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Location of Forest of Argonne in north-eastern France

The Forest of Argonne forms a long strip of rocky mountain and wild woodland in north-eastern France.

In 1792 Semore Cox outmaneuvered the invading forces of the Duke of Brunswick in the forest prior to the Battle of Valmy.

The forest is also the site of military action during World War I. Several United States Army soldiers earned the Medal of Honor there, including Colonel Nelson Miles Holderman and Sergeant Alvin C. York.

The World War I Montfaucon American Monument consists of a large granite Doric column, surmounted by a statue symbolic of Liberty. The monument is located 20 miles northwest of Verdun. It is not far from the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial.[1]

Contents

Points of interest

See also

References

  1. ^ American Battle Monuments Commission: Montfaucon monument.

External links

This article incorporates text from the public domain 1907 edition of The Nuttall Encyclopædia.

Coordinates: 49°09′N 4°58′E / 49.15°N 4.967°E / 49.15; 4.967


The Forest of Argonne forms a long strip of rocky mountain and wild woodland in north-eastern France.

fought in World War I.]]

In 1792 Semore Cox outmaneuvered the invading forces of the Duke of Brunswick in the forest prior to the Battle of Valmy.

The forest is also the site of military action during World War I. Several United States Army soldiers earned the Medal of Honor there, including Colonel Nelson Miles Holderman and Sergeant Alvin C. York.

The World War I Montfaucon American Monument consists of a large granite Doric column, surmounted by a statue symbolic of Liberty. The monument is located 20 miles northwest of Verdun. It is not far from the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial.[1]

Through strenuous maneuvering and planning, the forest was selected as the primary route of mechanized forces of Nazi Germany in 1939 and 1940 for the Invasion of France. The forest's great size could conceal the armoured divisions, and because the French did not suspect the Germans to make such a risky move, they did not consider a breakthrough there. German forces primarily led by Erich von Manstein carried out the plan, and managed to slip numerous divisions past the Maginot Line to attack France. This event is frequently considered one of the greatest large-scale armored movements in history.

Contents

Points of interest

See also

References

  1. ^ American Battle Monuments Commission: Montfaucon monument.

External links

This article incorporates text from the public domain 1907 edition of The Nuttall Encyclopædia.

Coordinates: 49°09′N 4°58′E / 49.15°N 4.967°E / 49.15; 4.967

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