Mount Porte Crayon: Wikis

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Mount Porte Crayon
Summit
Country  United States
State  West Virginia
County Pendleton, Randolph
Part of Allegheny Front
Range Allegheny Mountains
Elevation 4,770 ft (1,453.9 m) [1]
Prominence 1,590 ft (484.6 m) [2]
Coordinates 38°55′44″N 79°27′22″W / 38.92889°N 79.45611°W / 38.92889; -79.45611
Management Monongahela National Forest
Owner USDA Forest Service
Easiest access off-trail hike
Topo map USGS Laneville
Nearest city Harman, West Virginia
Location of Mount Porte Crayon in Virginia
Website: Monongahela National Forest

Mount Porte Crayon is a mountain in the Roaring Plains Wilderness of the Monongahela National Forest. It is situated in the extreme northeastern corner of Randolph County, West Virginia, USA and rises to an elevation of 4,770 feet (1,450 m).

Contents

Geography

The mountain is named for illustrator David Hunter Strother (1816-88), known as "Porte Crayon", who produced a wide array of West Virginia landscapes in his work. Mount Porte Crayon is the sixth highest point in the state of West Virginia and the northernmost of the top ten state highpoints. It is also the highest point on the Roaring Plains, a natural extension of the Dolly Sods Wilderness. The summit area is presently set aside as an 8.11-acre (32,800 m2) prescribed management area, and is a Research Natural Area, for a native mountaintop red spruce forest that is home to endangered northern flying squirrel and endangered Cheat Mountain salamander. Mount Porte Crayon is the remote headwaters to three drainages and is the highest point on the Eastern Continental Divide in West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.

Climate

Mount Porte Crayon is notorious for its inclement weather and strong winds. The prevailing westerly winds are so severe, they have deformed the red spruce trees, causing branches to grow on only one side. The summit itself is very isolated and difficult to access. Although some may make a summit bid into an overnight trip, experienced hikers with a map and compass and/or GPS can easily summit Mount Porte Crayon as a day hike.

Recreation

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Hiking

A trip to the summit using the Flat Rock Run Trail is a 5+ mile, 2,500-foot (762 m) gain endeavor. This includes over a half-mile bushwhack to the summit through some very thick spruce and rhododendron. Mount Porte Crayon is for experienced hikers only and should not be underestimated.

Ski resort plans

Mount Porte Crayon has been involved in controversy due to plans by Bill Bright, developer of the Winterplace and Glade Springs resorts, plans to bring a ski resort to the area.[3 ][4][5 ][6] The proposed ski area is rumored to be named "Almost Heaven Mountain Resort" and will have the largest vertical drop south of New York.[7]

References

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey. Laneville, West Virginia quadrangle [map], 1:24,000, 7.5-Minute Series (Topographic). (1995) ISBN 0-607-90826-2.
  2. ^ "West Virginia Summits". PeakList.org. Archived from the original on 2009-01-16. http://www.webcitation.org/5dsdeIkpq. Retrieved 2008-04-22.  
  3. ^ "W. Va. ski resort still in the works". Washington Times. 2003-10-12. Archived from the original on 2009-03-01. http://www.webcitation.org/5exPDvYLN. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  
  4. ^ Sherwood, John (2003-09-30). "Porte Crayon Ski Resort Considered". DCSki. Archived from the original on 2009-03-01. http://www.webcitation.org/5exMPTj0r. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  
  5. ^ "Porte Crayon ski resort planned". The Highlands Voice (West Virginia Highlands Conservancy): p. 3. 2003-09. Archived from the original on 2009-03-01. http://www.webcitation.org/5exORYkBo. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  
  6. ^ McGinnis, Helen (2004-09). "Bright assembles property for Almost Heaven Mountain Resort". The Highlands Voice (West Virginia Highlands Conservancy): p. 4. Archived from the original on 2009-03-01. http://www.webcitation.org/5exKIevG4. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  
  7. ^ Sherwood, John (2006-01-21). "Almost Heaven Mountain Resort Update". DCSki. Archived from the original on 2009-03-01. http://www.webcitation.org/5exKOhaPF. Retrieved 2009-03-01.  

External links


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