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Prometheus (1868 by Gustave Moreau). The myth of Prometheus was first attested by Hesiodus and then constituted the basis for a tragic trilogy of plays, possibly by Aeschylus, consisting of Prometheus Bound, Prometheus Unbound and Prometheus Pyrphoros
.The term mythology can refer to either the study of myths or a body of myths.^ B'se > it looks like the author is calling them, myth on his own accord > B'se based on these, Religions texts have been termed myth and > mythology.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ B'se it looks like the author is calling them, myth on his own accord B'se based on these, Religions texts have been termed myth and mythology.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Compares the Indian creation myth "'Rig-Veda X, cxxix: 'In the Beginning'" with Genesis, Chaper I. Excellent for those studying mythology, religion, philosophy, Western Civ.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

[1] .For example, comparative mythology is the study of connections between myths from different cultures,[2] whereas Greek mythology is the body of myths from ancient Greece.^ Ancient Greece Mythology Links and information on ancient Greek myth ology.

^ My first collection of mythology was a lavishly illustrated book discussing the Deities and myths of Ancient Greece.
  • Myth - CLOSED - Financial District - San Francisco, CA 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ Gods This site is designed to draw together the ancient texts and images available on the Web concerning the major figures of Greek and Roman myth ology.

.The term "myth" is often used colloquially to refer to a false story;[3][4] however, the academic use of the term generally does not pass judgment on its truth or falsity.^ The rule I’ve generally used to deal with this request is “does the topology easily support it?” If their server is on a LAN with 20 /24’s already on it then sure, they can have 20 IPs from 20 /24’s.
  • Myth busting: virtual hosts vs. dedicated IP addresses 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.mattcutts.com [Source type: General]

^ Passing from the lower savage myths, of which space does not permit us to offer a larger selection, we turn to races in the upper strata of barbarism.

^ This story is but one specimen of the personal human character of animals in myths, already referred to the intellectual condition of savages.

[4][5] .In the study of folklore, a myth is a religious narrative explaining how the world and humankind came to be in their present form.^ The content of Mark is a collection of myths and legends put together to form a continuous narrative.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Even without knowing the law this myth is debunked with simple logic: Think about it; how many people are there in the world with the name, “John Smith”?
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Stephan Stenudd critiques the Jungian analysis of Myths of Creation in this essay Deborah Scherrer has collected an number of myths and Solar Folklore from around the world for the Stanford Solar Center.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[5][6][7] .Many scholars in other fields use the term "myth" in somewhat different ways.^ It is extremely difficult to keep these different categories of myths separate from each other.

^ See: SuperMemo is Useless Myth: Many people are successful without using SuperMemo, hence its importance is secondary.
  • Memory and Learning: Myths and Truths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.supermemo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you eat seafood and dine at Myth with others who do, you will be in an optimal position as many of the most exciting items on the menu include fish and/or seafood.
  • Myth - CLOSED - Financial District - San Francisco, CA 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

[7][8][9] .In a very broad sense, the word can refer to any traditional story.^ The Marathon Story Page The Marathon Addendum : Our very own list of Marathon references in Halo, both blatant and sly.
  • Halo Story Page | Ancillary | Marathon Connections 31 January 2010 12:21 UTC halostory.bungie.org [Source type: Original source]

[10]

Contents

Nature of myths

Typical characteristics

.The main characters in myths are usually gods or supernatural heroes.^ Nymphs were sometimes worshipped alongside with the gods or heroes in their temples or sanctuaries, though these cults of the nymphs were usually found in caves.

^ Though animals, these gods have human passions and character, and possess the usual magical powers attributed to sorcerers.

^ BoXo'yia, the science which examines pihot, myths or legends of cosmogony and of gods and heroes.

[11][12][13] .As sacred stories, myths are often endorsed by rulers and priests and closely linked to religion.^ I like the word "myth" and how it carries with it an air of fantasy, a place in history and the figment of imagination often linked to legends.
  • Myth - CLOSED - Financial District - San Francisco, CA 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ Macdonell, Arthur Anthony calls Vedas and other religions Hindu text > myth and stories on this own accord.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Closely as religion and myth are intertwined, it is necessary to hold them apart for the purposes of this discussion.

[11] .In the society in which it is told, a myth is usually regarded as a true account of the remote past.^ Though, the societies in post-Dorian Invasion Greece were predominantly filled with myths about male heroes, some myths still survived about the heroines from the mythical past.

[11][12][14][15] .In fact, many societies have two categories of traditional narrative—(1) "true stories", or myths, and (2) "false stories", or fables.^ Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley presents Yupiaq Education Revisited , a page which includes information on the traditional beliefs and myths of the Yupiaq Eskimos, including a tale of the "Two Brothers".
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Amy Lowell retells the story of Many Swans: Sun Myth of the North American Indians based on the Kathlamet legend, in a journal article from 1920.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The paper looks at the many correspondences between Eliot’s narrative and Virgil’s, and concludes that they are approaching the same goal on two different paths.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[16] .Myths generally take place in a primordial age, when the world had not yet achieved its current form.^ Both kinds tell of a primordial age before the world became as it is now, a time when finite divisions between humans, animals, and spirits had not yet been created and beings could transform themselves from one form into another.
  • The Thomas Jefferson-Sally Hemings Myth and the Politicization of American History by David N. Mayer 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.ashbrook.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the South Sea Islands, generally, the fable of the union and separation of Heaven and Earth is current; other forms will be found in Gill's Myths and Songs from the South Pacific.

^ C.E. Its earliest form consisted of moral teachings and predictions of the destruction of the current world order.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11] .They explain how the world gained its current form[5][6][7][17] and how customs, institutions, and taboos were established.^ Did anyone see the news on England saying how sorry they were for it's hospitals having 3rd world health care.
  • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "Did anyone see the news on England saying how sorry they were for it's hospitals having 3rd world health care.
  • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ How else to explain the stupidity of announcing to the world the desire to become a repeat offender?

[11][17]

Related concepts

.Closely related to myth are legend and folktale.^ Oban retells assorted Animal, Myths, Legends, and Folktales from around the world, with illustrations.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mire Uno translates those sections of that work relating to Miyazaki Prefecture in Myth and Legends in Miyazaki: Kojiki .
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Myths, legends, and folktales are different types of traditional story.^ It is emphasized that different tribes each had their own brand of myth -- Analyzed in specific detail are the myths of the Aztecs who, in their stories, formulated an entire structure for their universe.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Migratory legends of type 6045 and other stories of drinking vessels stolen from or abandoned by fairies.
  • Folktexts: A library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology, page 1 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A myth is a traditional story accepted as history > > > > > vedas where never stories.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[18] .Unlike myths, folktales can take place at any time and any place, and they are not considered true or sacred events by the societies that tell them.^ I’ve been trying to explain to some folks for some time that they didn’t need to split up their network all over the place.
  • Myth busting: virtual hosts vs. dedicated IP addresses 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.mattcutts.com [Source type: General]

^ To discuss these myths as far as they can be considered apart from divine and explanatory tales would demand more space than we have at our disposal.

