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National Autistic Society
Founders A group of London parents
Type Registered charity
Founded 1962
Headquarters London
Area served United Kingdom
Focus Support the rights and interests of all people with Autism
Revenue £45 million (2003)
Members 230,000+
Website http://www.autism.org.uk/

The National Autistic Society (NAS) is a British charity for people with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), including autism and Asperger's Syndrome. The purpose of the organisation is primarily to improve of the lives of people with Autism in the United Kingdom.

Founded in 1962 as the Autistic Children's Aid Society of North London, it currently has around 20 000 members. The NAS is funded through voluntary contributions and charity events.

In addition to the campaigns the NAS has a number of specialist facilities to provide support, education and advocacy to autistic people and their families.

Contents

History and organization

The National Autistic Society originated from the foundation of the Autistic Children's Aid Society of North London on 23 January 1962 by parents of autistic children living in the area, with the assistance of a member from The Spastics Society (later Scope).[1] The current name was adopted in 1975 when the charity extended its interest to the whole of the United Kingdom. It has the following names registered with the Charity Commission:

  • The National Autistic Society
  • National Society for Autistic Children
  • Autism UK
  • Action for Autism

The NAS is organized into four regions and currently run by an elected Board of Trustees and an elected Council through a Strategic Management Group. The group also has a president (Jane Asher) and a patron (the Countess of Wessex). In 2008, it employed 2,903 persons and spent 77.35 million of 79.86 million in expenditures directly on its charitable activities (approx 97%).

Schools and facilities

The NAS manages a number of residential schools in the United Kingdom.

Broomhayes School

Broomhayes School and Children's Centre (alternatively Kingsley House) is a residential school near Bideford, Devon and consists mostly of buildings of a former NHS infectious diseases unit. The school was established in 1985 in Westward Ho!, before moving to its current location in 1993 and has a maximum capacity of 26 boarding students. As of March 2009 it is currently supplemented by a further education unit for 14 students, utilising a Grade II listed Rectory near Northam, Devon.

Construction work to extend and redevelop the Kingsley House site commenced on January 2009. The project will consolidate all facilities currently provided by Broomhayes School into a single site, easing transportation issues affecting some severely disabled students. The new buildings are expected to be built to the specifications and needs of both boarding and day students, whilst most of the former hospital units will be refurbished. Upon completion in Autumn 2009, the Rectory may be sold off.[2]

  • Daldorch House School, a residential school in Scotland.

Helen Allison School

The Helen Allison School is a residential school for 42 day pupils and 28 residential pupils, and is located near Meopham, Kent. The school was originally founded at Gravesend in 1968, before moving to its present location in 1991.

Radlett Lodge School

The Radlett Lodge School is a residential school for 49 pupils (including 14 residential) in Rotherham, South Yorkshire. It was opened in 1974, with boarding facilities being added in 1986.

Sybil Elgar School

The Sybil Elgar School is a residential school in Southall, West London. It was opened in 1965.

Branding and identity

The NAS has had different styles of branding during it history to reflect changes in their name and role. In the 1990s the main colour scheme was green and its logo was based on the shape of a jigsaw piece.

The logo and colour scheme was overhauled in 2002, which involved tones of blue and jade. in 2008 the primary colour scheme was adjusted to shades of violet.

Sources

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