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History of al-Andalus
Granada Alhambra gazelle Poterie 9019.JPG
711–1492

711–732 Invasions


756–1039 Omayyads of Córdoba


1039–1085 Taifas


1085–1145 Almoravids


1147–1238 Almohads


1238–1492 Emirate of Granada


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The Capitulation of Granada by F. Pradilla y Ortiz, 1882: Muhammad XII confronts Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.

The Nasrid dynasty or Banuu Nasri (Arabic: بنو نصر‎) was the last Arab and Muslim dynasty in Spain. The Nasrid dynasty rose to power after the defeat of the Almohad dynasty in 1212 at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa. Twenty-three different emirs ruled Granada from the founding of the dynasty in 1232 by Muhammed I ibn Nasr until January 2, 1492, when Muhammad XII surrendered to the Christian Spanish kingdoms of Aragon and Castile. Today, the most visible evidence of the Nasrids is the Alhambra palace complex built under their rule.

Contents

List of Nasrid Sultans of Granada

Genealogical chart

Family tree showing the relations between each Sultan. Daughters and are omitted, as are sons whose descendants never took the throne. During times of rival claimants, this generally recognizes the Sultan who controlled the city of Granada itself and the Alhambra.

See also

References

  • Fernández Puertas, Antonio (1997). The Alhambra. Vol 1. From the Ninth Century to Yusuf I (1354). Saqi Books. ISBN 0-86356-466-6.  
  • Fernández Puertas, Antonio. The Alhambra. Vol. 2. (1354 - 1391). Saqi Books. ISBN 0-86356-467-4.  
  • Harvey, Leonard Patrick (1992). Islamic Spain 1250 to 1500. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-31962-8.  
  • Watt, W. Montgomery (1965). A History of Islamic Spain. Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 0-7486-0847-8.  
  • Arié, Rachel (1990) (in french). L’Espagne musulmane au Temps des Nasrides (1232–1492) (2nd ed.). De Boccard. ISBN 2-7018-0052-8.  
  • Bueno, Francisco (2004) (in spanish). Los Reyes de la Alhambra. Entre la historia y la leyenda. Miguel Sánchez. ISBN 84-7169-082-9.  
  • Cortés Peña, Antonio Luis; Vincent, Bernard (1983-1987) (in spanish). Historia de Granada. 4 vols. Editorial Don Quijote.  

External links

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Simple English

[[File:|thumb|right|250px|The Capitulation of Granada by F. Pradilla y Ortiz, 1882: Muhammad XII surrenders to Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.]] The Nasrid dynasty or Banuu Nasri (Arabic: بنو نصر) was the last Arab and Muslim dynasty in Spain. The Nasrid dynasty came to power after the defeat of the Almohad dynasty in 1212 at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa. Twenty-three different emirs ruled Granada from the founding of the dynasty in 1232 by Muhammed I ibn Nasr until January 2, 1492, when Muhammad XII of Granada surrendered to the Christian Spanish kingdoms of Aragon and Castile. Today, the most visible evidence of the Nasrids is the Alhambra palace built under their rule.

Contents

List of Nasrid Sultans of Granada

  • Muhammed I ibn Nasr (1238-1272)
  • Muhammed II al-Faqih (1273-1302)
  • Muhammed III (1302-1309)
  • Nasr (1309-1314)
  • Ismail I (1314-1325)
  • Muhammed IV (1325-1333)
  • Yusuf I (1333-1354)
  • Muhammed V (1354-1359, 1362-1391)
  • Ismail II (1359-1360)
  • Muhammed VI (1360-1362)
  • Yusuf II (1391-1392)
  • Muhammed VII (1392-1408)
  • Yusuf III (1408-1417)
  • Muhammed VIII (1417-1419, 1427-1429)
  • Muhammed IX (1419-1427, 1430-1431, 1432-1445, 1448-1453)
  • Yusuf IV (1431-1432)
  • Yusuf V (1445-1446, 1462)
  • Muhammed X (1446-1448)
  • Muhammed XI (1453-1454)
  • Said (1454-1464)
  • Abu l-Hasan Ali, known as Muley Hacén (1464-1482, 1483-1485)
  • Abu 'abd Allah Muhammed XII, known as Boabdil (1482-1483, 1486-1492)
  • Abū `Abd Allāh Muhammed XIII, known as El Zagal (1485-1486)

Genealogical chart

[[Image:|670px|Family tree showing the relations between each Sultan. Daughters and are omitted, as are sons whose descendants never took the throne. During times of rival claimants, this generally recognizes the Sultan who controlled the city of Granada itself and the Alhambra.]]
Family tree showing the relations between each Sultan. Daughters and are omitted, as are sons whose descendants never took the throne. During times of rival claimants, this generally recognizes the Sultan who controlled the city of Granada itself and the Alhambra.

Other pages

References

  • William Montgomery Watt: A History of Islamic Spain, Edinburgh University Press, 1965 ISBN 0-7486-0847-8

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