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FAA radiotelephony phonetic alphabet and Morse code chart.
.The NATO phonetic alphabet, more formally the international radiotelephony spelling alphabet, is the most widely used spelling alphabet.^ So goes the NATO phonetic alphabet .

^ It uses material from the Wikipedia article "NATO phonetic alphabet".
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

.Though often called "phonetic alphabets", spelling alphabets have no connection to phonetic transcription systems like the International Phonetic Alphabet.^ Though the NATO phonetic alphabet is called the phonetic alphabet, it has nothing to do with the phonetic transcription system like the International Phonetic Alphabet.
  • Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.buzzle.com [Source type: Original source]

^ International radio or spelling alphabet .

^ Though often called "phonetic alphabets", spelling alphabets have no connection to phonetic transcription systems like the International Phonetic Alphabet.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Download the Special Interest Video: Phonetic Alphabet -3g VIDEO version-Learn 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC store.payloadz.com [Source type: General]
  • Let's Talk Walkie Talkies! 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

.Instead, the NATO alphabet assigns code words to the letters of the English alphabet acrophonically (Alfa for A, Bravo for B, etc.^ Alphabet told in words, starting with the letters.
  • Urban Dictionary: Army alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.urbandictionary.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the NATO phonetic alphabet, which word represents the letter ‘F’?

^ In order to avoid confusion, standard words are assigned to each letter of the alphabet.
  • Flight Simulator Guide :: Resources :: Aviation terms 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.flightsimulatorguide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

) so that critical combinations of letters .(and numbers) can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially when the safety of navigation or persons is essential.^ NATO Phonetic Alphabet NATO phonetic alphabet is a common name for the international radiotelephony spelling alphabet which assigns code words to the letters of the English alphabet so that critical combinations of letters (and numbers) can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially when the safety of navigation or persons is essential.
  • Tele-Communication (Telecom) Terms Glossary and Dictionary - N | NetworkDictionary 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.networkdictionary.com [Source type: Reference]

^ The NATO alphabet assigns code words to the letters of the English alphabet acrophonically so that critical combinations of letters (and numbers) can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially .

^ The NATO phonetic alphabet is a common name for the international radiotelephony spelling alphabet which assigns code words to the letters of the English alphabet so that critical combinations of letters (and numbers) can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially when the safety of navigation or persons is essential.
  • A6.AlphaZulu v1.0 freeware for Windows Mobile Pocket PC. 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.freewarepocketpc.net [Source type: General]
  • A6.AlphaZulu 1.0 freeware for Windows Mobile Pocket PC. 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.freewarepocketpc.net [Source type: General]

.The paramount reason is to ensure intelligibility of voice signals over radio links.^ The paramount reason is to ensure intelligibility of voice signals over radio links.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]
  • SeaCadets: Chatham Marine Cadets 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC units.ms-sc.org [Source type: Academic]
  • Let's Talk Walkie Talkies! 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

^ The essential reason for using code words (not really phonetic) in lieu of single letters is due to intelligibility of speech over radio links.
  • MPECS Inc. Blog: Business Principles: Working with Serial Numbers on the Phone 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC blog.mpecsinc.ca [Source type: General]

^ Phonetic alphabets are used on voice radio communications to ensure that important data is conveyed accurately.
  • Military phonetic alphabets: opportunities for recruit training 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC milism.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Contents

International

Adoption

.After the alphabet was developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) (see history below) it was adopted by many other international and national organizations, including the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the American Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the American Radio Relay League (ARRL).^ IPA from ICAO (see below ) .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ International radio or spelling alphabet .

^ Geography What is NATO The North Atlantic Treaty Organization ( NATO ) is a military alliance made up ...
  • NATO | ChaCha Answers 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.chacha.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is a subset of the much older International Code of Signals (INTERCO), which originally included visual signals by flags or flashing light, sound signals by whistle, siren, foghorn, or bell, as well as one, two, or three letter codes for many phrases.^ One, Two, Three etc.

^ It is derived from the International Code of Signals (INTERCO) an older system that used audio signals such as bells, whistles and horns as well as visual like lights or flags.

^ It is a subset of the much older International Code of Signals (INTERCO), which originally included visual signals by flags or flashing light, sound signals by whistle, siren, foghorn, or bell, as well as one, two, or three letter codes for many phrases.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • Tele-Communication (Telecom) Terms Glossary and Dictionary - N | NetworkDictionary 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.networkdictionary.com [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

[1] .The same alphabetic code words are used by all agencies, but each agency chooses one of two different sets of numeric code words.^ The same alphabetic code words are used by all agencies, but each agency chooses one of two different sets of numeric code words.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • Tele-Communication (Telecom) Terms Glossary and Dictionary - N | NetworkDictionary 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.networkdictionary.com [Source type: Reference]

^ Two sets of numeric codes exist.

^ One of two or more words that have the same or nearly the same meanings.

.NATO uses the regular English numeric words (Zero, One, with some alternative pronunciations), whereas the IMO provides for compound numeric words (Nadazero, Unaone, Bissotwo...^ NATO uses the regular English numeric words (Zero, One, with some alternative pronunciations), whereas the IMO provides for compound numeric words (Nadazero, Unaone, Bissotwo...
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The second set uses compound numeric terms Unaone, Bissotwo, Errathree etc.

^ NATO uses the normal English numeric words (Zero, One, with some alternative pronunciations), whereas the IMO uses compound numeric words (Nadazero, Unaone).
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Tele-Communication (Telecom) Terms Glossary and Dictionary - N | NetworkDictionary 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.networkdictionary.com [Source type: Reference]

). .In practice these are very rarely used, as they frequently lead to more confusion between speakers of different languages.^ In practice these are very rarely used, as they frequently lead to more confusion between speakers of different languages.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ This practice helps to prevent confusion between similar sounding letters, such as "m" and "n", and to clarify communications that may be garbled during transmission.

^ IPA has widespread use among opera singers for preparation, especially among English-speaking singers who rarely sing in their native language.
  • tb » International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.timboucher.com [Source type: General]

NATO

.The alphabet's common name (NATO phonetic alphabet) arose because it appears in Allied Tactical Publication ATP-1, Volume II: Allied Maritime Signal and Maneuvering Book used by all allied navies in NATO, which adopted a modified form of the International Code of Signals.^ It uses material from the Wikipedia article "NATO phonetic alphabet".
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ Study: NATO Phonetic Alphabet 3260.
  • http://mega4i.com/list2.php 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC mega4i.com [Source type: General]

.Because the latter allows messages to be spelled via flags or Morse code, it naturally called the code words used to spell out messages by voice its "phonetic alphabet". The name NATO phonetic alphabet became widespread because the signals used to facilitate the naval communications and tactics of NATO have become global.^ So goes the NATO phonetic alphabet .

