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Nero
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Nero 1.JPG
Bust of Nero at Musei Capitolini, Rome
Reign 13 October, AD 54 – 9 June, AD 68
(Proconsul from 51)
Full name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
(from birth to AD 50);
Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus (from 50 to accession);
Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (as emperor)
Born 15 December 37(37-12-15)
Birthplace Antium
Died 9 June 68 (aged 30)
Place of death Just outside Rome
Buried Mausoleum of the Domitii Ahenobarbi, Pincian Hill, Rome
Predecessor Claudius
Successor Galba
Wives Claudia Octavia
Poppaea Sabina
Statilia Messalina
Offspring Claudia Augusta
Dynasty Julio-Claudian
Father Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
Mother Agrippina the Younger
.Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (15 December AD 37 – 9 June AD 68),[1] born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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^ Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus , also called ( AD 50–54) Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus , original name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus .
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero (Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus) was born (d.
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.Nero was adopted by his great uncle Claudius to become heir to the throne.^ (HN, 3/18/99) 37CE Dec 15, Nero Claudius Caesar, emperor of Rome who is blamed for the great fire of Rome, was born.
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^ Nero (37-68CE), son of Agrippina, succeeded his great uncle Claudius, who was murdered by his wife, as the new emperor of Rome.
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.As Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, he succeeded to the throne on 13 October 54, following Claudius's death.^ Flavius Josephus, the Jewish contemporary of John, clearly points out that Julius Caesar was the first emperor of Rome and that he was followed in succession by Augustus, Tiberius, Caius, Claudius, and, sixthly, Nero (Antiquities, books 18 and 19).
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mint at Caesarea, Cappadocia.NERO CLAVD DIVI CLAVD F CAESAR AVG GERMA, laureate head of Nero right / DIVOS CLAVD AVGVST GERMANIC PATER AVG, laureate head of Claudius right.
  • Nero, Roman Imperial Coinage of, Thumbnail Index - WildWinds.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.wildwinds.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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.Nero ruled from 54 to 68, focusing much of his attention on diplomacy, trade, and increasing the cultural capital of the empire.^ Nero 54-68 .
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (SFC, 6/18/02, p.A2) 68CE Jun 9, Nero (31), Roman Emperor (54-68), committed suicide.
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He ordered the building of theaters and promoted athletic games. .His reign included a successful war and negotiated peace with the Parthian Empire (58–63), the suppression of the British revolt (60–61) and improving relations with Greece.^ Nero's reign was not without military operations (e.g., the campaigns of Corbulo against the Parthians, the suppression of the revolt of Boudicca in Britain), but his neglect of the armies was a critical error.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Envoys from Rome included the Stoic philosopher Musonius Rufus, whose lectures to the soldiers on the blessings of peace and the dangers of war were greeted with laughter and derision.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Revolts broke out in Britain (60-61) and in Judaea (66-70).
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.The First Roman-Jewish War (66–70) started during his reign.^ Judean and Roman Wars 66-70 .
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Peter is first said to have been crucified upside down in Rome during Nero's reign (but not by Nero) in the apocryphal Acts of Peter (c.
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^ In the Jewish War the Israelites tried unsuccessfully to revolt against Roman rule.
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In 68 a military coup drove Nero from the throne. Facing assassination, he committed suicide on 9 June 68.[2]
Nero's rule is often associated with tyranny and extravagance.[3] .He is known for a number of executions, including those of his mother[4] and stepbrother, and as the emperor who "fiddled while Rome burned",[5] and as an early persecutor of Christians.^ The most famous story connected to Nero is that he "fiddled while Rome burned".
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (HN, 11/20/98) 270 cFeb 14, The early Christian martyr, St. Valentine, was beheaded by Emperor Claudius II, who executed another St. Valentine around the same time.
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^ Some of the featured groups I’m interviewing are those who have been run through the penal system (including those who are still in it.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.This view is based upon the main surviving sources for Nero's reign—Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio.^ In the reign of Nero, his general, Suetonius Paulinus, attacked Mona or Anglesey, the chief seat of the Druids, and extirpated them with great cruelty.

^ Boito elides the descriptions of his crimes that we find in Suetonius, Tacitus and Dio with the Sadean theatres of cruelty that they also disturbingly prefigure.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ancient Sources: Tacitus, Annales, Books 13-16; Suetonius, Nero; Dio Cassius, Roman History, Books 61-63; cf.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

Few surviving sources paint Nero in a favorable light.[6] .Some sources, though, including some mentioned above, portray him as an emperor who was popular with the common Roman people, especially in the East.^ Nero was popular with many Romans, who enjoyed the gory spectacles he staged in his arenas.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet some of the astrologers promised him, in his forlorn state, the rule of the East, and some in express words the kingdom of Jerusalem.

