Necropolis: Wikis

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  • the tomb of Son Ferrer on the island of Majorca served as a necropolis where the remains of over a hundred people, including infants, have been found?
  • Jaina Island, a Maya necropolis, contains over 20,000 burials, with every one excavated having one or more ceramic figurines (example pictured)?

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Encyclopedia

(Redirected to List of necropoleis article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

View of the Tyre Necropolis in Lebanon.
View of the Etruscan necropolis of Banditaccia in Cerveteri, Italy.
Athlete tomb in the necropolis in Taranto, Italy.
Nepasa necropolis in Algeria.
Roknia necropolis in Algeria.
Necropolis de San Carlos Borromeo in Cuba, August 2007.
Chaukundi necropolis near Karachi, Pakistan.
Part interior of the Chellah necropolis in Rabat, Morocco.

A necropolis (Greek plural: necropoleis; Latin plural: necropoles) is a large cemetery or burial ground, usually including structural tombs. The word comes from the Greek νεκρόπολις - nekropolis, meaning "city of the dead". Apart from the occasional application of the word to modern cemeteries outside large towns, the term is chiefly used of burial grounds, near the centers of ancient civilizations, such as an abandoned city or town.

Grave field is a term for prehistoric burial grounds that do not include any above-ground structures or markers. These include row graves, urnfields, tumuli, etc.

Contents

List of examples

Algeria

Austria

Australia

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Canada

China

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Denmark

Egypt

France

Germany

Indonesia

Israel

Italy

Lebanon

Republic of Macedonia

Malaysia

Malta

Mexico

Morocco

Pakistan

The famous archeological site in Pakistan is tilted "Moen Jo Daro", which literary means "Mound of the dead"

Peru

Poland

Philippines

Russia

Serbia

  • Karaburma,
  • Krajčinovići, Bronze age
  • Bukovac, Illyrian graveyards[4]
  • Golubac, Illyrian graveyards
  • Jagodin-Mala, 4th century Christian necropolis
  • Cezava, medieval
  • Mokrin, Copper Age
  • Pesaca, medieval
  • Boljetin, medieval
  • Ravna, medieval
  • Ribnica, medieval
  • Porecka Reka, medieval
  • Hajducka Vodenica, prehistoric and medieval necropolis
  • Pirivoj, Roman necropolis

Slovenia

  • Neviodunum, Roman
  • Šempeter v Savinjski dolini, Roman

Turkey

United Kingdom

United States

Uzbekistan

Vatican City

See also

References & notes

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

NECROPOLIS, a cemetery or burying-place, literally a "city of the dead" (Gr. ve cp6S, corpse, and rats, city). Apart from the occasional application of the word to modern cemeteries outside large towns, the term is chiefly used of burialgrounds near the sites of the centres of ancient civilizations.


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