^ It uses material from the Wikipedia article "NATO phonetic alphabet".
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Because the latter allows messages to be spelled via flags or Morse code, it naturally called the code words used to spell out messages by voice its "phonetic alphabet".
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

[2] .However, ATP-1 is marked NATO Confidential (or the lower NATO Restricted) so it is not publicly available.^ However, ATP-1 is marked NATO Confidential (or the lower NATO Restricted) so it is not publicly available.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

^ However, ATP-1 is marked NATO Confidential (or the lower NATO Restricted ) so it is not publicly available.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Nevertheless, a NATO unclassified version of the document is provided to foreign, even hostile, militaries, even though they are not allowed to make it publicly available.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

.Nevertheless, a NATO unclassified version of the document is provided to foreign, even hostile, militaries, even though they are not allowed to make it publicly available.^ A PDF version of the document is also available.

^ Nevertheless, a NATO unclassified version of the document is provided to foreign, even hostile, militaries, even though they are not allowed to make it publicly available.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ However, ATP-1 is marked NATO Confidential (or the lower NATO Restricted) so it is not publicly available.
  • http://getglue.com/topics/p/nato_phonetic_alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC getglue.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The phonetic alphabet is now also defined in other unclassified international military documents.^ It replaced other phonetic alphabets, for example the US military "able baker" alphabet.

^ NATO : The NATO phonetic alphabet (used by most international and military agencies).
  • Depressed Press of Boston: DP_AlphaWords Library 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.depressedpress.com [Source type: Reference]
  • Depressed Press of Boston: DP_AlphaWords CFML Custom Tag 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.depressedpress.com [Source type: Reference]

^ Here are phonetic alphabets for other languages .
  • Emily Davidow » Phonetic Alphabets: S as in Summertime 15 September 2009 23:14 UTC www.emilydavidow.com [Source type: General]

[3]

Language

.Most of the words are recognizable by native English speakers because English must be used upon request for communication between an aircraft and a control tower whenever two nations are involved, regardless of their native languages.^ What is the most commonly used word in the English language (written and spoken)?
  • Languages 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC dpquiz.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ What are the two most commonly used words in English?
  • Languages 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC dpquiz.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Why were they using English to communicate?
  • E2K09 - Oddities 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.cvni.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.But it is only required internationally, not domestically, thus if both parties to a radio conversation are from the same country, then another phonetic alphabet of that nation's choice may be used.^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ So using the phonetic alphabet reduces ambiguity.
  • Questions about Phonetic Alphabet - Ask.com 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.ask.com [Source type: General]

^ The Phonetic Alphabet is used by radio operators, to spell out words.
  • Let's Talk Walkie Talkies! 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

[4]
.In most versions of the alphabet, the non-English spellings Alfa and Juliett are found.^ In most versions of the alphabet, the non-English spellings Alfa and Juliett are found.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Alfa is spelled with an f as it is in most European languages.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ ITU version: Alfa Juliett X-ray .
  • Phonetic alphabets, wordlists, texts, word frequency 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.bckelk.ukfsn.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Alfa is spelled with an f as it is in most European languages.^ Alfa is spelled with an f as it is in most European languages.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

^ English grammar has minimal inflection compared with very most other Indo-European languages.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

^ In most versions of the alphabet, the non-English spellings Alfa and Juliett are found.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

.The English and French spelling alpha would not be properly pronounced by speakers of some other languages whose native speakers may not know that ph should be pronounced as f.^ The English and French spelling alpha would not be properly pronounced by speakers of other languagesnative speakers of those languages would not know that ph should be pronounced as f.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

^ Texts at Athena (English, French and other).
  • Phonetic alphabets, wordlists, texts, word frequency 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.bckelk.ukfsn.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Some other languages have pronunciation schemes, too.
  • The IPA Translation Widget: a wonderful impossibility : Notes from a Linguistic Mystic 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC linguisticmystic.com [Source type: Original source]

.Juliett is spelled with a tt for native French speakers because they may otherwise treat a single final t as silent.^ Juliett is spelled with a tt for the benefit of native French speakers because they will treat a single t as silent—the English word Juliet is Juliette in French, but the ICAO did not adopt the final e because it might be misunderstood by native Spanish speakers as indicative of a final syllable teh .
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Words for some letters have changed several times, because they could be confused with another word or they contained vowel sounds which non-native English speakers found difficult to pronounce.

^ You may notice differences in todays code from WW2 movies because some words were difficult for non-english speakers to pick up.
  • What type of alphabet does the alpha, bravo, charlie, delta.... belong? - Yahoo! Answers 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC answers.yahoo.com [Source type: General]

.In English versions of the alphabet, like that from ANSI or the version used by the British armed forces and emergency services, one or both may revert to their standard English spelling.^ British businesses use English too much .

^ Which of the British armed forces is known as the Senior Service?
  • Quizballs 74 - Free questions and answers for pub quizzes, trivia quizzes, learning and fun. 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.businessballs.com [Source type: General]

^ In English versions of the alphabet, like that from ANSI, one or both may revert to their standard English spelling.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet for Radio Communications | Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.comm-spec.com [Source type: General]

[5]

Alphabet and pronunciation

.This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.^ Other pseudo-IPA capitals supported by unicode are .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Bear this in mind if you see error symbols such as "蚟" in articles.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To see which version you are using type ⎕SE.SALT.Version UTC is sometimes denoted as Z time – Zero-offset zone time – or Zulu time from the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • Vector, Volume 24, N°1 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.vector.org.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The pronunciation of the words in the alphabet as well as numbers may vary according to the language habits of the speakers.^ Alphabet and pronunciation The pronunciation of the words in the alphabet as well as numbers may vary according to the language habits of the speakers.
  • yawiki.org entry for NATO phonetic alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: Reference]

^ The NATO alphabet assigns code words to the letters of the English alphabet acrophonically so that critical combinations of letters (and numbers) can be pronounced and understood by those who transmit and receive voice messages by radio or telephone regardless of their native language, especially .

^ The correct term for it is the "international radiotelephony spelling alphabet," sometimes referred to as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or NATO phonetic alphabet, and it includes numbers as well as letters.
  • USATODAY.com - 'We've got clearance, Clarence' 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.usatoday.com [Source type: News]

In order to eliminate wide variations in pronunciation, posters illustrating the pronunciation desired are available from the ICAO.

