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Ned Kelly

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Gregor Jordan
Produced by Lynda House
Nelson Woss
Written by Robert Drewe (novel)
John Michael McDonagh
Starring Heath Ledger
Orlando Bloom
Naomi Watts
Geoffrey Rush
Music by Klaus Badelt
Cinematography Oliver Stapleton
Editing by Jon Gregory
Studio StudioCanal
Working Title Films
Distributed by Focus Features (USA)
Universal Pictures(UK)
UIP
Release date(s) 27 March 2003
Running time 120 minutes
Country Australia
Language English

Ned Kelly is an Australian film directed by Gregor Jordan. The film portrays the life of Ned Kelly — a legendary bushranger in northeast Victoria. Ned Kelly, his brother Dan, and two other men — Steve Hart and Joe Byrne — formed a gang of Irish Australians in response to Irish and English tensions that arose in 19th century Australia. The film is mainly based on Robert Drewe's book Our Sunshine.[1] Heath Ledger plays the title role as Edward 'Ned' Kelly.

Contents

Plot

The film starts out with a young Ned Kelly rescuing a young boy from drowning. The film then pans to the Australian bush with Ned talking about his father. He then awakes in the Australian outback, and sees a white mare. He rides it into town, only to be arrested, and subsequently imprisoned in 1871, for supposedly stealing the horse (even though it had actually been stolen by Wild Wright, Ned's friend).

Three years later Ned is released, and comes home to a warm welcome from his Catholic Irish family. The Kelly family are seemingly working to get ahead in life, by owning horses and farming. One night at a bar (in April 1878), a local Victorian police officer, named Fitzpatrick, offers to buy Ned's sister, Kate, a drink. After several attempts, Kate insists she doesn't want one. Ned intervenes and hostilities ensue when fellow officers help Fitzpatrick out. Getting back at Ned, the Victorian police officers confiscate the Kellys' horses. Ned, his brother Dan and their friends (Steve Hart, Joe Byrne, Wild Wright) steal back their horses. One evening later, Fitzpatrick arrives at the Kelly house, while Ned is away, to visit Kate, only to be told that she doesn't want to see him. Officer Fitzpatrick tells them they have warrants for them, for horse stealing. A fight ensues, and Fizpatrick returns to the police office, telling the others that Ned Kelly shot him.

The Victorian police then arrest Ned's mother (in Ned's absence), and Ned, Dan, Steve and Joe become outlaws on the run. They later meet some police in the Victorian bushlands in October 1878, and kill Constable Lonnigan, and two other officers in a shootout. For the following months the Kelly gang avoid capture, living in the outback, often without food. The colonial government sends in Superintendent Francis Hare, who arrests many people including Joe Byrne's life-long friend, Aaron Sherrit. Sherrit, being told that they don't want to harm his friend Joe, but only wants the Kellys, provides a location where the gang might be. Byrne learns of this, and arrives one night (26 June, 1880) armed with a loaded shotgun and kills Aaron.

The next day (Sunday 27 June) the Kelly gang take over the town of Glenrowan, taking about seventy hostages at the Glenrowan Inn, but also winning the trust of the townspeople there. Hare and the police are set to capture the gang, and their train is saved from derailment by a released hostage. The police then lay siege to the inn at dawn on 28 June. The Kelly gang, using plate metal body armour, emerge from the inn and begin shooting, but are forced inside again. Joe Byrne is shot and dies inside the inn. Morning passes, and the police wonder where the outlaws are. Ned then re-emerges from the inn but is shot in the arms and legs and falls. Dan and Steve, thinking all is lost, commit suicide. Ned regains consciousness, and even though gravely injured, continues to fire at the police. He finally is shot to the ground and taken down.

Loaded on a train, Ned's beloved green sash is given to Hare as the train steers away. It was noted that even with a pardon, which had a petition of over 30,000 signatures, Ned Kelly was sentenced to death for the murder of Constable Lonigan, and hanged at Old Melbourne Gaol on 11 November, 1880.

Cast

Reception

The film was not a universal success and the makers insisted on giving Australian-born Kelly an Irish accent although there is no evidence that he spoke with anything other than an Australian accent(Although it is probable that the Kelly household spoke with an Irish accent since he was a first-generation Australian whose parents emigrated from Ireland to Australia well into their adulthood). In total, the film grossed $6,585,516 worldwide.[2] It received mixed reviews, with a 55% Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[3] One review of the film comments "Heath Ledger gives a solid performance in the lead but Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush are woefully underused."[4] BBC film reviewer Nev Pierce gave the film 3 out of 5 stars, stating "there is some impressive action, albeit great scenes rather than sequences", concluding with "a rousing, watchable western".[5] Jay Richardson from FutureMovies.co.uk stated "this is a competent and blandly enjoyable film with a solid central performance from Heath Ledger".[6] Megan Spencer from ABC.Net said "Thankfully Ned Kelly is a very cinematic Australian film, the international and local cast and crew made the most of their $30 million budget. And some of the best sequences are due in part to Heath Ledger's well delivered internal dialogue voice over, giving an inner life to the musings of a troubled anti-hero".[7] Clint Morris, a reviewer from Film Threat, who gave the film 3 and half stars out of 5, said "It’s an exciting movie filled with plenty of action, adventure, beautiful cinematography and best of all, terrific performances..." while praising Heath Ledger: "Heath Ledger is fantastic as Kelly. He gives a very immersing performance, and has misshapen himself into the character. When he wears that infamous tin helmet in the finale, we actually feel that’s the real deal".[8]

More critically one review describes the battle for Glenrowan, with masses of police and civilian casualties, along with a lion and monkey as "fictional nonsense".[9]

