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National Assembly
25th Parliament / 4th Democratic Parliament
Coat of arms or logo.
Type
Type Lower house of Parliament of South Africa
Leadership
Speaker Max Sisulu, ANC
since 6 May 2009
Deputy Speaker Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge, ANC
since 25 September 2008
Leader of Government Business Kgalema Motlanthe, ANC
since 10 May 2009
Leader of the Opposition Athol Trollip, DA
since 6 May 2009
Structure
Members 400
Seat breakdown of the National Assembly of South Africa.svg
Political groups
Election
Voting system Party-list proportional representation
Last election 22 April 2009
Meeting place
National Assembly of South Africa Copyright 2007 Kaihsu Tai.jpg
National Assembly Chamber, Houses of Parliament, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa
Website
National Assembly
South Africa

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
South Africa



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The National Assembly is the lower house of the Parliament of South Africa, located in Cape Town, Western Cape Province. It consists of no fewer than 350 and no more than 400 members. It is a elected using a party-list proportional representation system where half of the members are elected proportionally from 9 provincial lists and the remaining half from national lists so as to restore proportionality. Members serve 5 year terms.

The National Assembly is presided over by a Speaker, assisted by a Deputy Speaker. The current Speaker is Max Sisulu and the Deputy Speaker is Nomaindia Mfeketo; they were elected on 6 May 2009.[1]

Contents

Allocation

The National Assembly seats are allocated using a proportional representation system with closed lists. Seats are first allocated according to the (integer part of the) Droop quota. Thereafter at most five seats are allocated using the largest remainder method (using the Droop quota). Any additional seats are allocated amongst the parties who then already have seats using the highest averages method.

Voters have one vote at elections to the National Assembly. Seats are allocated in ten multi-member constituencies via party lists. One constituency is a national or 'at large' constituency and nine others represent each of the nine provinces. The lists were called the national lists and regional lists in the 2009 election. 'Regional' was used to avoid confusion with the provincial legislature elections held at the same time. Previously they were called 'National to National' and 'Provincial to National'. Parties decide whether they want to set up both national and provincial lists or only provincial lists. If all parties choose national lists then half of the members will come from the national 'at large' constituency and half from the nine provincial constituencies. If no party chooses a national list then all members will come from the nine provincial constituencies. In the 2009 election one party chose not to use a national list resulting in 168 members being elected from the national constituency and 232 from the nine provincial constituencies.

History

In South Africa’s second democratic election in 1999, the African National Congress (ANC) won 266 seats. They were followed by the Democratic Party (DP) with 38 seats, the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) with 34, the New National Party (NNP) with 28, and the United Democratic Movement (UDM) with 14. Other smaller parties are also represented.

After the third democratic election in 2004 the NNP was severely weakened, obtaining only 7 seats, and formally disbanded in 2005, with the majority of the party joining the ANC. The ANC obtained 279 seats, gaining a two-thirds majority and the ability to change the constitution. The DP became the Democratic Alliance (DA), and remained as the official opposition with 50 seats.

In the fourth democratic election in 2009 the ANC lost its two-thirds majority in the National Assembly, but remained the majority party with 264 seats. The DA increased its support to 67 seats, and the new Congress of the People (COPE) party, a breakaway from the ANC, obtained 30 seats. The IFP was reduced to 18 seats.

Election results

The last election was on 22 April 2009.