Letters

Letter Code word Pronunciation IPA from ICAO (see below)
A Alfa (ICAO, ITU, IMO, FAA)
Alpha (ANSI)
AL FAH ˈælfɑ
B Bravo BRAH VOH ˈbrɑːˈvo
C Charlie CHAR LEE  or
SHAR LEE
ˈtʃɑːli  or
ˈʃɑːli
D Delta DEL TAH ˈdeltɑ
E Echo ECK OH ˈeko
F Foxtrot FOKS TROT ˈfɔkstrɔt
G Golf GOLF ɡʌlf [sic]
H Hotel HO TELL (ICAO)
HOH TELL (ITU, IMO, FAA)
hoːˈtel
I India IN DEE AH ˈindiˑɑ
J Juliett (ICAO, ITU, IMO, FAA)
Juliet (ANSI)
JEW LEE ETT ˈdʒuːliˑˈet
K Kilo KEY LOH ˈkiːlo
L Lima LEE MAH ˈliːmɑ
M Mike MIKE mɑik
N November NO VEM BER noˈvembə
O Oscar OSS CAH ˈɔskɑ
P Papa PAH PAH pəˈpɑ
Q Quebec KEH BECK keˈbek
R Romeo ROW ME OH ˈroːmiˑo
S Sierra SEE AIR RAH (ICAO, ITU, IMO)
SEE AIR AH (FAA)
siˈerɑ
T Tango TANG GO ˈtænɡo [sic]
U Uniform YOU NEE FORM  or
OO NEE FORM
ˈjuːnifɔːm  or
ˈuːnifɔrm [sic]
V Victor VIK TAH ˈviktɑ
W Whiskey WISS KEY ˈwiski
X X-ray or
Xray
ECKS RAY (ICAO, ITU)
ECKS RAY (IMO, FAA)
ˈeksˈrei
Y Yankee YANG KEY ˈjænki [sic]
Z Zulu ZOO LOO ˈzuːluː

Digits

Digit Code word Pronunciation
0 Zero (FAA)
Nadazero (ITU, IMO)
ZE RO (ICAO, FAA)
NAH-DAH-ZAY-ROH (ITU, IMO)
1 One (FAA)
Unaone (ITU, IMO)
WUN (ICAO, FAA)
OO-NAH-WUN (ITU, IMO)
2 Two (FAA)
Bissotwo (ITU, IMO)
TOO (ICAO, FAA)
BEES-SOH-TOO (ITU, IMO)
3 Three (FAA)
Terrathree (ITU, IMO)
TREE (ICAO, FAA)
TAY-RAH-TREE (ITU, IMO)
4 Four (FAA)
Kartefour (ITU, IMO)
FOW ER (ICAO, FAA)
KAR-TAY-FOWER (ITU, IMO)
5 Five (FAA)
Pantafive (ITU, IMO)
FIFE (ICAO, FAA)
PAN-TAH-FIVE (ITU, IMO)
6 Six (FAA)
Soxisix (ITU, IMO)
SIX (ICAO, FAA)
SOK-SEE-SIX (ITU, IMO)
7 Seven (FAA)
Setteseven (ITU, IMO)
SEV EN (ICAO, FAA)
SAY-TAY-SEVEN (ITU, IMO)
8 Eight (FAA)
Oktoeight (ITU, IMO)
AIT (ICAO, FAA)
OK-TOH-AIT (ITU, IMO)
9 Nine (FAA)
Novenine (ITU, IMO)
(No 'r' in spellings)
NIN ER (ICAO, FAA)
NO-VAY-NINER (ITU, IMO)

Pronunciation

.The spelling and pronunciation given are those officially prescribed by the ICAO, ITU, IMO, and the FAA. The ICAO indicates unstressed numeric syllables in lower case (stressed in UPPER CASE), unlike its own alphabet, where stressed syllables are UNDERLINED UPPER CASE (unstressed in UPPER CASE).^ The spelling and pronunciation given is that officially prescribed by the ICAO, ITU, IMO, and the FAA. The ICAO indicates unstressed numeric syllables in lower case (stressed in UPPER CASE), unlike its own alphabet, where stressed syllables are UNDERLINED UPPER CASE (unstressed in UPPER CASE).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Wherever the agencies (ICAO, ITU, IMO, FAA, ANSI) differ, each agency's preferred pronunciations or spellings are also given in the table.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ A European accented male voices a spoke in English [Note: UPPER case letters pronounced using the NATO phonetic alphabet].
  • E2K09 - Oddities 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.cvni.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In the interests of uniformity, the IMO/FAA style of stressed syllables in BOLD will be used here (underlines might be confused with links).^ In the interests of uniformity, the IMO/FAA style of stressed syllables in BOLD will be used here (underlines might be confused with links).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Here is a link that might be useful: Harrison's H4 .
  • OT: A Wrinkle in Time for the U.S. 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.glyphs.com [Source type: General]

^ Here is a link that might be useful: Internal Revenue Service News .
  • OT: A Wrinkle in Time for the U.S. 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.glyphs.com [Source type: General]

.Wherever the agencies (ICAO, ITU, IMO, FAA, ANSI) differ, each agency's preferred pronunciations or spellings are also given in the table.^ Wherever the agencies (ICAO, ITU, IMO, FAA, ANSI) differ, each agency's preferred pronunciations or spellings are also given in the table.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The FAA gives different spellings for their pronunciations depending on the publication consulted.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The final version given in the table above was implemented by the ICAO on 1 March 1956, [ 9 ] and was adopted before 1959 by the ITU, because it appears in the 1959 Radio Regulations as an established phonetic alphabet.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The ICAO, ITU, and IMO give an alternate pronunciation for a couple of letter-words.^ X-RAY SNOWBALL QUESTION Give two words that have two consecutive letter ‘a’s’ in them?

^ Below is each letter, its word, the pronunciation, and the IPA spelling.

^ What 6-letter word denotes a second wing fitted in an aircraft forward of the main wings to give extra stability?
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

.The FAA gives the alternate pronunciations in one publication as shown by the image on this page, but in other publications it does not.^ PAGE 49 ANAGRAMMATICAL QUIZ 78 Unravel the anagrams and cryptic clues to give the titles of 15 number one hits .

^ If one party has a cached shared secret and the other party does not, this indicates one of two possible situations.
  • draft-zimmermann-avt-zrtp-13 - ZRTP: Media Path Key Agreement for Secure RTP 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tools.ietf.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Federation: Gives a way the other one like this I think.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

.The FAA gives different spellings for their pronunciations depending on the publication consulted.^ The FAA gives different spellings for their pronunciations depending on the publication consulted.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The FAA gives the alternate pronunciations in one publication as shown by the image on this page, but in other publications it does not.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The pronunciations indicated are broad transcriptions because many different pronunciations of each code word are allowed in actual use, depending on the language habits of the speakers.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.These are from the FAA Flight Services manual (§ 14.1.5) and the ATC manual (§ 2-4-16).^ These are from the FAA Flight Services manual (§ 14.1.5) and the ATC manual (§ 2-4-16).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.ANSI gives English spellings, but does not give pronunciations or numbers.^ ANSI gives English spellings, but does not give pronunciations or numbers.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The FAA gives the alternate pronunciations in one publication as shown by the image on this page, but in other publications it does not.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ In English versions of the alphabet, like that from ANSI or the version used by the British armed forces and emergency services, one or both may revert to their standard English spelling.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The ICAO, NATO, and FAA use the common English number words (with stress), which are also the second component of the more complex ITU and IMO number words (no stress), but not always pronounced the same.^ Number of words in English .
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

^ The ICAO, NATO, and FAA use the common English number words (with stress), which are also the second component of the more complex ITU and IMO number words (no stress), but not always pronounced the same.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ English is not required domestically, thus if both parties to a radio conversation are from the same country, then another phonetic alphabet of that nation's choice may be used.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

[4][6][7][5][8]
.Only the ICAO prescribes any kind of IPA pronunciation (and then only for letters, not numbers).^ Your email address: Your username: Letters and numbers only.
  • Joss Whedon's Dollhouse 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Below is each letter, its word, the pronunciation, and the IPA spelling.

