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Diagram of Near Threatened in relation to other IUCN categories.

Near Threatened (NT) is a conservation status assigned to species or lower taxa that may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status. As such the IUCN notes the importance of re-evaluating Near Threatened taxa often or at appropriate intervals.

The rationale used for Near Threatened taxa usually includes the criteria of Vulnerable which are plausible or nearly met, such as reduction in numbers or range. Near Threatened species evaluated from 2001 onwards may also be ones which are dependent on conservation efforts to prevent their becoming threatened, whereas prior to this Conservation Dependent species were given a separate category.

There are 3703 taxa which have been evaluated and are considered Near Threatened by the IUCN. These include 2423 animal species, and 1050 plant species.

Additionally the 402 Conservation Dependent taxa may also be considered Near Threatened.

Examples of near threatened species include the leafy sea dragon, Kererū, Salamanderfish, Krüper's Nuthatch, California Red-legged Frog, Silvery Woolly Monkey, Arrojadoa dinae, Chamaesyce olowaluana, Cycas brunnea, Dayak Fruit Bat.

IUCN Categories and Criteria version 2.3

Diagram of Lower Risk/near threatened in the older IUCN version 2.3, beside the former Lower Risk/conservation dependent subcategory.
The near threatened Small-clawed Otter. The European Otter is also near threatened.
The Maned Wolf is near threatened largely from habitat loss, especially due to conversion to agricultural land.

Prior to 2001 the IUCN used the version 2.3 Categories and Criteria, which included a separate category for Conservation Dependent species (LR/cd). With this category system Near Threatened and Conservation Dependent were both subcategories of the category "Lower Risk". Taxa which were last evaluated prior to 2001 may retain their LR/cd or LR/nt status, although had the category been assigned with the same information today the species would be designated simply "Near Threatened (NT)" in either case.

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Near Threatened (NT) is a conservation status assigned to species or lower taxa that may be considered threatened with extinction in the near future, although it does not currently qualify for the threatened status. As such the IUCN notes the importance of re-evaluating Near Threatened taxa often or at appropriate intervals.

The rationale used for Near Threatened taxa usually includes the criteria of Vulnerable which are plausible or nearly met, such as reduction in numbers or range. Near Threatened species evaluated from 2001 onwards may also be ones which are dependent on conservation efforts to prevent their becoming threatened, whereas prior to this Conservation Dependent species were given a separate category.

Additionally the 402 Conservation Dependent taxa may also be considered Near Threatened.

IUCN Categories and Criteria version 2.3

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is near threatened largely from habitat loss, especially due to conversion to agricultural land.]]

Prior to 2001 the IUCN used the version 2.3 Categories and Criteria, which included a separate category for Conservation Dependent species (LR/cd). With this category system Near Threatened and Conservation Dependent were both subcategories of the category "Lower Risk". Taxa which were last evaluated prior to 2001 may retain their LR/cd or LR/nt status, although had the category been assigned with the same information today the species would be designated simply "Near Threatened (NT)" in either case.

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