^ Passover occurs at the time of the Vernal Equinox, an event considered important by astrologers during the Roman Empire.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11] .Like myths, legends are stories that are traditionally considered true; however, they are set in a more recent time, when the world was much as it is today.^ Saddam Hussein, we all know, is a monster, like many dictators in the world today.
  • *�* Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Myths of the War on Terrorism and Iraq |Powell Laden tape lie, Iraq war lies, myths Bush terrorism Blair media PR public relationsspin war wag the dog weapons destruction 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In particular, the story about Mark obtained from John the Elder is nothing more than a slight elaboration of the legend about Mark found in Acts and so it tells us nothing about the true origins of the Gospel of Mark .
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I like the word "myth" and how it carries with it an air of fantasy, a place in history and the figment of imagination often linked to legends.
  • Myth - CLOSED - Financial District - San Francisco, CA 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

[11] .Also, legends generally feature humans as their main characters, whereas myths generally focus on superhuman characters.^ Their myths and the key characters featured in them are explicated.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From the on-line zine Thirteen comes this feature on Scottish Myth and Legend which includes stories of the King of the Fairies, the Brownies, Prince Ian, and the Black bull of Norroway.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the comparison of the legends of the origin of the world it has been seen that Samoa presented special features, and in its most generally received version of the provenance of man it shows a similar individuality and offers the best form of the last of the types of myths relating to human origins.
  • Oceanic Mythology: Part I. Polynesia: Chapter I. Myths of Origins and the Deluge 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

[11]
.The distinction between myth, legend, and folktale is meant simply as a useful tool for grouping traditional stories.^ A myth is a traditional story accepted as history > > > > > vedas where never stories.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Particularists reject any accommodation among groups, any interactions that blur the distinct lines between them.
  • The Thomas Jefferson-Sally Hemings Myth and the Politicization of American History by David N. Mayer 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.ashbrook.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A myth is a traditional story accepted as history > > vedas where never stories.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[19] .In many cultures, it is hard to draw a sharp line between myths and legends.^ As far as the New Testament goes, many also draw a parallel between Dumuzi and Jesus because Dumuzi is a shepherd-king and he is resurrected from the dead.
  • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (Zeus was a cuckoo), but to survivals from that quality of early thought which draws no line between man and god and beast and bird and fish.

^ In the Puranas we find the legend of many successive creations and destructions of the world a myth of world-wide distribution.

[20] .Instead of dividing their traditional stories into myths, legends, and folktales, some cultures divide them into two categories — one that roughly corresponds to folktales, and one that combines myths and legends.^ I have divided the Titans into two.

^ Myths of unknown antiquity, for example, have been attracted into the legend of Charlemagne , just as the bons mots of old wits are transferred to living humorists.

^ The Underworld was divided into two or more main regions.

[21] .Even myths and folktales are not completely distinct: a story may be considered true — and therefore a myth — in one society, but considered fictional — and therefore a folktale — in another society.^ Once the X angle was exposed as a complete hoax (by one of Peltier’s accomplices), Peltier had to change his story.

^ This story is but one specimen of the personal human character of animals in myths, already referred to the intellectual condition of savages.

^ Myth: Iraq is a major nuclear threat Comment: Even the UN weapons inspectors and Iraqs detractors agree that Iraq has not one nuclear weapon.
  • *�* Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Myths of the War on Terrorism and Iraq |Powell Laden tape lie, Iraq war lies, myths Bush terrorism Blair media PR public relationsspin war wag the dog weapons destruction 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[22][23] .In fact, when a myth loses its status as part of a religious system, it often takes on traits more typical of folktales, with its formerly divine characters reinterpreted as human heroes, giants, or fairies.^ To do so is to lose part of our own humanity.
  • *�* Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Myths of the War on Terrorism and Iraq |Powell Laden tape lie, Iraq war lies, myths Bush terrorism Blair media PR public relationsspin war wag the dog weapons destruction 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Fact: This is more of a misnomer than a myth.
  • Memory and Learning: Myths and Truths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.supermemo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Respecting myths as a part of human culture ‹#› .
  • tantek/log/2002/12 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC tantek.com [Source type: General]

[12]
.Myth, legend, and folktale are only a few of the categories of traditional stories.^ A myth is a traditional story accepted as history > > > > > vedas where never stories.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The science of mythology has to account, if it can, not only for the existence of certain stories in the legends of certain races, but also for the presence of stories practically the same among almost all races.

^ A myth is a traditional story accepted as history > > vedas where never stories.
  • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Other categories include anecdotes and some kinds of jokes.[19] .Traditional stories, in turn, are only one category within folklore, which also includes items such as gestures, costumes, and music.^ Such a compromise would affect only one account on a Multics machine, not the whole computer, unless the account belonged to a highly privileged user.
  • Myths about Multics 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.multicians.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This story is a vicious antisemitic lie, one of many such lies found in the New Testament (largely written by antisemites).
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Or maybe because I sometimes write only one entry for a day, in only one category, thus resulting in three permalinks that appear to refer to the same entry.
  • tantek/log/2002/12 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC tantek.com [Source type: General]

[23]

Origins of myth

Euhemerism

.One theory claims that myths are distorted accounts of real historical events.^ They claimed that the Talmudic Yeishu was a distortion of the "historical Jesus."
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Once Tacitus is dismissed, the Christians will claim that one of the younger Pliny's letters to the emperor Trajan provides evidence of an historical Jesus.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ One wonders if inmate #89637-132, in quiet moments of mandatory rest time, realizes that three decades of myth-making were all for naught.

[24][25] .According to this theory, storytellers repeatedly elaborated upon historical accounts until the figures in those accounts gained the status of gods.^ According to the early Roman accounts, Mars was known more as a god of agriculture than that of war.

^ Nor can the esoteric and pantheistic theories of priests (according to which the various beast-gods were symbolic manifestations of the divine essence) be received as an historical account of the origin of the local animal-worships.

^ According to accounts attributed to Berosus, the antediluvians were giants who became impious and depraved, except one among them that reverenced the gods and was wise and prudent.
  • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

[24][25] .For example, one might argue that the myth of the wind-god Aeolus evolved from a historical account of a king who taught his people to use sails and interpret the winds.^ By the goddess Eos , he was the father of Boreas , Zephyrus and Notus - gods of winds (see also Aeolus , for more detail about the wind gods.

^ One study pegged the number of people who were uninsured for the entire year at 31 million, while another put it even lower, at 21 million.
  • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The people who say it can’t be done should not interrupt the ones who are diligently doing it.
  • The Seven Myths of Energy Independence | Mother Jones 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC motherjones.com [Source type: Original source]

[24] .Herodotus ( 5th century BC ) and Prodicus made claims of this kind.^ Tektas Burnu Shipwreck reports on the underwater excavation of a 5th century BC Aegean shipwreck by Texas A&M's George Bass .
  • Ancient Greek Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC greekmyth.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Scylla Carving from Milos, 5th century BC British Museum, London .