[4] .Several of the pronunciations indicated do not occur in current General American English or British Received Pronunciation (ˈʃɑːli, ɡʌlf, ˈroːmiˑo, ˈuːnifɔrm) or are simplified representations of these (ˈtænɡo, ˈjænki).^ The IPA form of Golf implies it is pronounced gulf , which does occur, but not in either General American English or British Received Pronunciation.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Several of the pronunciations indicated do not occur in current General American English or British Received Pronunciation ( ˈʃɑːli , ɡʌlf , ˈroːmiˑo , ˈuːnifɔrm ) or are simplified representations of these ( ˈtænɡo , ˈjænki ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Furthermore, the pronunciation prescribed for "whiskey" agrees with many (but by no means all) English dialects, in which the "wh-" is simplified into the non- fricative "w-" sound.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The pronunciations indicated are broad transcriptions because many different pronunciations of each code word are allowed in actual use, depending on the language habits of the speakers.^ The pronunciations indicated are broad transcriptions because many different pronunciations of each code word are allowed in actual use, depending on the language habits of the speakers.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ All of the words are recognisable by native English speakers because English must be used upon request for communication between an aircraft and a control tower whenever two nations are involved, regardless of their native languages.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A8245910 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Most of the words are recognizable by native English speakers because English must be used upon request for communication between an aircraft and a control tower whenever two nations are involved, especially when they have different languages.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Thus only a generic 'e' is indicated, rather than its various shades; 'r' indicates an English r, rather than a trilled r; 'i' indicates either a long or short i.^ Thus only a generic 'e' is indicated, rather than its various shades; 'r' indicates an English r, rather than a trilled r; 'i' indicates either a long or short i.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The use of hash commitment in the DH exchange ( Section 5.4.1.1 ) constrains the attacker to only one guess to generate the correct SAS in his attack, which means the SAS can be quite short.
  • draft-zimmermann-avt-zrtp-08 - ZRTP: Media Path Key Agreement for Secure RTP 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tools.ietf.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Either way, it was around as a generic gesture of respect a long time before the Nazis — and at least a few decades before the founding of the United States, for that matter.
  • Newer Than They Think - Television Tropes & Idioms 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Both the IPA and Latin alphabet pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before 1956 with input from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom,[9] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents.^ Military alphabets before 1956 .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ English is not an official language in either United States or United Kingdom.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

^ Both the IPA and Latin alphabet pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before 1956 with input from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom , [ 9 ] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The Latin alphabet version usually has a rhotic accent ('r' always pronounced), as in CHAR LEE, SHAR LEE, NO VEM BER, YOU NEE FORM, and OO NEE FORM, whereas the IPA version usually has a non-rhotic accent ('r' pronounced only before a vowel), as in ˈtʃɑːli, ˈʃɑːli, noˈvembə, and ˈjuːnifɔːm.^ The Latin alphabet and IPA forms of Bravo have different syllable stresses.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The Latin alphabet version usually has a rhotic accent ('r' always pronounced), as in CHAR LEE , SHAR LEE , NO VEM BER , YOU NEE FORM , and OO NEE FORM , whereas the IPA version usually has a non-rhotic accent ('r' pronounced only before a vowel), as in ˈtʃɑːli , ˈʃɑːli , noˈvembə , and ˈjuːnifɔːm .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Both the IPA and Latin alphabet pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before 1956 with input from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom , [ 9 ] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Exceptions are OSS CAH and ˈuːnifɔrm.^ Exceptions are OSS CAH and ˈuːnifɔrm .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The IPA form of Golf implies it is pronounced gulf, which does occur, but not in either General American English or British Received Pronunciation.^ BBC (or Queen's) English, and it may be noticeable by its preference for "Received Pronunciation"; it typifies Cambridge English Language Teaching Accreditation, which is standard for teaching of English to speakers of other languages in Europe, Africa, Indian subcontinent, and other areas influenced either by British Commonwealth or by a desire not to be identified with United States.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

^ The development of the IPA dates back to 1886 , when a group of French and British language teachers formed the International Phonetic Association .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These should not be confused with true sign languages like British Sign Language and American Sign Language used in Anglophone countries, which are independent and not based on English.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

.The Latin alphabet and IPA forms of Bravo have different syllable stresses.^ The Latin alphabet and IPA forms of Bravo have different syllable stresses.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ In Unicode, some of the symbols of Greek origin have Latin forms for use in IPA; the others use the symbols from the Greek section.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The sound value of Semitic Taw, Greek alphabet Tαυ (Tau), and Old Italic alphabet and Latin T was IPA /t/.

The ŋ phoneme ('ng') in the IPA forms of Tango and Yankee is shown as an 'n' and marked [sic]. .The midheight back rounded vowel shown in Oscar and Foxtrot is actually a low back rounded vowel in Received British, and a low unrounded vowel in General American.^ Several of the pronunciations indicated do not occur in current General American English or British Received Pronunciation ( ˈʃɑːli , ɡʌlf , ˈroːmiˑo , ˈuːnifɔrm ) or are simplified representations of these ( ˈtænɡo , ˈjænki ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Both the IPA and Latin alphabet pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before 1956 with input from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom , [ 9 ] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The IPA form of Golf implies it is pronounced gulf , which does occur, but not in either General American English or British Received Pronunciation.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Furthermore, the pronunciation prescribed for "whiskey" agrees with many (but by no means all) English dialects, in which the "wh-" is simplified into the non-fricative "w-" sound.^ In other dialects, like Indian English, all voiceless stops remain unaspirated.
  • English Language - Home - oo.vg 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC english-language.oo.vg [Source type: Original source]

^ In other dialects, as Elean and Cretan, the symbol was apparently used for sounds resembling the English voiced and unvoiced th (ð, þ).

^ The there were many options for action at a given time, and all of them were easily accessible with no prior scripting.
  • It's been done better in... - Unknown Worlds Forums 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.natural-selection.org [Source type: General]

History

.The first internationally recognized alphabet was adopted by the ITU in 1927. The experience gained with that alphabet resulted in several changes being made in 1932 by the ITU. The resulting alphabet was adopted by the International Commission for Air Navigation, the predecessor of the ICAO, and was used in civil aviation until World War II.^ It uses material from the "International Phonetic Alphabet" .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In an alphabetical list, what are the first three states of the USA? 6 What were the first three full length animated features made by the Disney film studios?

