channel, Black Entertainment Television, is a luxury resort with spa and beach access.

The Renaissance Hotel. Tel: 00-231-6-552-200. Email: mickey06@yahoo.com. Boutique hotel and restaurant with cable television and restaurant.

The Cape Hotel. Tel: 00-231-6-429-947. Email: info@thecapehotel.com. Website: www.thecapehotel.com. Posh hotel with African-inspired décor at Mambo Point, next to the US Embassy.

Get out

Careysburg is a town founded by freed slaves in 1859, about 30 minutes from Monrovia. The sleepy city and nearby townships have examples of homes and churches built in the style of the American South, set against a cool, lush landscape. The Quelu and Wulki Farms both offer accommodations with swimming pools and horseback riding.

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Proper noun

Singular
Monrovia

Plural
-

Monrovia

  1. The capital of Liberia.

Simple English

Monrovia is the capital of Liberia. It is Liberia's most populous city with a population of 1,010,970.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message