[25] .This theory is named "euhemerism" after the novelist Euhemerus (c.320 BC), who suggested that the Greek gods developed from legends about human beings.^ The original Greek for "Luke" is "Lykos" which was another name for Apollo, the god of healing.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Banks Islands are chiefly ancestor-worshippers, but they also believe in, and occasionally pray to, a being named I Qat, one of the prehuman race endowed with supernatural powers who here, as elsewhere, do duty as gods.

^ It wasn't until the Romans identified him with Greek Poseidon (399 BC), that he became the great god of the sea.

[25][26]

Allegory

.Some theories propose that myths began as allegories.^ Then something happened; and, some of the people began to learn, from third party sources, of conspiracy theories and or fraud and collusion in our government.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

.According to one theory, myths began as allegories for natural phenomena: Apollo represents fire, Poseidon represents water, and so on.^ Angry that he lost the city to his sister, Poseidon caused the water to dry up in one season, and to flood Argos in another.

^ Apollo , Helios, and Hephaestus were fire, Hera was air , Poseidon was water, Artemis was the moon , Kai Ta Xoora 6Aoiws.

^ According to one myth, two snakes were attacking one another, but when Hermes separated the snakes with his staff, they made peace.

[25] .According to another theory, myths began as allegories for philosophical or spiritual concepts: Athena represents wise judgment, Aphrodite represents desire, etc.^ The rational myths are those which represent the gods as beautiful and wise beings.

^ Another would detect moral allegory alone, and Aristotle expresses the opinion that the myths were the inventions of legislators " to persuade the many, and to be used in support of law " ( Met.

^ According to one myth, two snakes were attacking one another, but when Hermes separated the snakes with his staff, they made peace.

[25] .The 19th century Sanskritist Max Müller supported an allegorical theory of myth.^ But Max Muller's system is based on scientific philology, not on conjecture, and is supported by a theory of the various processes in the evolution of myths out of language.

.He believed that myths began as allegorical descriptions of nature, but gradually came to be interpreted literally: for example, a poetic description of the sea as "raging" was eventually taken literally, and the sea was then thought of as a raging god.^ Richard McLaughlin's Mythology Notes present descriptions of gods, summaries of myths, and some historical material on the mythologies of the Ancient Near East, Persia, Scandinavia, and the Celts.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However, the story of the twelve apostles lost its original allegorical interpretation and the Christians began to think that the "twelve apostles" were twelve real people who followed Jesus.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Since her disruptive nature to cause strife, even among the gods, so she was not invited to the wedding of the hero Peleus and the sea-goddess Thetis .

[27]

Personification

.Some thinkers believe that myths resulted from the personification of inanimate objects and forces.^ There are some myths that arise as a result of believing early documentation: Myth: Multics used multiple processes per user, and a two process debugger.
  • Myths about Multics 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.multicians.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.According to these thinkers, the ancients worshipped natural phenomena such as fire and air, gradually coming to describe them as gods.^ From these sources come almost all the more inhuman, bestial and discreditable myths of the gods.

^ Thus Indra is mainly concerned with thunder and other atmospheric phenomena; but Vayu is the wind, the Maruts are wind-gods, Agni is fire or the god of fire, and so connected with lightning.

^ Nymphs were sometimes worshipped alongside with the gods or heroes in their temples or sanctuaries, though these cults of the nymphs were usually found in caves.

[28] .For example, according to the theory of mythopoeic thought, the ancients tended to view things as persons, not as mere objects;[29] thus, they described natural events as acts of personal gods, thus giving rise to myths.^ But they frame their stories, necessarily and naturally, in harmony with their general theory of things, with what we may call " savage metaphysics ."

^ (For what it's worth, I tend to agree with Mike and others here that patents may be granted to liberally and are prone to give rise to sometimes absurd litigation.
  • The Myth Of The Original Content Creator | Techdirt 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.techdirt.com [Source type: General]

^ Maui himself is thought by E. B. Tylor to be a myth of the sun, but the sun could hardly give the sun a drubbing.

[30]

The myth-ritual theory

.According to the myth-ritual theory, the existence of myth is tied to ritual.^ So much for the Indian cosmogonic myths, which are a collection of ideas familiar to savages, blended with sacerdotal theories and ritual mummeries.

[31] .In its most extreme form, this theory claims that myths arose to explain rituals.^ The senseless element in the myths would by this theory be for the most part a " survival."

^ So much for the Indian cosmogonic myths, which are a collection of ideas familiar to savages, blended with sacerdotal theories and ritual mummeries.

^ Many Greek myths, most derogatory to the dignity of Demeter, Dionysus, Zeus or Hera, arose in the same way, as explanations of buffooneries in the Eleusinian or other mysteries.

[32] .This claim was first put forward by the biblical scholar William Robertson Smith.^ What are not legitimate concerns are those being put forward claiming a public option is somehow a Trojan horse for a single-payer system.
  • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[33] .According to Smith, people begin performing rituals for some reason that is not related to myth; later, after they have forgotten the original reason for a ritual, they try to account for the ritual by inventing a myth and claiming that the ritual commemorates the events described in that myth.^ As their video suggests, we the People can unite, but not on principles of rebellion as they imply; rather, on the principles of law and history that show us how to reseat our government in accord with law.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I’ve been trying to explain to some folks for some time that they didn’t need to split up their network all over the place.
  • Myth busting: virtual hosts vs. dedicated IP addresses 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.mattcutts.com [Source type: General]

^ Some of the originators of these myths may have had good intentions; they may have simply misunderstood the language of law or failed to follow the facts, law, history and simple logic.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

[34] The anthropologist James Frazer had a similar theory. .Frazer believed that primitive man starts out with a belief in magical laws; later, when man begins to lose faith in magic, he invents myths about gods and claims that his formerly magical rituals are religious rituals intended to appease the gods.^ Early man, living in a state of endless warfare, naturally believes that his gods also have their battles.

^ Even without knowing the law this myth is debunked with simple logic: Think about it; how many people are there in the world with the name, “John Smith”?
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If you want to know the truth about the Federal Reserve System check out Myth 22 .
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

[35]

Functions of myth

.One of the foremost functions of myth is to establish models for behavior.^ In one myth, the Olympic Games were actually first established in Olympus, by Zeus.

[36][37] .The figures described in myth are sacred and are therefore worthy role models for human beings.^ The second type of myth, that, namely, which recounts the creation of a female human being and her marriage to her creator, is found in numerous versions.
  • Oceanic Mythology: Part I. Polynesia: Chapter I. Myths of Origins and the Deluge 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The question of the origin of the marks and characteristics of various animals and plants has also produced a class of myths in which the marks are said to survive from some memorable adventure, or the plants and animals to be metamorphosed human beings.

[37] .Thus, myths often function to uphold current social structures and institutions: they justify these customs by claiming that they were established by sacred beings.^ Thus Indians are spread all over the country, but their common songs and customs show that they are one people.
  • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the originators of these myths may have had good intentions; they may have simply misunderstood the language of law or failed to follow the facts, law, history and simple logic.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To discuss these myths as far as they can be considered apart from divine and explanatory tales would demand more space than we have at our disposal.