^ Who were these two victims of the First World War?
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

[9] It continued to be used by the IMO until 1965:
Amsterdam Baltimore Casablanca Denmark Edison Florida Gallipoli Havana Italia Jerusalem Kilogramme Liverpool Madagascar New_York Oslo Paris Quebec Roma Santiago Tripoli Upsala Valencia Washington Xanthippe Yokohama Zurich
Military alphabets before 1956
United Kingdom United States
Royal Navy Western Front slang
or "signalese"
RAF phonetic alphabet U.S. phonetic
alphabet
1914–1918 (WWI) 1924–1942 1943–1956 1941–1956
Apples
Butter
Charlie
Duff
Edward
Freddy
George
Harry
Ink
Johnnie
King
London
Monkey
Nuts
Orange
Pudding
Queenie
Robert
Sugar
Tommy
Uncle
Vinegar
Willie
Xerxes
Yellow
Zebra
Ack
Beer
Charlie
Don
Edward
Freddie
Gee
Harry
Ink
Johnnie
King
London
Emma
Nuts
Oranges
Pip
Queen
Robert
Esses
Toc
Uncle
Vic
William
X-ray
Yorker
Zebra
Ace
Beer
Charlie
Don
Edward
Freddie
George
Harry
Ink
Johnnie
King
London
Monkey
Nuts
Orange
Pip
Queen
Robert
Sugar
Toc
Uncle
Vic
William
X-ray
Yorker
Zebra
Able/Affirm
Baker
Charlie
Dog
Easy
Fox
George
How
Item/Interrogatory
Jig/Johnny
King
Love
Mike
Nab/Negat
Oboe
Peter/Prep
Queen
Roger
Sugar
Tare
Uncle
Victor
William
X-ray
Yoke
Zebra
Able
Baker
Charlie
Dog
Easy
Fox
George
How
Item
Jig
King
Love
Mike
Nan
Oboe
Peter
Queen
Roger
Sugar
Tare
Uncle
Victor
William
X-ray
Yoke
Zebra
.In military use British and American armed forces each developed their phonetic alphabets prior to both forces adopting the NATO alphabet in 1956. British forces adopted the RAF phonetic alphabet which is similar to the phonetic alphabet used by the Royal Navy in World War I.^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ Study: NATO Phonetic Alphabet 3260.
  • http://mega4i.com/list2.php 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC mega4i.com [Source type: General]

^ British forces adopted the RAF phonetic alphabet which is similar to the phonetic alphabet used by the Royal Navy in World War I .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.The U.S. adopted the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet from 1941 to standardize systems amongst all branches of its armed forces.^ And the name of the system is the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • FARK.com: (4260853) What has the Fox network got against its own sci-fi shows? And are Fringe, Dollhouse and the sublime Sarah Connor Chronicles doomed, simply because of bad scheduling? 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.fark.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The U.S. adopted the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet from 1941 to standardize systems amongst all branches of its armed forces.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The NATO phonetic alphabet (the one that begins "alpha, bravo" ) was standardized in 1956.
  • Newer Than They Think - Television Tropes & Idioms 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The U.S. alphabet became known as Able Baker after the words for A and B. The United Kingdom adapted its RAF alphabet in 1943 to be almost identical to the American Joint-Army-Navy (JAN) one.^ Since the NATO phonetic alphabet and amateur radio word for Z is "Zulu", UTC is sometimes known as Zulu time.
  • NBC Action Weather Blog : Snow Data...Storm A Brewin'...UPDATE 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC community.nbcactionnews.com [Source type: General]

^ During World War II, the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet has been developed for use in joint Allied operations.

^ A curious fact is that many classical composers wrote two works of the same type, but only one of them became known and famous, and the other one was nearly forgotten.
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

.After World War II, with many aircraft and ground personnel drawn from the allied armed forces, "Able Baker" continued to be used in civil aviation.^ After World War II, with many aircraft and ground personnel drawn from the allied armed forces, "Able Baker" continued to be used in civil aviation.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The experience gained with that alphabet resulted in several changes being made in 1932 by the ITU. The resulting alphabet was adopted by the International Commission for Air Navigation, the predecessor of the ICAO , and was used in civil aviation until World War II .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ During World War II, the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet has been developed for use in joint Allied operations.

.But many sounds were unique to English, so an alternative "Ana Brazil" alphabet was used in Latin America.^ But many sounds were unique to English, so an alternative "Ana Brazil" alphabet was used in Latin America .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ A European accented male voices a spoke in English [Note: UPPER case letters pronounced using the NATO phonetic alphabet].
  • E2K09 - Oddities 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.cvni.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Furthermore, the pronunciation prescribed for "whiskey" agrees with many (but by no means all) English dialects, in which the "wh-" is simplified into the non- fricative "w-" sound.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.But the International Air Transport Association (IATA), recognizing the need for a single universal alphabet, presented a draft alphabet to the ICAO in 1947 which had sounds common to English, French, and Spanish.^ But the International Air Transport Association (IATA), recognizing the need for a single universal alphabet, presented a draft alphabet to the ICAO in 1947 which had sounds common to English, French, and Spanish.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The experience gained with that alphabet resulted in several changes being made in 1932 by the ITU. The resulting alphabet was adopted by the International Commission for Air Navigation, the predecessor of the ICAO , and was used in civil aviation until World War II .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ International Phonetic Alphabet for English explains those IPA symbols used to represent the phonemes of English.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

After further study and modification by each approving body, the revised alphabet was implemented on 1 November 1951 in civil aviation, (but it may not have been adopted by any military):[9]
Alfa Bravo Coca Delta Echo Foxtrot Golf Hotel India Juliett Kilo Lima Metro Nectar Oscar Papa Quebec Romeo Sierra Tango Union Victor Whisky Extra Yankee Zulu
.Immediately, problems were found with this list.^ Immediately, problems were found with this list.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Some users felt that they were so severe that they reverted to the old "Able Baker" alphabet.^ Some users felt that they were so severe that they reverted to the old "Able Baker" alphabet.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.To identify the deficiencies of the new alphabet, testing was conducted among speakers from 31 nations, principally by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States.^ To identify the deficiencies of the new alphabet, testing was conducted among speakers from 31 nations, principally by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ United Kingdom News 6179.
  • http://mega4i.com/list2.php 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC mega4i.com [Source type: General]

^ The U.S. alphabet became known as Able Baker after the words for A and B. The United Kingdom adapted its RAF alphabet in 1943 to be almost identical to the American Joint-Army-Navy (JAN) one.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Confusion among words like Delta, Nectar, Victor, and Extra, or the unintelligibility of other words under poor receiving conditions were the main problems.^ Confusion among words like Delta, Nectar, Victor, and Extra, or the unintelligibility of other words under poor receiving conditions were the main problems.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Hardy and Hearty - Glossary of Usage - Commonly Confused Words The adjective "hardy" means daring, courageous, and capable of surviving difficult conditions.
  • Grammar & Composition Sitemap - Page 4 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC spiderbites.about.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ What 6-letter word denotes a second wing fitted in an aircraft forward of the main wings to give extra stability?
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

.After much study, only the five words representing the letters C, M, N, U, and X were replaced.^ After much study, only the five words representing the letters C, M, N, U, and X were replaced.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Which is the only sport that represents a letter in the NATO phonetic alphabet?