e • d Summary of the 22 April 2009 South African National Assembly election results
Parties Leaders Votes % Seats
Floor crossing[2] 2009
[3]
+/–
2009 +/− 2005 2007 Dissol.
African National Congress (ANC) Jacob Zuma 11,650,748 65.90 −3.79 +14 +4 297 264 −33
Democratic Alliance (DA) Helen Zille 2,945,829 16.66 +4.29 −3 ±0 47 67 +20
Congress of the People (COPE) Mosiuoa Lekota 1,311,027 7.42 +7.42 new 30 +30
Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) Mangosuthu Buthelezi 804,260 4.55 −2.42 −5 ±0 23 18 −5
Independent Democrats (ID) Patricia de Lille 162,915 0.92 −0.78 −2 −1 4 4 ±0
United Democratic Movement (UDM) Bantu Holomisa 149,680 0.85 −1.43 −3 ±0 6 4 −2
Freedom Front Plus (VF+) Pieter Mulder 146,796 0.83 −0.06 ±0 ±0 4 4 ±0
African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP) Kenneth Meshoe 142,658 0.81 −0.79 −3 ±0 4 3 −1
United Christian Democratic Party (UCDP) Lucas Mangope 66,086 0.37 −0.38 ±0 ±0 3 2 −1
Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) Motsoko Pheko 48,530 0.27 −0.46 ±0 −2 1 1 ±0
Minority Front (MF) Amichand Rajbansi 43,474 0.25 −0.10 ±0 ±0 2 1 −1
Azanian People's Organisation (AZAPO) Mosibudi Mangena 38,245 0.22 −0.03 ±0 ±0 1 1 ±0
African Peoples' Convention (APC) Themba Godi 35,867 0.20 +0.20 +2 2 1 −1
Movement Democratic Party (MDP) 29,747 0.17 +0.17 new 0 ±0
Al Jama-ah Abdul Gamiet Flacks 25,947 0.15 +0.15 new 0 ±0
Christian Democratic Alliance (CDA)* Louis Michael Green 11,638 0.07 −0.13 new 0 ±0
National Democratic Convention (NADECO) Hawu Mbatha 10,830 0.06 +0.06 +4 ±0 4 0 −4
New Vision Party (NVP) 9,296 0.05 +0.05 new 0 ±0
United Independent Front (UIF) Malizole Diko 8,872 0.05 +0.05 +2 −2 0 0 ±0
Great Kongress of SA (GKSA) 8,271 0.05 +0.05 new 0 ±0
South African Democratic Congress (SADECO) Ziba Jiyane 6,035 0.03 +0.03 new 0 ±0
Keep It Straight and Simple (KISS) C.C. Emary 5,440 0.03 −0.01 new 0 ±0
Pan Africanist Movement (PAM) 5,426 0.03 +0.03 new 0 ±0
Alliance of Free Democrats (AFD) 5,178 0.03 +0.03 new 0 ±0
Women Forward (WF) 5,087 0.03 +0.03 new 0 ±0
A Party 2,847 0.02 +0.02 new 0 ±0
New National Party (NNP) (joined ANC in 2005) Marthinus van Schalkwyk −1.65 −7 did not run 0 0
Christian Democratic Party (CDP) (see CDA) Theunis Botha −0.04 did not run 0
National Action (NA) Jacobus Frederick Jonker −0.10 did not run 0
Peace and Justice Congress (PJC) Muhammed Rashad Khan −0.10 did not run 0
Socialist Party of Azania (SOPA) Tiyani Lybon Mabasa −0.10 did not run 0
New Labour Party (NLP) (see CDA) Colin Francois du Sart −0.10 did not run 0
United Front (UF) T. D. Hlatshwayo −0.08 did not run 0
Employment Movement of South Africa (EMSA) M. Reitz −0.07 did not run 0
The Organisation Party (TOP) Bradford Wood −0.05 did not run 0
Federation of Democrats (FD)[2] +1 ±0 1 0 −1
National Alliance (NA)[2] 1 0 −1
United Party of South Africa (UPSA)[2] 1 −1 0 0 ±0
Progressive Independent Movement (PIM)[2] +1 −1 0 0 ±0
Total 17,680,729 100.0 400 400
Spoilt votes (% is of all votes cast)[4][5] 239,237 1.34 −0.25

Notes:

* The 2009 Christian Democratic Alliance (CDA) was an alliance of the 2004 Christian Democratic Party (CDP), the 2004 New Labour Party (NLP) and other parties that weren't on the 2004 national ballot.

Current composition

Party Members
African National Congress 264
Democratic Alliance 67
Congress of the People 30
Inkatha Freedom Party 18
Freedom Front Plus 4
Independent Democrats 4
United Democratic Movement 4
African Christian Democratic Party 3
United Christian Democratic Party 2
African Peoples' Convention 1
Azanian People's Organization 1
Minority Front 1
Pan Africanist Congress of Azania 1
Total 400

References

  1. ^ "Sisulu elected National Assembly speaker". Mail & Guardian Online. 6 May 2009. http://www.mg.co.za/article/2009-05-06-sisulu-elected-national-assembly-speaker. Retrieved 6 May 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "State of parties after floor-crossing as at 17 September 2007". Parliamentary Monitoring Group. http://www.pmg.org.za/parlinfo/seats. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 
  3. ^ "Official national election results". Independent Online. Reuters. 2009-04-25. http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=3086&art_id=nw20090425180808812C584100. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 
  4. ^ "South Africa: 2009 National Assembly election results". Electoral Institute of Southern Africa. April 2009. http://www.eisa.org.za/WEP/sou2009results1.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  5. ^ "South Africa: National results 2004". EISA. May 2007. http://www.eisa.org.za/WEP/souresults2004.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 

External links

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