[38][39] Myths can be entertaining.
Another function is to provide people with a religious experience. .By retelling myths, human beings detach themselves from the present and return to the mythical age, thereby bringing themselves closer to the divine.^ The question of the origin of the marks and characteristics of various animals and plants has also produced a class of myths in which the marks are said to survive from some memorable adventure, or the plants and animals to be metamorphosed human beings.

^ In the same way the adoration of living human beings, the deification of living kings - whose title survives in our king or queen of the May, and in the rex nemorensis, the priest of Diana in the grove of Aricia - has been most fruitful in myths of divine beings.

^ In these works the myths are taken for granted, are alluded to in the course of addresses to the divine beings, but, naturally, are not told in full.

[14][37][40] .In fact, in some cases, a society will reenact a myth in an attempt to reproduce the conditions of the mythical age: for example, it will reenact the healing performed by a god at the beginning of time in order to heal someone in the present.^ Though, the societies in post-Dorian Invasion Greece were predominantly filled with myths about male heroes, some myths still survived about the heroines from the mythical past.

^ Some of the originators of these myths may have had good intentions; they may have simply misunderstood the language of law or failed to follow the facts, law, history and simple logic.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In some myths, Persephone appeared to be more of the ruler of the Underworld than Hades himself, and in some cases Hades doesn't appeared at all.

[41]

The study of mythology: a historical overview

.Historically, the important approaches to the study of mythology have been those of Vico, Schelling, Schiller, Jung, Freud, Lévy-Bruhl, Lévi-Strauss, Frye, the Soviet school, and the Myth and Ritual School.^ Compares the Indian creation myth "'Rig-Veda X, cxxix: 'In the Beginning'" with Genesis, Chaper I. Excellent for those studying mythology, religion, philosophy, Western Civ.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Whatever may be said, Frazer has certainly made the most important of recent contributions to the study of mythology.

^ This paper also demonstrates the way in which culture determines the roles of women, and utilizes a variety of mythologies, from the myths of medieval England to those of ancient Greece, to demonstrate the depiction of these roles.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

[42]
This section describes trends in the interpretation of mythology in general. .For interpretations of specific similarities and parallels between the myths of different cultures, see Comparative mythology.^ It is emphasized that different tribes each had their own brand of myth -- Analyzed in specific detail are the myths of the Aztecs who, in their stories, formulated an entire structure for their universe.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1872, John Fiske wrote a "somewhat rambling and unsystematic series of papers" entitled Myths and Mythmakers: Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology .
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ See also Biblical Parallels in Sumerian Mythology VIII. Where did you get this info and where can I find out more?
  • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

Pre-modern theories

.The critical interpretation of myth goes back as far as the Presocratics.^ As one goes through the poems, one is ever and anon face to face with a myth of the most childish and barbaric type," which " carries one back to prae-Aryan days."

[43] .Euhemerus was one of the most important pre-modern mythologists.^ But, while there is now universal agreement so far, modern mythologists differed essentially on one point.

^ Oxyrhynchus - an exhibition a nice exhibition on one of the most important sites for Greek papyri - history, methodology, finds etc.
  • Ancient Greek Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC greekmyth.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He interpreted myths as accounts of actual historical events, distorted over many retellings.^ Amy Lowell retells the story of Many Swans: Sun Myth of the North American Indians based on the Kathlamet legend, in a journal article from 1920.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Donavon Marais of the University of South Africa presents his paper on The Cain Myth: a discussion of its historical roots and an interpretation .
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Varro distinguished three aspects of theology, besides political (social) and natural (physical) approaches to the divine allowing for a mythical theology.[citation needed]
.Interest in polytheistic mythology revived in the Renaissance, with early works on mythography appearing in the 16th century, such as the Theologia mythologica (1532).^ (Broken Link 2/14/02) Writing in the last half of the eighth century B.C.E. or perhaps the early 7th century B.C.E., Hesiod presents the earliest written works of Greek Mythology.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Village Fox, has assembled a Hebrew Mythology Library which explores some of the Genesis stories such as those of creation and the early patriarchs.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

19th-century theories

.The first scholarly theories of myth appeared during the second half of the 19th century.^ The non-canonical Apocalypse of Peter (written some time in the first quarter of the second century C.E.) is recognized as being non-historical even by fundamentalist Christians.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Papias was the bishop of Hierapolis (near Ephesus) during the middle of the second century C.E. None of his writings have survived but the Christian historian Eusebius (c.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The Gospel of Matthew was originally anonymous and was only assigned the name Matthew some time during the first half of the second century C.E. The earliest form was probably written at more or less the same time as the Gospel of Luke (c.
  • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

[43] .In general, these 19th-century theories framed myth as a failed or obsolete mode of thought, often by interpreting myth as the primitive counterpart of modern science.^ Some of the originators of these myths may have had good intentions; they may have simply misunderstood the language of law or failed to follow the facts, law, history and simple logic.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But they frame their stories, necessarily and naturally, in harmony with their general theory of things, with what we may call " savage metaphysics ."

^ Some of these myths are rooted in general myths of memory (as above).
  • Memory and Learning: Myths and Truths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.supermemo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[44]
.For example, E. B. Tylor interpreted myth as an attempt at a literal explanation for natural phenomena: unable to conceive of impersonal natural laws, early man tried to explain natural phenomena by attributing souls to inanimate objects, giving rise to animism.^ Early man, living in a state of endless warfare, naturally believes that his gods also have their battles.

^ Symbols of Vietnam explains the legendary nature of those objects in its title.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The explanations for the earlier trends have been provided: for the early warming, a mix of natural and CO2; for the cooling, naural variability and sulphates and a bit of other stuff - William] .
  • RealClimate: The global cooling myth 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.realclimate.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[45] .According to Tylor, human thought evolves through various stages, starting with mythological ideas and gradually progressing to scientific ideas.^ The writer covers various instances of trouble and hardship endured by Odysseus throughout his journey and finds that what he went through represented but a part of the "human experience."
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ To this we may answer that the human mind had to pass through the savage stage of thought, that this stage was for all practical purposes " identically the same " everywhere, and that to civilized observers it does resemble " a temporary madness."

^ According to Campbell, mythology represents ancient intuitive understanding of certain archetypal or "elementary ideas" that still speak to the human condition even in modern times.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

Not all scholars — not even all 19th century scholars — have agreed with this view. For example, Lucien Lévy-Bruhl claimed that "the primitive mentality is a condition of the human mind, and not a stage in its historical development."[46]
.Max Müller called myth a "disease of language". He speculated that myths arose due to the lack of abstract nouns and neuter gender in ancient languages: anthropomorphic figures of speech, necessary in such languages, were eventually taken literally, leading to the idea that natural phenomena were conscious beings, gods.^ Come, let us go down, and there make such a babble of their language that they will not understand one another's speech."
  • Mythical Man-Month Book Summary 20 November 2009 9:49 UTC javatroopers.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This being is rather a culture-hero, a member of a non-natural race of men like Qat or Manabozho, than a god.