^ What five-letter word is the name given to a positive electrode?

.The final version given in the table above was implemented by the ICAO on 1 March 1956,[9] and was adopted before 1959 by the ITU, because it appears in the 1959 Radio Regulations as an established phonetic alphabet.^ The final version given in the table above was implemented by the ICAO on 1 March 1956, [ 9 ] and was adopted before 1959 by the ITU, because it appears in the 1959 Radio Regulations as an established phonetic alphabet.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Military alphabets before 1956 .
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The NATO phonetic alphabet (the one that begins "alpha, bravo" ) was standardized in 1956.
  • Newer Than They Think - Television Tropes & Idioms 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[10] .Because the ITU governs all international radio communications, it was also adopted by all radio operators, whether military, civilian, or amateur (ARRL).^ Because the ITU governs all international radio communications, it was also adopted by all radio operators, whether military, civilian, or amateur ( ARRL ).
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ The final version given in the table above was implemented by the ICAO on 1 March 1956, [ 9 ] and was adopted before 1959 by the ITU, because it appears in the 1959 Radio Regulations as an established phonetic alphabet.
  • Boston University School of Theology Archives 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC sthweb.bu.edu [Source type: Reference]

^ Our operations are all deniable missions, disavowed by the government; sitting at a kitchen table making bombs is a good enough reason to die.
  • Writing.Com: SISCO Chapters 1, 2, 3 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.writing.com [Source type: General]

.It was finally adopted by the IMO in 1965. In 1947 the ITU adopted the compound number words (Nadazero Unaone, etc.^ Also included are additional dictionaries which cover compound and non-English words resulting in a combined advantage of reducing the number of errors by 30%, on average, over the previous version.
  • The Kleper Report on Digital Publishing - Issue 5.1 January / February 2000 15 September 2009 23:14 UTC www.printerport.com [Source type: General]

), later adopted by the IMO in 1965.

Usage

.The alphabet is used to spell out parts of a message containing letters and numbers to avoid confusion, because many letters sound similar, for instance "n" and "m" or "b" and "d"; the potential for confusion increases if static or other interference is present.^ It's easy to confuse words that are similar in sound, spelling, or meaning.
  • Grammar & Composition Sitemap - Page 4 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC spiderbites.about.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Using the same alphabet, how would you spell the word MOUSE? MIKE, OSCAR, UNIFORM, SIERRA, ECHO 26.

^ This presents operational difficulties for the attacker in many VoIP usage scenarios, because being in the media path for every call is often harder than being in the signaling path.
  • The Zfone Project - FAQ 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC zfoneproject.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.For instance the message "proceed to map grid DH98" could be transmitted as "proceed to map grid Delta-Hotel-Niner-Ait". Using "Delta" instead of "D" avoids confusion between "BH98" and "DH98". The unusual pronunciation of certain numbers was designed to reduce confusion, eg, "Niner" instead of "Nine", to avoid confusion with "Five", in the presence of static.^ Or the friend who clarified the often confusing abbreviations used by various Japanese telcos, so we could tell dynamic from static and fiber from DSL. .
  • enemieslist.com: spamNEWS: gripes Archive 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC enemieslist.com [Source type: General]

^ Nigel’s thought was I could create a new domain: instead of blog , maybe I could use wordpress .
  • Jack Yan: the Persuader Blog: December 2009 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.jackyan.com [Source type: General]

^ Note use of the letter " Z " on the flight deck instead of her hull number ("38").

[citation needed]
.In addition to the traditional military usage, civilian industry uses the alphabet to combat similar problems in the transmission of messages over telephone systems.^ Military Alphabet The Hodori Military has its own, and since 2008 is starting to also use the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Used by combat arms soldiers to describe anyone in a support Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) .
  • Military Slang Expressions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.spywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I've worked with people in all branches of the military, alphabet soup federal agencies, police departments, and civilians.
  • Hysteria, Inc. 15 September 2009 23:14 UTC www.devvy.com [Source type: Original source]

.For example, it is often used in the retail industry where customer or site details are spoken over the telephone (in order to authorize a credit agreement or confirming stock codes), although ad hoc coding is often used in that instance.^ These systems are often used in electronic media, although their usage has been declining with the development of computer technology, specifically because of spreading support for Unicode .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ You need to enable javascript in order to use Simple CAPTCHA. Security Code: .
  • Feast Your Eyes On These 5 New Resources | How To Make Money 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.dtalpha.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The first group (which is often only one digit) is the group code, which groups countries where books are published by the language spoken there.
  • "We are more afraid of excellence than of failure." -Marianne Williamson, A Return To Love: Reflections on the Principles of A Course in Miracles 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC theboard.byu.edu [Source type: General]

.It has found heavy usage in the information technology industry to accurately and quickly communicate serial/reference codes (which are frequently very long) or other specialised information by voice.^ Started by holotone 3 years ago I find myself in a line of work where where I need to communicate long strings of letters over the telephone very precisely....
  • The Big Lebowski Phonetic Alphabet -- A Grupthink Topic 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.grupthink.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The VBR codec is leaking information about the content of the voice packets, because some sounds compress more than other sounds.
  • The Zfone Project - FAQ 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC zfoneproject.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Office Org and Procedure' 1952 British Army 'Signal Training Pam 7, Voice Procedure' US or Other Language Manuals or References.

.In addition, most major airlines use the alphabet to communicate passenger name records (PNRs) internally, and in some cases, with customers.^ In its most basic of definitions, identification is where one thing is the same as another - in this case, a name refers to an object, so the name may be used in place of the object - they are the same thing for the purposes of the particular context.
  • enemieslist.com: spamNEWS: gripes Archive 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC enemieslist.com [Source type: General]

^ In some cases, the Unicode names and the IPA names do not agree.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The following table shows some of the most commonly used commands in Speech Recognition.
  • Common commands in Speech Recognition 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC windows.microsoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Several letter codes and abbreviations using the phonetic alphabet have become well-known, such as Bravo Zulu (letter code BZ) for "well done",[11] Checkpoint Charlie (Checkpoint C) in Berlin, and Zulu Time for Greenwich Mean Time or Coordinated Universal Time.^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ It is an abbreviation of Victor Charlie, which was the NATO phonetic alphabet abbreviation for Viet Cong.
  • Episode 813: Jack Frost / the Distributed MST3K Annotation Project 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.dapcentral.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Zulu in phonetic alphabet, stands for UT, Universal Time.

