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Myopathy
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 G71.-G72., M60.-M63.
ICD-9 359.4-359.9, 728-728
DiseasesDB 8723
eMedicine emerg/328
MeSH D009135

In medicine, a myopathy is a muscular disease [1] in which the muscle fibers do not function for any one of many reasons, resulting in muscular weakness. "Myopathy" simply means muscle disease (myo- Greek μυσ "muscle" + pathos -pathy Greek "suffering"). This meaning implies that the primary defect is within the muscle, as opposed to the nerves ("neuropathies" or "neurogenic" disorders) or elsewhere (e.g., the brain etc.). Muscle cramps, stiffness, and spasm can also be associated with myopathy.

Muscular disease can be classified as neuromuscular or musculoskeletal in nature.

Some conditions, such as myositis, can be considered both neuromuscular and musculoskeletal.

Contents

Classes

Because myopathy is such a general term, there are several classes of myopathy.... (ICD-10 codes are provided where available.)

Congenital

Acquired

  • (M33.0-M33.1)
    • Dermatomyositisis the same as polymyositis, but also shows skin changes - a violaceous periorbital rash, facial erythema, blue or red patches on the knuckles, ragged nail folds and dilated nail capilliaries. (M33.2)
    • polymyositis which has tender, weak muscles, a mild normocytic anaemia, raised creatinine kinase and inflammatory markers and shows short polyphasic action potentials on EMG. it is treated by immunosuppressants like corticosteroids or azathioprine.
    • inclusion body myositis, and related myopathies
  • (M61) Myositis ossificans
  • (M62.89) Rhabdomyolysis and (R82.1) myoglobinurias
  • Alcoholic myopathy, can result due to the long-term effects of alcohol abuse. Impaired IGF-1 signaling is one mechanism which is believed to be involved.[2]

Symptoms

Treatments

Because different types of myopathies are caused by many different pathways, there is no single treatment for myopathy. Treatments range from treatment of the symptoms to very specific cause-targeting treatments. Drug therapy, physical therapy, bracing for support, surgery, and even acupuncture are current treatments for a variety of myopathies.

References

  1. ^ "Myopathy - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary". http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Myopathy.  
  2. ^ Ronis, MJ.; Wands, JR.; Badger, TM.; de la Monte, SM.; Lang, CH.; Calissendorff, J. (Aug 2007). "Alcohol-induced disruption of endocrine signaling.". Alcohol Clin Exp Res 31 (8): 1269-85. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2007.00436.x. PMID 17559547.  







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