^ Thus Max Muller's theory that myths are " a disease of language " seems destitute of evidence, and inconsistent with what is historically known about the relations between the language and the social, political and literary condition of men.

[47]
.The anthropologist James Frazer saw myths as a misinterpretation of magical rituals, which were themselves based on a mistaken idea of natural law.^ We find, too, that political power, sway and social influence are based on the ideas of magic, of metamorphosis, and of the power which certain men possess to talk with the dead and to visit the abodes of death.

^ So much for the Indian cosmogonic myths, which are a collection of ideas familiar to savages, blended with sacerdotal theories and ritual mummeries.

[48] .According to Frazer, man begins with an unfounded belief in impersonal magical laws.^ Magic and Religion; Dennett, At the Back of the Black Man's Mind; Junod, Les Barotsa; Spieth, Die Ewe -Stamme; Frazer, The Golden Bough.

.When he realizes that his applications of these laws don't work, he gives up his belief in natural law, in favor of a belief in personal gods controlling nature — thus giving rise to religious myths.^ For the rest, keep up the good work and don't give up to fanboys."
  • Firefox Myths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: General]

^ Thus these purely natural agents will come to be " personalized " ( Prin.

^ To prevent Plutus from bestowing wealth to one person or another as he choose, Zeus blinded the young god, so that he would give wealth to a person, no matter if the person was good or wicked.

.Meanwhile, man continues practicing formerly magical rituals through force of habit, reinterpreting them as reenactments of mythical events.^ The young man, though, had a magical white stone which, when he threw it ahead of him, clove a smooth path through the billows.
  • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

.Finally, Frazer contends, man realizes that nature does follow natural laws, but now he discovers their true nature through science.^ If you understand each of the seven elements listed above you now know the basics of how federal reserve notes work and the true nature of the “New Deal” Corp.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Check out the facts, the history and the law and test it for yourself against what we presented here; discover if it is not true.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Once more, even if we discover the original meaning of a god's name, it does not follow that we can explain by aid of the significance of the name the myths about the god.

Here, again, science makes myth obsolete: as Frazer puts it, man progresses "from magic through religion to science".[35]
.By pitting mythical thought against modern scientific thought, such theories implied that modern man must abandon myth.^ The wife thought the fish must be exceptionally good to eat, but the husband said he had promised the old man to keep it and made the woman swear not to eat it.
  • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The objection rests on the theory that myths are a disease of language, a morbid offshoot of language, and that the legends in unconnected languages must therefore be kept apart.

^ But Max Muller's system is based on scientific philology, not on conjecture, and is supported by a theory of the various processes in the evolution of myths out of language.

[49]

20th-century theories

.Many 20th-century theories of myth rejected the 19th-century theories' opposition of myth and science.^ Many of the myths of the origin of the divine beings are on a level with the Maori theory that Heaven and Earth begat them in the ordinary way.

.In general, "twentieth-century theories have tended to see myth as almost anything but an outdated counterpart to science […] Consequently, moderns are not obliged to abandon myth for science."^ See A. Lang, Magic and Religion (London, 1901), for a criticism in detail of the general theory as set forth in The Golden Bough.

^ Century, 1892) have not been successful (see Lang, Magic and Religion, " The Theory of Loan Gods ") and N.W.Thomas in Man (1905), v., 49 et seq.

[49]
.Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1873-1961) and his followers tried to understand the psychology behind world myths.^ If we try beginning with myths of the origin of the world, we frequently find that it owes its origin to the activity of preexistent supernatural beings.

^ The part of this myth that is true is the part where those following this myth understand that the entity people perceive as government is not our government as it was organized in our national Constitution.
  • Patriot Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC teamlaw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If we try beginning with myths of creative gods, we find that the world is sometimes represented as pre-existent to the divine race.

.Jung argued that all humans share certain innate unconscious psychological forces, which he called archetypes.^ According to Campbell, mythology represents ancient intuitive understanding of certain archetypal or "elementary ideas" that still speak to the human condition even in modern times.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

.Jung believed that the similarities between the myths from different cultures reveals the existence of these universal archetypes.^ Hixie agrees about the difference between myths and science and raises a point about their impacts on children.
  • tantek/log/2002/12 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC tantek.com [Source type: General]

^ It is emphasized that different tribes each had their own brand of myth -- Analyzed in specific detail are the myths of the Aztecs who, in their stories, formulated an entire structure for their universe.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It is extremely difficult to keep these different categories of myths separate from each other.

[50]
.Following Jung,[citation needed] Joseph Campbell believed that insights about one’s psychology, gained from reading myths, can be beneficially applied to one’s own life.^ Read more about the myths listed above.
  • Memory and Learning: Myths and Truths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.supermemo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Joseph Campbell & Michael J. Harner / Ritual Compared : A 5 page paper comparing and contrasting the ideas of these two theorists about the function and importance of ritual.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The elders tried to persuade her to flee for her life, but the seeress that no one believe, saw no escape for herself.

[51]
Like Jung and Campbell, Claude Lévi-Strauss believed that myths reflect patterns in the mind. .However, he saw those patterns more as fixed mental structures — specifically, pairs of oppositions (for example raw vs cooked, nature vs culture) — than as unconscious feelings or urges.^ This being is rather a culture-hero, a member of a non-natural race of men like Qat or Manabozho, than a god.

^ Those who stick to their own good rhythm often sleep less because their sleep is better structured (and thus more refreshing).
  • Memory and Learning: Myths and Truths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.supermemo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The savage's notion of personality is more a universally diffused feeling than a reasoned conception, and this feeling of a personal self he impartially distributes all over the world as known to him.

[52]
.In his appendix to Myths, Dreams and Mysteries, and in The Myth of the Eternal Return, Mircea Eliade attributed modern man’s anxieties to his rejection of myths and the sense of the sacred.^ A transition to the last type of myths explaining the origin of the human race is afforded, in some senses, by a legend from New Zealand which apparently ascribes an independent origin to man.
  • Oceanic Mythology: Part I. Polynesia: Chapter I. Myths of Origins and the Deluge 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.sacred-texts.com [Source type: Original source]

Mythopoeia is a term coined by J. R. R. Tolkien for the conscious attempt to create fiction styled like myths.
.In the 1950s, Roland Barthes published a series of essays examining modern myths and the process of their creation in his book Mythologies.^ My first collection of mythology was a lavishly illustrated book discussing the Deities and myths of Ancient Greece.
  • Myth - CLOSED - Financial District - San Francisco, CA 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.yelp.com [Source type: General]

^ This 6 page paper examines the comic book genre to determine if contemporary comic books are representative of modern mythology or are merely pure escapism.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Compares the Indian creation myth "'Rig-Veda X, cxxix: 'In the Beginning'" with Genesis, Chaper I. Excellent for those studying mythology, religion, philosophy, Western Civ.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Comparative mythology