.During the Vietnam War, Viet Cong guerrillas and the group itself were referred to as VC, or Victor Charlie; the name "Charlie" became synonymous with this force.^ It is an abbreviation of Victor Charlie, which was the NATO phonetic alphabet abbreviation for Viet Cong.
  • Episode 813: Jack Frost / the Distributed MST3K Annotation Project 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.dapcentral.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Coined during Vietnam War.
  • Military Slang Expressions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.spywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Victor Charlie (US) The Viet-Cong, from the NATO phonetic alphabet for "VC", used during the Vietnam War' often shortened to Charlie (see above).
  • Military Slang Expressions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.spywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Variants

Aviation

.
  • "Delta" is replaced by "Data", "Dixie" or "David" at airports that have a majority of Delta Air Lines flights, such as Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in order to avoid confusion because "Delta" is also Delta's callsign.^ Real-time flight arrival and departure data for an airport, either as a board inside or near the airport terminal or a virtual version on a website or teletext.
    • airodyssey.net - Reference (Glossary) 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.airodyssey.net [Source type: Reference]

    ^ Everything else outside the major cities, ports, airports, roadways, rail lines, and oil refineries still looks like it would if Hodori never modernized.
    • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Alternate: Airport indicated on a flight plan where it is possible to divert the aircraft from its scheduled destination (in case of bad weather or any other major situation).
    • airodyssey.net - Reference (Glossary) 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.airodyssey.net [Source type: Reference]

    [citation needed]
  • "Lima" is replaced by "London" in Indonesia because "lima" means "5" in the Indonesian language. .Thus, confusion could occur if a string of mixed numerals and letters was being given.^ The good thing about this system is that every ack in the game could be shown as a short three letter string.
    • Unknown Worlds Forums > It's been done better in... 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.natural-selection.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    [citation needed]

Other

.Many unofficial phonetic alphabets are in use that are not based on a standard, but are based on words the transmitter can easily remember.^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ What word or words in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet are monosyllabic?
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

^ U What word represents U in the NATO phonetic alphabet?

.Often, such ad-hoc phonetic alphabets are first name alphabets based on (mostly) men's names, such as Alan Bobby Charlie David Edward Frederick George Howard Isaac James Kevin Larry Michael Nicholas Oscar Peter Quincy Robert Stephen Trevor Ulysses Vincent William Xavier Yaakov Zebedee, or on a mixture of names and other easily recognizable (and locally understandable) proper nouns, such as U.S. states, local cities and towns, etc.^ And the name of the system is the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • FARK.com: (4260853) What has the Fox network got against its own sci-fi shows? And are Fringe, Dollhouse and the sublime Sarah Connor Chronicles doomed, simply because of bad scheduling? 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.fark.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It is an abbreviation of Victor Charlie, which was the NATO phonetic alphabet abbreviation for Viet Cong.
  • Episode 813: Jack Frost / the Distributed MST3K Annotation Project 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.dapcentral.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Whisky Romeo Zulu (2004) * An excellent movie based on the 1999 LAPA air accident, and it is named after the NATO phonetic alphabet version of the identifier of the accident aircraft.
  • Amazon.com: watch "foreign" films from Argentina? 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

.One documented example of this is the LAPD phonetic alphabet.^ The NATO phonetic alphabet (the one that begins "alpha, bravo" ) was standardized in 1956.
  • Newer Than They Think - Television Tropes & Idioms 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After one of their own is threatened, the Minister requests that they all be given code names, based on the NATO phonetic alphabet (Echo, Sierra, Victor, etc.
  • Jack Yan: the Persuader Blog: December 2009 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.jackyan.com [Source type: General]

^ This is different from the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), which is a method of documenting each sound in language.

[citation needed]
.In addition, "India" used to be replaced by "Indigo" in the alphabet used by British Police forces, but this is no longer the case.^ A European accented male voices a spoke in English [Note: UPPER case letters pronounced using the NATO phonetic alphabet].
  • E2K09 - Oddities 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.cvni.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Alfa Juliett X-ray, which is the ICAO version, appears in A Concise Dictionary Of Slang And Unconventional English and also a Langenscheidt dictionary] [There is one report of UK police using Indigo instead of India.

^ This blocks the flow of sensitive discourse until the user is forced to take notice that he's no longer protected by encryption.
  • draft-zimmermann-avt-zrtp-13 - ZRTP: Media Path Key Agreement for Secure RTP 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tools.ietf.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[citation needed]

Additions in other languages

.Certain languages' standard alphabets have letters, or letters with diacritics (e.g., umlauts) that do not exist in the English alphabet.^ A European accented male voices a spoke in English [Note: UPPER case letters pronounced using the NATO phonetic alphabet].
  • E2K09 - Oddities 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.cvni.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ English language schools in London - English language courses in London, colleges and universities Contact English language schools directly by email using our more than 600 emaillinks to English language school and our example letter.

^ Which five letter word is the only one in the English language that is pronounced the same even if you remove the last four letters?

.Each of these countries had its own radiotelephonic alphabet containing words for these letters decades before the ICAO had their alphabet.^ When you pressed the first letter, you got another list which contained all the acks you could actually say, and each of these also had it's own intuitive letter.
  • It's been done better in... - Unknown Worlds Forums 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.natural-selection.org [Source type: General]
  • Unknown Worlds Forums > It's been done better in... 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.natural-selection.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The origin of this word is a former phonetic alphabet in which the letter R (for "received") was for Roger, as opposed to Romeo today.
  • airodyssey.net - Reference (Glossary) 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.airodyssey.net [Source type: Reference]

^ In the NATO phonetic alphabet what three words represent the last three letters of the alphabet?

Danish

.The Danish phonetic alphabet uses Ægir for <Æ>, Ødis (village and parish in Denmark) for <Ø>, and Åse (female first name) for <Å>.^ Military Alphabet The Hodori Military has its own, and since 2008 is starting to also use the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The International Phonetic Alphabet ( IPA ) is a system of phonetic notation devised and in use by linguist s.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Well, in Dollhouse the actives are named after the NATO phonetic alphabet because they lack a true identity.
  • The Zone • View topic - Stray Film Thoughts/Questions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC zone.aintitcool.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Estonian

.In Estonian, Õnne (female first name) is used for <Õ>, Ärni (male first name) is used for <Ä>, Ööbik ("Nightingale") for <Ö> and Ülle (female first name) for <Ü>.^ Does naming the actives using the NATO phonetic alphabet imply that Alpha (or Alfa as the case may be) was the first active?
  • Movie, TV, and Book Reviews, Free Downloads, and News 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC grottogirlreviews.com [Source type: General]

^ First name Female .