References

External links


Ned Kelly
File:Ned kelly
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Gregor Jordan
Produced by Lynda House
Nelson Woss
Written by Robert Drewe (novel)
John Michael McDonagh
Starring Heath Ledger
Orlando Bloom
Naomi Watts
Geoffrey Rush
Music by Klaus Badelt
Cinematography Oliver Stapleton
Editing by Jon Gregory
Studio StudioCanal
Working Title Films
Australian Film Commission
Film Finance Corporation Australia
The Woss Group
Endymion Films
Distributed by Focus Features (USA)
Universal Pictures(UK)
UIP
Release date(s) 27 March 2003 (2003-03-27)
Running time 120 minutes
Country Australia
Language English

Ned Kelly is an Australian film directed by Gregor Jordan. The film portrays the life of Ned Kelly — a legendary bushranger in northeast Victoria. Ned Kelly, his brother Dan, and two other men — Steve Hart and Joe Byrne — formed a gang of Irish Australians in response to Irish and English tensions that arose in 19th century Australia. The film is mainly based on Robert Drewe's book Our Sunshine.[1] Heath Ledger plays the title role as Edward 'Ned' Kelly.

Contents

Plot

The film starts out with a young Ned Kelly rescuing a young boy from drowning. The film then pans to the Australian bush with Ned talking about his father. He then awakes in the Australian outback, and sees a white mare. He rides it into town, only to be arrested, and subsequently imprisoned in 1871, for supposedly stealing the horse (even though it had actually been stolen by Wild Wright, Ned's friend).

Three years later Ned is released, and comes home to a warm welcome from his Catholic Irish family. The Kelly family are seemingly working to get ahead in life, by owning horses and farming. One night at a bar (in April 1878), a local Victorian police officer, named Fitzpatrick, offers to buy Ned's sister, Kate, a drink. After several attempts, Kate insists she doesn't want one. Ned intervenes and hostilities ensue when fellow officers help Fitzpatrick out. Getting back at Ned, the Victorian police officers confiscate the Kellys' horses. Ned, his brother Dan and their friends (Steve Hart, Joe Byrne, Wild Wright) steal back their horses. One evening later, Fitzpatrick arrives at the Kelly house, while Ned is away, to visit Kate, only to be told that she doesn't want to see him. Officer Fitzpatrick tells them they have warrants for them, for horse stealing. A fight ensues, and Fizpatrick returns to the police office, telling the others that Ned Kelly shot him.

The Victorian police then arrest Ned's mother (in Ned's absence), and Ned, Dan, Steve and Joe become outlaws on the run. They later meet some police in the Victorian bushlands in October 1878, and kill Constable Lonnigan, and two other officers in a shootout. For the following months the Kelly gang avoid capture, living in the outback, often without food. The colonial government sends in Superintendent Francis Hare, who arrests many people including Joe Byrne's life-long friend, Aaron Sherrit. Sherrit, being told that they don't want to harm his friend Joe, but only wants the Kellys, provides a location where the gang might be. Byrne learns of this, and arrives one night (26 June, 1880) armed with a loaded shotgun and kills Aaron.

The next day (Sunday 27 June) the Kelly gang take over the town of Glenrowan, taking about seventy hostages at the Glenrowan Inn, but also winning the trust of the townspeople there. Hare and the police are set to capture the gang, and their train is saved from derailment by a released hostage. The police then lay siege to the inn at dawn on 28 June. The Kelly gang, using plate metal body armour, emerge from the inn and begin shooting, but are forced inside again. Joe Byrne is shot and dies inside the inn. Morning passes, and the police wonder where the outlaws are. Ned then re-emerges from the inn but is shot in the arms and legs and falls. Dan and Steve, thinking all is lost, commit suicide. Ned regains consciousness, and even though gravely injured, continues to fire at the police. He finally is shot to the ground and taken down.

Loaded on a train, Ned's beloved green sash is given to Hare as the train steers away. It was noted that even with a pardon, which had a petition of over 30,000 signatures, Ned Kelly was sentenced to death for the murder of Constable Lonigan, and hanged at Old Melbourne Gaol on 11 November, 1880.

Cast

Reception

The film was not a universal success. In total, the film grossed $6,585,516 worldwide.[2] It received mixed reviews, with a 55% Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[3] One review of the film comments "Heath Ledger gives a solid performance in the lead but Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush are woefully underused."[4] BBC film reviewer Nev Pierce gave the film 3 out of 5 stars, stating "there is some impressive action, albeit great scenes rather than sequences", concluding with "a rousing, watchable western".[5] Jay Richardson from FutureMovies.co.uk stated "this is a competent and blandly enjoyable film with a solid central performance from Heath Ledger".[6] Megan Spencer from ABC.Net said "Thankfully Ned Kelly is a very cinematic Australian film, the international and local cast and crew made the most of their $30 million budget. And some of the best sequences are due in part to Heath Ledger's well delivered internal dialogue voice over, giving an inner life to the musings of a troubled anti-hero".[7] Clint Morris, a reviewer from Film Threat, who gave the film 3 and half stars out of 5, said "It’s an exciting movie filled with plenty of action, adventure, beautiful cinematography and best of all, terrific performances..." while praising Heath Ledger: "Heath Ledger is fantastic as Kelly. He gives a very immersing performance, and has misshapen himself into the character. When he wears that infamous tin helmet in the finale, we actually feel that’s the real deal".[8]

More critically one review describes the battle for Glenrowan, with masses of police and civilian casualties, along with a lion and monkey as "fictional nonsense".[9]

See also

References

External links








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