Old Belgian banknote, depicting Ceres, Neptune and caduceus.
.Comparative mythology is the systematic comparison of myths from different cultures.^ In 1872, John Fiske wrote a "somewhat rambling and unsystematic series of papers" entitled Myths and Mythmakers: Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology .
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Trickster Myths : In 6 pages, the writer discusses examples of Trickster myths from two different cultures and demonstrates their distinguishing factors, as well as what they each have in common.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ S A Rudy has pages on vampires, shapeshifters, and witches which list the different quallities that they have when portrayed in contempory fiction in her Comparison of Myths in Popular Fiction page.
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[2] .It seeks to discover underlying themes that are common to the myths of multiple cultures.^ Trickster Myths : In 6 pages, the writer discusses examples of Trickster myths from two different cultures and demonstrates their distinguishing factors, as well as what they each have in common.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Periodic death and rebirth is a common theme in agricultural myths where the return of the deities from the earth mirrors a return to life of plants.
  • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[2] .In some cases, comparative mythologists use the similarities between different mythologies to argue that those mythologies have a common source.^ Although similar, those men were not carbon copies of each other, for they did have different characters.
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Some had powers over similar arenas as Zeus, others were quite different.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Similarities and Contrasts Between Classical and Sumerian Mythology : A 10 page orientation to ancient mythology and a comparison of Sumarian and Classic Mythology.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

This common source may be a common source of inspiration (e.g. a certain natural phenomenon that inspired similar myths in different cultures) or a common "protomythology" that diverged into the various mythologies we see today.[2]
.Nineteenth-century interpretations of myth were often highly comparative, seeking a common origin for all myths.^ In 1872, John Fiske wrote a "somewhat rambling and unsystematic series of papers" entitled Myths and Mythmakers: Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology .
  • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This page does not claim the Mozilla Foundation/Corporation is the originator of all of these Myths.
  • Firefox Myths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: General]

^ (Use the Freeware Browser Guide to compare browsers) All Myths relate to running the default install of Firefox in Windows with no Extensions.
  • Firefox Myths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: General]

[53] .However, modern-day scholars tend to be more suspicious of comparative approaches, avoiding overly general or universal statements about mythology.^ Jocasta's death, however, was more sudden and rash when compared with the suicide of Phaedra who had accumulated such tendencies throughout the progression of her story.
  • Term Papers and more term papers on Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.termpapers-on-file.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

^ However, some modern scholars dispute this meaning, because Pallas could also mean "brandisher".

[54] .One exception to this modern trend is Joseph Campbell's book The Hero With a Thousand Faces, which claims that all hero myths follow the same underlying pattern.^ This page does not claim the Mozilla Foundation/Corporation is the originator of all of these Myths.
  • Firefox Myths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: General]

^ In fact, all the dates in FoR are followed by "(Military Calendar)", which makes one wonder how this differs from the non-Military one.
  • Halo Story Page | Ancillary | Marathon Connections 31 January 2010 12:21 UTC halostory.bungie.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Myths presented here are not always worded exactly the same way and not all sites allow search engines to crawl them.
  • Firefox Myths 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: General]

.This theory of a "monomyth" is out of favor with the mainstream study of mythology.^ I have not studied this theory closely but as far as I am concerned, if it came out of IIT, I presume it is valid until proven otherwise.
  • The Seven Myths of Energy Independence | Mother Jones 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC motherjones.com [Source type: Original source]

[54]

See also

General
Archetypal literary criticism, Artificial mythology, Comparative mythology, Creation myth, Deluge myth, Folklore, Legendary creature, LGBT themes in mythology, Geomythology, Monomyth, Mytheme, Mythical place, Mythography, National myth
Mythological archetypes
Culture hero, Death deity, Earth Mother, First man or woman, Hero, Life-death-rebirth deity, Lunar deity, Messiah, Psychopomp, Sky father, Solar deity, Trickster, Underworld
Myth and religion
Religion and mythology, Magic and mythology, Hindu mythology, Christian mythology (Jesus Christ in comparative mythology), Jewish mythology, Islamic mythology
Lists
List of mythologies, List of deities, List of mythical objects, List of species in folklore and mythology, List of species in folklore and mythology by type, List of women warriors in folklore

Notes

  1. ^ Kirk, p. 8; "myth", Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ a b c d Littleton, p. 32
  3. ^ Armstrong, p. 7
  4. ^ a b Eliade, Myth and Reality, p. 1
  5. ^ a b c Dundes, Introduction, p. 1
  6. ^ a b Dundes, "Binary", p. 45
  7. ^ a b c Dundes, "Madness", p. 147
  8. ^ Doty, p. 11-12
  9. ^ Segal, p. 5
  10. ^ Kirk, "Defining", p. 57; Kirk, Myth, p. 74; Simpson, p. 3
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Bascom, p. 9
  12. ^ a b c "myths", A Dictionary of English Folklore
  13. ^ O'Flaherty, p.19: "I think it can be well argued as a matter of principle that, just as 'biography is about chaps', so mythology is about gods."
  14. ^ a b Eliade, Myths, Dreams and Mysteries, p. 23
  15. ^ Pettazzoni, p. 102
  16. ^ Eliade, Myth and Reality, p. 10-11; Pettazzoni, p. 99-101
  17. ^ a b Eliade, Myth and Reality, p. 6
  18. ^ Bascom, p. 7
  19. ^ a b Bascom, p. 10
  20. ^ Kirk, Myth, p. 22, 32; Kirk, "Defining", p. 55
  21. ^ Bascom, p. 17
  22. ^ Bascom, p. 13
  23. ^ a b Doty, p. 114
  24. ^ a b c Bulfinch, p. 194
  25. ^ a b c d e f Honko, p. 45
  26. ^ "Euhemerism", The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions
  27. ^ Segal, p. 20
  28. ^ Bulfinch, p. 195
  29. ^ Frankfort, p. 4
  30. ^ Frankfort, p. 15
  31. ^ Segal, p. 61
  32. ^ Graf, p. 40
  33. ^ Meletinsky pp.19-20
  34. ^ Segal, p. 63
  35. ^ a b Frazer, p. 711
  36. ^ Eliade, Myth and Reality, p. 8
  37. ^ a b c Honko, p. 51
  38. ^ Eliade, Myth and Reality, pp. 6-7
  39. ^ Honko, p. 47
  40. ^ Eliade, Myth and Reality, p. 19
  41. ^ Honko, p. 49
  42. ^ Guy Lanoue, Foreword to Meletinsky, p.viii
  43. ^ a b Segal, p. 1
  44. ^ Segal, pp. 3-4
  45. ^ Segal, p. 4
  46. ^ Mâche (1992). Music, Myth and Nature, or The Dolphins of Arion. pp. 8. 
  47. ^ Segal, p.20
  48. ^ Segal, p.67-68
  49. ^ a b Segal, p. 3
  50. ^ Boeree
  51. ^ For example, Campbell claimed that mythology's primary function is "that of eliciting and supporting a sense of awe before the mystery of being" (Campbell, p. 519), and that mythology also serves "to initiate the individual into the order of realities of his own psyche" (Campbell, p. 521).
  52. ^ Segal, p. 113
  53. ^ Leonard
  54. ^ a b Northup, p. 8