Finnish

.In Finnish, Åke (male first name) is used for <Å>, Äiti ("mother") for <Ä> and Öljy ("oil") for <Ö>.^ Certs breath mints used ' with Retsin' in an advertising compaign, Retsin apparenly simply being a marketing name for vegetable oil.
  • Episode 813: Jack Frost / the Distributed MST3K Annotation Project 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.dapcentral.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Does naming the actives using the NATO phonetic alphabet imply that Alpha (or Alfa as the case may be) was the first active?
  • Movie, TV, and Book Reviews, Free Downloads, and News 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC grottogirlreviews.com [Source type: General]

German

.To the above NATO series has been added Ärger ("anger") for <Ä>, Ökonom ("economist") for <Ö>, and Übermut ("cockiness") for <Ü> as prescribed by DIN 5009 since 1996. These additions are not in the ICAO alphabet and are used only in the German-speaking world.^ Military Alphabet The Hodori Military has its own, and since 2008 is starting to also use the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Preshared mode MUST NOT be used for adding additional media streams to an existing call.
  • draft-zimmermann-avt-zrtp-08 - ZRTP: Media Path Key Agreement for Secure RTP 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC tools.ietf.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Which is the only sport that represents a letter in the NATO phonetic alphabet?

.Three other special consonants commonly used in German radiotelephonic alphabets are: Charlotte for <Ch>, Schule ("school") for <Sch> ("sh"), and Esszett for <ß>.^ May be used in a more vulgar fashion as "Tits Up" Tango Yankee (INTL) [NATO phonetic alphabet] short for "Thank You.", commonly used over the radio.
  • Military Slang Expressions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.spywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The sound-values of most consonant s taken from the Latin alphabet correspond to those of French, and are also close to those of most other European languages: such consonants include , , , , , , , , , (unvoiced) , , , .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This also applies to other pages using Help:Special characters .
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

ß can also be encoded as "ss".

Norwegian

.The Norwegian phonetic alphabet of the Norwegian Defence Forces uses Ærlig ("honest") for <Æ>, Østen ("the East") for <Ø>, and Åse (female first name) for <Å>.^ Military Alphabet The Hodori Military has its own, and since 2008 is starting to also use the NATO phonetic alphabet.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The International Phonetic Alphabet ( IPA ) is a system of phonetic notation devised and in use by linguist s.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC articles.gourt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Charlie (US) NATO phonetic alphabet for the letter C. Used during the Vietnam War as a general term for the Vietcong or the Vietnamese people.
  • Military Slang Expressions 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.spywriter.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The civil alphabet uses Ægir (a Norse god), Ørnulf (a male name) and Ågot (a female name).^ My army uses a variation of the NATO phonetic alphabet, mostly replacing the names with certain words with states.
  • NationStates • View topic - Tropes For Your Nation 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC forum.nationstates.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Does naming the actives using the NATO phonetic alphabet imply that Alpha (or Alfa as the case may be) was the first active?
  • Movie, TV, and Book Reviews, Free Downloads, and News 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC grottogirlreviews.com [Source type: General]

Spanish

In Spain, Ñoño is used for <Ñ>.
In Latin America, Ñandú ("rhea") or Ñuble is used for <Ñ>.[citation needed]

Swedish

.In Swedish, Alfa Alfa is used for <Å>, Alfa Echo for <Ä> and Oscar Echo <Ö> when using the NATO phonetic alphabet.^ You can use the Phonetic alphabet.
  • The Coolest Server Names - Server Fault 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC serverfault.com [Source type: General]

^ Study: NATO Phonetic Alphabet 3260.
  • http://mega4i.com/list2.php 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC mega4i.com [Source type: General]

^ What word or words in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet are monosyllabic?
  • Questions and Answer - FunTrivia.com : Archive 181 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.funtrivia.com [Source type: General]

[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ International Code of Signals, United States Edition, 1969 Edition (Revised 2003), Chapter 1, pages 18-19, 148.
  2. ^ Globalization and Sea Power
  3. ^ Communication instructions – General, Allied Communications Publication ACP 121(H), Combined Communications-Electronics Board, April 2007, section 318
  4. ^ a b c Aeronautical Telecommunications: Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, Volume II, Chapter 5.
  5. ^ a b American National Standard T1.523-2001, Telecom Glossary 2000
  6. ^ ITU Phonetic Alphabet and Figure Code
  7. ^ ICAO Phonetics by the FAA
  8. ^ ICAO phonetic alphabet by Canada
  9. ^ a b c d L.J. Rose, "Aviation's ABC: The development of the ICAO spelling alphabet", ICAO Bulletin 11/2 (1956) 12-14.
  10. ^ International Telecommunication Union, "Appendix 16: Phonetic Alphabet and Figure Code", Radio Regulations (Geneva, 1959) 430-431.
  11. ^ Where does the term "Bravo Zulu" originate?
  12. ^ "Sambandsregelmente för Försvarsmakten, Telefoni - HKV 12800: 70799" dated 2006-06-26.

External links

.

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Noun

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:
Plural
NATO phonetic alphabets
NATO phonetic alphabet (plural NATO phonetic alphabets)
.
  1. informal name for a spelling alphabet officially known as the ICAO radiotelephony spelling alphabet.^ The NATO phonetic alphabet is a common name for the international radiotelephony spelling.
    • Analyse horse races and predict the outcome 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.softinstitute.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Here is the NATO Phonetic Alphabet (common name for the radiotelephony spelling alphabet ).
    • SayPhonetic (dialplan applications) 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC www.asteriskguru.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ More on the Radiotelephony spelling alphabet (also known as NATO phonetic alphabet)...
    • Google Orthography | More Randomness | BoingBoing on Nigritude Ultramarine | The Google Programmer | Nigritude Ultramari ... 9 January 2010 1:01 UTC blogoscoped.com [Source type: General]

    See ICAO spelling alphabet

Simple English

The NATO phonetic alphabet is a way of using words to replace letters. Although it is called a "phonetic alphabet" because it is used so no one gets confused when saying letters, it does not have the same reasons as the International Phonetic Alphabet or other phonetic alphabets. The first letter of the word is the letter the word stands for. This is done to help make speech easier to understand at times when it is important to be understood such as in the military and in air travel. There have been many different phonetic alphabets over time. On board ships, flags are known as these letters, and each have their own meanings. Different countries also have different phonetic alphabets.

Alphabet

This is the phonetic alphabet that is used most often today:

AAlpha FFoxtrot KKilo PPapa UUniform ZZulu
BBravo GGolf LLima QQuebec VVictor
CCharlie HHotel MMike RRomeo WWhiskey
DDelta IIndia NNovember SSierra XX-ray
EEcho JJuliet OOscar TTango YYankee

Numbers are also in the phonetic alphabet. The English numbers 0 through 8 are written and spoken the same. The number 9 is written the same, but it is pronounced niner.


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 11, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on NATO phonetic alphabet, which are similar to those in the above article.








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