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A Nasheed (Arabic: singular نشيد , plural أناشيد; also spelt Nasyid in Malaysia and Indonesia; ilahi in Turkish, in Bosnia and Herzegovina/Albania: Ilahija) is an Islamic-oriented song. Traditionally, it is sung a cappella, accompanied only by a daff. This musical style is used because many Muslim scholars interpret Islam as prohibiting the use of musical instruments except for some basic percussion.

A new generation of "Nasheed" artists use a wide variety of musical instruments in their art. This has caused controversy amongst the Muslim community because of the vast range of scholarly opinions that exist on Music in Islam. These range from absolutely no music and singing, to that of any musical instruments allowed so long as the subject matter is of an Islamic ethos. There is also a crossover of mainstream music of groups like Outlandish, Aman, and solo artists like Dawud Wharnsby Ali, Sami Yusuf, Slave of Allah and Idris Phillips, appealing to a significant Muslim crowd and also leading to performance of such artists at Islamic orientated festivals, conferences, concerts and shows (e.g. ISNA, Celebrate Eid, Young Muslims). Other artists and organisations such as Noor Media promote a 100% instrument free stance with nasheeds, differing from the current trends of the increasing usage of instruments in nasheeds.

Inshad in Syria had a new direction since 1975 by new Monshideen who started a new way of Inshad. They turned to give more importance to the lyrics that help the Muslim cause, the most famous of them are Abo Aljuod, Abo Dujana and Abo Ratib. Recently, Nasheed came to point, it has its own fans, channels, songwriters, composers, and great voices. Inshad also began to be opened more and more to the non-inshad fans and to respond to the whole Muslim Ummah needs.

Nasheeds are also increasingly being accompanied by professionally produced videos for certain tracks. Examples include "Atfalana", "Ya Ummi" by Ahmed Bukhatir Madinah Tun-Nabi by Aashiq al-Rasul Al Mu'allim, Meditation, Hasbi Rabbi (all by Sami Yusuf), Du'a by Seven 8 Six, Mercy like the Rain by SHAAM & Our World by Zain Bhikha.

Some example of a Nasheed artists now is Raihan in Malaysia and Mishary Rashid Al-Afasy.

Nasheeds are popular in Middle East, Southeast Asia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo and South Asia. They are also popular in the UK among British Muslims.

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