References

  • Armstrong, Karen. "A Short History of Myth". Knopf Canada, 2006.
  • Bascom, William. ."The Forms of Folklore: Prose Narratives". 'Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth.^ The content of Mark is a collection of myths and legends put together to form a continuous narrative.
    • The Myth of the Historical Veracity of Jesus 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC mama.indstate.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Narrative Forms Of Myth : An 8 page paper discussing the narrative style of myths in different cultures.
    • Essays on Greek Mythology ! Roman Mythology ! All Mythology ! Essays ! 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.12000papers.com [Source type: Original source]

    Ed. Alan Dundes. .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. 5-29.
  • Bulfinch, Thomas.^ Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest , University of California Press, 1953.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Classics, University of California, Berkeley and the University of California, Berkeley .
    • Ancient Greek Mythology 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC greekmyth.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ University of California Press, Berkeley, 1954.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    Bulfinch's Mythology. Whitefish: Kessinger, 2004.
  • Doty, William. Myth: A Handbook. Westport: Greenwood, 2004.
  • Dundes, Alan. "Binary Opposition in Myth: The Propp/Levi-Strauss Debate in Retrospect". Western Folklore 56 (Winter, 1997): 39-50.
  • Dundes, Alan. Introduction. Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth. Ed. Alan Dundes. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. 1-3.
  • Dunes, Alan. "Madness in Method Plus a Plea for Projective Inversion in Myth". Myth and Method. Ed. Laurie Patton and Wendy Doniger. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1996.
  • Eliade, Mircea. Myth and Reality. Trans. Willard R. Trask. .New York: Harper & Row, 1963.
  • Eliade, Mircea.^ Hooke, S. H. Middle Eastern Mythology , Penguin Books, New York, 1963.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Book of the Hopi , Penguin Books, New York, 1963.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ African Myths and Tales , Dell Publishing, New York, 1963.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    Myths, Dreams and Mysteries. Trans. Philip Mairet. .New York: Harper & Row, 1967.
  • "Euhemerism". The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions.^ Oceanic Mythology , Hamlyn, London and New York, 1967.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, Myths of Enki, the Crafty God , Oxford University Press, New York,1989.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Ed. John Bowker. .Oxford University Press, 2000. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Myths From Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sykes, Edgerton, Who's Who in Non-Classical Mythology , Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    UC - Berkeley Library. 20 March 2009 .
  • Frankfort, Henri, et al. .The Intellectual Adventure of Ancient Man: An Essay on Speculative Thought in the Ancient Near East.^ Richard McLaughlin's Mythology Notes present descriptions of gods, summaries of myths, and some historical material on the mythologies of the Ancient Near East, Persia, Scandinavia, and the Celts.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The new theories of mythology are based on the belief that " it is man, it is human thought and human language combined, which naturally and necessarily produced the strange conglomerate of ancient fable."'

    ^ (Broken Link 2/11/02) Pagans Online's Scrolls Catalogue - Ancient Near East collects some essays and translations of Mesopotamian and Egyptian texts.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Chicago:University of Chicago Press, 1977.
  • Frazer, James.^ The Gilgamesh Epic and Old Testament Parallels , University of Chicago Press, 1949.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Pritchard, James B., Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament, with Suppliment , Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1969.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah The Sumerians The University of Chicago Press, Chicago,1963.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    The Golden Bough. New York: Macmillan, 1922.
  • Graf, Fritz. Greek Mythology. Trans. Thomas Marier. .Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
  • Honko, Lauri.^ University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London, 1910, 1993.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, Myths of Enki, the Crafty God , Oxford University Press, New York,1989.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Sykes, Edgerton, Who's Who in Non-Classical Mythology , Oxford University Press, New York, 1993.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    "The Problem of Defining Myth". Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth. Ed. Alan Dundes. .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. 41-52.
  • Kirk, G.S. Myth: Its Meaning and Functions in Ancient and Other Cultures.^ The University of Victoria presents Classical Myth: The Ancient Sources , which collects links to classical images and texts and organizes them by Olympian deity.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Pritchard, James B., Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament, with Suppliment , Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1969.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Black, Jeremy and Green, Anthony, Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia: An Illustrated Dictionary , University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Berkeley: Cambridge University Press, 1973.
  • Kirk, G.S. "On Defining Myths". Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth.^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yaqui Myths and Legends , University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 1959.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, Myths of Enki, the Crafty God , Oxford University Press, New York,1989.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Ed. Alan Dundes. .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. 53-61.
  • Leonard, Scott.^ University of California Press, Berkeley, 1954.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mahabharata , University of California Press, Berkeley, 1973.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest , University of California Press, 1953.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ."The History of Mythology: Part I". Scott A. Leonard's Home Page.^ U. Mass has a page on Snake Mythology , written by Scott Jackson and Peter Mirick with illustrations by Nancy Haver.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Professor Ruth Webb, also at Princeton, has a comprehensive site on the characters in Greek mythology for her Classics Course CLA 212 Mythology Home Page .
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ (Broken Link 2/14/02) The Viking Home Page which has some info on the history and religion of the Northmen.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    August 2007.Youngstown State University, 17 November 2009
  • Littleton, Covington. .The New Comparative Mythology: An Anthropological Assessment of the Theories of Georges Dumezil.^ The hymns may be read in Sir George Grey's Polynesian Mythology, and in Taylor's New Zealand.

    ^ The new theories of mythology are based on the belief that " it is man, it is human thought and human language combined, which naturally and necessarily produced the strange conglomerate of ancient fable."'

    .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1973.
  • Meletinsky, Elea.^ Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest , University of California Press, 1953.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Vitaliano, Dorothy B. Legends of the Earth , Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1973.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ University of California Press, Berkeley, 1954.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    The Poetics of Myth. Trans. Guy Lanoue and Alexandre Sadetsky. .New York: Routledge, 2000.
  • "myth."^ African Myths and Tales , Dell Publishing, New York, 1963.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ American Indian Myths and Legends , Pantheon Books, New York.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online, 21 March 2009
  • "myths". A Dictionary of English Folklore. Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud. .Oxford University Press, 2000. Oxford Reference Online.^ Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, Myths of Enki, the Crafty God , Oxford University Press, New York,1989.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Myths From Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Oxford University Press.^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah, and Maier, John, Myths of Enki, the Crafty God , Oxford University Press, New York,1989.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Myths From Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    UC - Berkeley Library. 20 March 2009 Oxfordreference.com
  • Northup, Lesley. ."Myth-Placed Priorities: Religion and the Study of Myth". Religious Studies Review 32.1(2006): 5-10.
  • O'Flaherty, Wendy.^ The missionary is sometimes anxious to prove that religion can only come by revelation, and that certain tribes, having received no revelation, have no religion or religious myths at all.

