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The NCAA Women's Water Polo Championship has existed since the 2001 season. Three conferences have teams competing in women's water polo, the Collegiate Water Polo Association, the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation and the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Some teams compete at Division III either as members of the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference or independently.

The following conferences and institutions received automatic qualification for the 2009 Championships, which begin with first round games on May 8: Collegiate Water Polo Association, Michigan; Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, Marist; Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, USC; Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, Cal Lutheran; and Western Water Polo Association, Loyola Marymount. The following institutions received at-large bids to the championship field: Stanford, UCLA, and Hawai'i.

The UCLA Bruins women's team (3rd seeded) battled the #1 rated USC Trojans for the national championship on Sunday, May 10, 2009 at College Park, Maryland. With two goals from Tanya Gandy in the first minute of the game, UCLA won a record fifth consecutive crown, 11th national title and 7th NCAA crown.[1] Gandy earned the NCAA Tournament's most valuable player honor.

Championship winners

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Division I

The University of California-Los Angeles Bruins are honored at the White House by President of the United States George W. Bush in June 2008 for their winning the 2008 Division I national championship. The Bruins own six of the eight Division I titles ever awarded and are four-time defending champions.
Year National Champion Score Runner-Up Host or site
2001 UCLA 5-4 Stanford Stanford University, Avery Aquatic Center, Stanford, California
2002 Stanford 8-4 UCLA Southern California, McDonald's Swim Stadium, Los Angeles, California
2003 UCLA (2) 4-3 Stanford UC San Diego, Canyonview Pool, San Diego, California
2004 Southern California 10-8 Loyola Marymount Stanford University, Avery Aquatic Center, Stanford, California
2005 UCLA (3) 3-2 Stanford Michigan, Canham Natatorium , Ann Arbor, Michigan
2006 UCLA (4) 9-8 Southern California UC Davis, Schaal Aquatics Center , Davis, California
2007 UCLA (5) 5-4 Stanford Long Beach St., Joint Forces Training Base, Los Alamitos, California
2008 UCLA (6) 6-3 Southern California Stanford University, Avery Aquatic Center, Stanford, California
2009 UCLA (7) 5-4 Southern California University of Maryland, Eppley Recreation Center Natatorium, College Park, Maryland

[1][2]

Tournament notes

No school from outside the state of California has ever surpassed fourth place. Hence, no non-California school has ever participated in the NCAA Women's Water Polo Championship game, nor has a non-California school ever won the consolation game. In fact, with the exception of Stanford University in Stanford, California (in the northern part of the state), all of the schools who have achieved first, second, or third place have been located in Los Angeles, California. Prior to NCAA tournament competition, USA Water Polo conducted an intercollegiate team championship from 1984-2000. In 1995, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania became the only non-California school to win the intercollegiate women's water polo championship.

The women's water polo team from UCLA has won 7 of the nine championships, and won the 100th and 101st NCAA Championship for the school in 2007 and 2008 respectively.[3][4]

2009 National Championship games were played on May 8-10. The first round games: #1 seed USC (24-1) vs. #8 Cal Lutheran (19-12); #2 Stanford (24-3) vs. #7 Marist (18-13); #3 UCLA (22-6) vs. #6 Michigan (33-8); and #4 Hawai'i (18-8) vs. # 5 Loyola Marymount (24-7).

See also

External links

References


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