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Musca
Musca
List of stars in Musca
Abbreviation Mus
Genitive Muscae
Pronunciation /ˈmʌskə/, genitive /ˈmʌsiː/
Symbolism the Fly
Right ascension 12.456 h
Declination −70.341°
Family Bayer
Quadrant SQ3
Area 138 sq. deg. (77th)
Main stars 6
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars
13
Stars with planets 1
Stars brighter than 3.00m 1
Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly) 1
Brightest star α Mus (2.69m)
Nearest star Gliese 440
(15.07 ly, 4.62 pc)
Messier objects none
Meteor showers ?????
?????
Bordering
constellations
Apus
Carina
Centaurus
Chamaeleon
Circinus
Crux
Visible at latitudes between +10° and −90°.
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of May.

Musca (Latin: fly) is one of the minor southern constellations. The constellation was one of twelve constellations created by Petrus Plancius from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman and it first appeared on a 35-cm diameter celestial globe published in 1597 (or 1598) in Amsterdam by Petrus Plancius and Jodocus Hondius. The first depiction of this constellation in a celestial atlas was in Johann Bayer's Uranometria of 1603.

Contents

Notable objects

The soft X-ray transient Nova Muscae 1991 is a binary object consisting of a star and a black hole. During the 1991 outburst which led to its discovery, radiation was produced through a process of positron annihilation. Musca also contains the unusual planetary nebula NGC 5189, located about 3,000 light years from earth. Its uniquely complex structure resembles a miniature crab nebula. Also within the constellation is the Hourglass Nebula (MyCn 18) at a distance of about 8,000 light years. The comparatively old globular cluster NGC 4833 near Delta Muscae is 21,200 light years distant and somewhat obscured by dust clouds near the galactic plane. The globular cluster NGC 4372 near Gamma Muscae is fainter and likewise partially obscured by dust, but spans more arc minutes.

History

Musca, under its original name Apisthe Bee, was introduced in the late 16th century by Petrus Plancius to fill the previously uncharted area around the southern pole and to provide nourishment for the nearby constellation Chamaeleon (17th-century celestial maps clearly show the chameleon's tongue trying to catch the insect). In 1752 Nicolas Louis de Lacaille renamed it to Musca Australis, the Southern Fly – Australis, since it counterparted the now discarded constellation of Musca Borealis composed of a few stars in Aries, and to avoid confusion with Apus. Today the name is simply Musca. [1]

Citations

References

  • Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion (2007). Stars and Planets Guide, Collins, London. ISBN 978-0007251209. Princeton University Press, Princeton. ISBN 978-0691135564.
  • Thomas Wm. Hamilton, Useful Star Names, Holbrook, NY, Viewlex, 1968.

External links

Coordinates: Sky map 12h 27m 36s, −70° 20′ 24″

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also musca

Contents

Translingual

Etymology

Latin musca, "fly"

Proper noun

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Musca

  1. (zoology): A zoological name at the rank of genus in the family Muscidae. The housefly belongs to the genus Musca.
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See also

  • Muscidae
  • Muscinae

English

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Etymology

Named by Dutch explorers Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman between 1595 and 1597. From Latin musca, a "fly".

Proper noun

Singular
Musca

Plural
-

Musca

  1. (astronomy) An autumn constellation of the southern sky, said to resemble a fly. It lies between the constellations of Carina and Apus.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of acmsu
  • sumac

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Musca domestica (copula)

Taxonavigation

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Unikonta
Cladus: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Cladus: Ecdysozoa
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Classis: Insecta
Cladus: Dicondylia
Cladus: Pterygota
Cladus: Metapterygota
Cladus: Neoptera
Cladus: Eumetabola
Cladus: Endopterygota
Superordo: Panorpida
Cladus: Antliophora
Ordo: Diptera
Subordo: Brachycera
Infraordo: Muscomorpha
Sectio: Schizophora
Subsectio: Calyptrata
Superfamilia: Muscoidea
Familia: Muscidae
Subfamilia: Muscinae
Tribus: Muscini
Genus: Musca
Species: M. autumnalis - M. domestica - M. vetustissima

Name

Musca Linnaeus, 1758

References


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