    ^ They can be (and are) studied as myth, or as philosophical, religious, linguistic/literary or ethical text.
    • Vedic Mythology - talk.origins | Google Groups 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ (Broken Link 2/10/2002) Snaith Primary School in East Yorkshire, UK has collected a few Myth retellings from places including Japan and Mexico.
    • Myths and Legends - frames 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Hindu Myths: A Sourcebook. London: Penguin, 1975.
  • Pettazzoni, Raffaele. "The Truth of Myth". Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth. Ed. Alan Dundes. .Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984. 98-109.
  • Segal, Robert.^ University of California Press, Berkeley, 1954.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Mahabharata , University of California Press, Berkeley, 1973.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest , University of California Press, 1953.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    Myth: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2004.
  • Simpson, Michael. Introduction. Apollodorus. Gods and Heroes of the Greeks. Trans. Michael Simpson. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1976. 1-9.

Further reading

  • Stefan Arvidsson, Aryan Idols. .Indo-European Mythology as Ideology and Science, University of Chicago Press, 2006. ISBN0-226-02860-7
  • Roland Barthes, Mythologies (1957)
  • Kees W. Bolle, The Freedom of Man in Myth.^ The Gilgamesh Epic and Old Testament Parallels , University of Chicago Press, 1949.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kramer, Samuel Noah The Sumerians The University of Chicago Press, Chicago,1963.
    • Sumerian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dalley, Stephanie Myths from Mesopotamia , Oxford University Press, New York, 1991.
    • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Vanderbilt University Press, 1968.
  • Richard Buxton.^ Pima Indian Legends , University of Arizona Press, Tuscon, 1968.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    The Complete World of Greek Mythology. London: Thames & Hudson, 2004.
  • E. Csapo, Theories of Mythology (2005)
  • Edith Hamilton, Mythology (1998)
  • Graves, Robert. "Introduction." .New Larousse Encyclopedia of Mythology.^ New Larousse Encyclopedia of Mythology , Hamlyn, London.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    Trans. Richard Aldington and Delano Ames. London: Hamlyn, 1968. v-viii.
  • Joseph Campbell
    • The Hero with a Thousand Faces. .Princeton University Press, 1949.
    • Flight of the Wild Gander: Explorations in the Mythological Dimension: Select Essays 1944-1968 New World Library, 3rd ed.^ Pawnee Hero Stories and Folk-Tales , University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1961; reprinted from Forest and Stream Publishing Company, New York, 1889.
      • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Did anyone see the news on England saying how sorry they were for it's hospitals having 3rd world health care.
      • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ "Did anyone see the news on England saying how sorry they were for it's hospitals having 3rd world health care.
      • The American Spectator : The Myth of the 46 Million 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC spectator.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      (2002), ISBN 978-1-57731-210-9.
  • Mircea Eliade
    • Cosmos and History: The Myth of the Eternal Return. .Princeton University Press, 1954.
    • The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.^ Hooke, S. H., Babylonian and Assyrian Religion , University of Oklahoma Press, Norman Oklahoma, 1963.
      • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Pritchard, James B., Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament, with Suppliment , Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1969.
      • The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC home.comcast.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ University of California Press, Berkeley, 1954.
      • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

      Trans. Willard R. Trask. .NY: Harper & Row, 1961.
  • Louis Herbert Gray [ed.], The Mythology of All Races, in 12 vols., 1916.
  • Lucien Lévy-Bruhl
    • Mental Functions in Primitive Societies (1910)
    • Primitive Mentality (1922)
    • The Soul of the Primitive (1928)
    • The Supernatural and the Nature of the Primitive Mind (1931)
    • Primitive Mythology (1935)
    • The Mystic Experience and Primitive Symbolism (1938)
  • Charles H. Long, Alpha: The Myths of Creation.^ Finno-Ugric, Siberian , in MacCulloch, C. J. A., ed., The Mythology of All Races, v.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Mythology of All Races , Marshall Jones Co., Boston, 1916-1920.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The science of mythology has to account, if it can, not only for the existence of certain stories in the legends of certain races, but also for the presence of stories practically the same among almost all races.

    George Braziller, 1963.
  • O'Flaherty, Wendy. Hindu Myths: A Sourcebook. London: Penguin, 1975.
  • Barry B. Powell, Classical Myth, 5th edition, Prentice-Hall.
  • Santillana and Von Dechend (1969, 1992 re-issue). .Hamlet's Mill: An Essay Investigating the Origins of Human Knowledge And Its Transmission Through Myth, Harvard University Press.^ The question of the origin of the marks and characteristics of various animals and plants has also produced a class of myths in which the marks are said to survive from some memorable adventure, or the plants and animals to be metamorphosed human beings.

    ^ If we examine myths of human descent from animals, we find gods busy there, and if we try to investigate the myths of the origin of the gods, the subject gets mixed up with the mythical origins of things in general.

    ^ The adventure is one of the myths of the origin of death, which are almost universally diffused.

    ISBN 0-87923-215-3.
  • Walker, Steven F. and Segal, Robert A., Jung and the Jungians on Myth: An Introduction, Theorists of Myth, Routledge (1996), ISBN 978-0-8153-2259-7.
  • Zong, In-Sob. .Folk Tales from Korea.^ Folk Tales from Korea , Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd., London, 1952.
    • Flood Stories from Around the World 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.talkorigins.org [Source type: Original source]

    3rd ed. Elizabeth: Hollym, 1989.

External links


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
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From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wikibooks

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection


This Wikibook is all about Mythology. .As with Greek Mythology, when a section obtains enough content for it to be considered material for a book, it will be distended into a separate book that will only be linked to from here.^ Sections: Gods & Goddesses, Myths, Roman vs. Greek (equivalents), Mythology in the Roman Home, Quiz, Tic Tac Toe(link broken), and Links.
  • WEB SITES ON GREEK MYTHOLOGY 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.cumbavac.org [Source type: General]

^ The only exception here would be if I had one site of my company name that linked to all 500, and all 500 linked back to it.
  • Myth busting: virtual hosts vs. dedicated IP addresses 2 February 2010 16:24 UTC www.mattcutts.com [Source type: General]

^ GREEK MYTHOLOGY LINKS NEW! http://www.suelebeau.com/greek.htm A brief page of links to Greek Mythology sites.
  • WEB SITES ON GREEK MYTHOLOGY 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.cumbavac.org [Source type: General]

.Please only separate the subject of a culture's mythology into a separate book if it has a reasonable amount of content.^ Students will also gain insight into Greek culture through the exploration of Greek mythology."
  • WEB SITES ON GREEK MYTHOLOGY 10 January 2010 3:29 UTC www.cumbavac.org [Source type: General]

Mythology by nation or region


Simple English

Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:
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Mythology is the collection of myths for a culture. A myth is a story or series of stories used to explain the world around you and describe what is happening, such as why weather happens. Myths usually have heroes, gods, and creatures that are bigger or more fantastic than real life.

Other pages

krc:Мифологияrue:Міфолоґія



Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 15, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Mythology, which are similar to those in the above article.








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