^ He became the great Roman emperor (324-337) who adopted Christianity.
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[7] .The study of Nero is problematic as some modern historians question the reliability of ancient sources when reporting on Nero's tyrannical acts.^ However, modern scholarship has emphasised that the ancient historians were dealing with a figure that had already passed from history into legend when they began their chronicles.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ancient Sources: Tacitus, Annales, Books 13-16; Suetonius, Nero; Dio Cassius, Roman History, Books 61-63; cf.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ My upbringing has lead me to many beliefs..and through my own studies some of my questions have been answered and others have not.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[8]

Contents

Early life

Roman imperial dynasties
Julio-Claudian dynasty
Chronology
Augustus 27 BC14 AD
Tiberius 14 AD37 AD
Caligula 37 AD41 AD
Claudius 41 AD54 AD
Nero 54 AD68 AD
Family
Gens Julia
Gens Claudia
Julio-Claudian family tree
Category:Julio-Claudian Dynasty
Succession
Preceded by
Roman Republic
Followed by
Year of the Four Emperors

Family

.Nero was born on 15 December, AD 37, in Antium, near Rome.^ Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, DBA the emperor Nero Antium, 12°38 E, 41°26.5 N December 15, A.D. 37, sunrise House division according to Porphyry's system (first extant description in Vettius Valens, about a century after Nero) .
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Apr 15, Leonardo da Vinci (d.1519), Italian painter, sculptor, scientist and visionary, was born in Vinci near Florence.
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^ (HN, 3/18/99) 37CE Dec 15, Nero Claudius Caesar, emperor of Rome who is blamed for the great fire of Rome, was born.
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[9][10] .He was the only son of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and second and third cousin Agrippina the Younger, sister of emperor Caligula.^ The elder became the wife of his son Hunneric; the younger, with her mother, was eventually surrendered to the emperor Leo.
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^ Thus the first, second, and third of the Ahenobarbi, we are told, were called Lucius, the next three in order Gnaeus, while all those that followed were called in turn first Lucius and then Gnaeus.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero (37-68CE), son of Agrippina, succeeded his great uncle Claudius, who was murdered by his wife, as the new emperor of Rome.
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.Lucius' father was the grandson of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Aemilia Lepida through their son Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus.^ Nero (Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus) was born (d.
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^ Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus , also called ( AD 50–54) Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus , original name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus .
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Early Life and Reign The death of Claudius in 54 A.D., generally thought to have been planned and carried out by his wife Agrippina Minor, secured for her son Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus the place as emperor which she had so carefully arranged.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

Gnaeus was a grandson to Mark Antony and Octavia Minor through their daughters Antonia Major and Antonia Minor, by each parent. With Octavia, he was the grandnephew of Caesar Augustus. .Nero's father had been employed as a praetor and was a member of Caligula's staff when the latter traveled to the East.^ She traveled to various cities, from Rome to London--the latter to visit her father.
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[11] .Nero's father was described by Suetonius as a murderer and a cheat who was charged by emperor Tiberius with treason, adultery, and incest.^ After his father died, he was adopted by Emperor Tiberius .
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Just before the death of Tiberius he was also charged with treason, as well as with acts of adultery and incest with his sister Lepida, but escaped owing to the change of rulers and died of dropsy at Pyrgi, after acknowledging 12 Nero son of Agrippina, the daughter of Germanicus.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Suetonius is in error here; it was the father of the tribune who defeated the Allobroges.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11] Tiberius died, allowing him to escape these charges.[11] .Nero's father died of edema (or "dropsy") in 39 AD when Nero was three.^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero Caesar died BEFORE AD 96 on June 9th, AD 68.
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[11]
.Lucius' mother was Agrippina the Younger, who was great-granddaughter to Caesar Augustus and his wife Scribonia through their daughter Julia the Elder and her husband Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.^ Mother: Agrippina the younger .
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^ After Pompey's wife (and Caesar's daughter) Julia died, their alliance was shattered.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's mother, Agrippina the younger, daughter of Germanicus and of Agrippina the elder, was assassinated at Nero's command in 60 a.d.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.Agrippina's father, Germanicus, was grandson to Augustus's wife, Livia, on one side and to Mark Antony and Octavia on the other.^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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^ (RFH-MDHP, p.214) 32BC A Roman coin dating from this time bore the images of Cleopatra on one side and Marc Antony on the reverse.
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^ Nero became involved with the freedwoman Acte and resented his mother taking the side of his wife Octavia; Agrippina had to retire from the palace.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Germanicus' mother Antonia Minor, was a daughter of Octavia Minor and Mark Antony.^ Nero's mother, Agrippina the younger, daughter of Germanicus and of Agrippina the elder, was assassinated at Nero's command in 60 a.d.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

Octavia was Augustus' second elder sister. Germanicus was also the adoptive son of Tiberius. .A number of ancient historians accuse Agrippina of murdering her third husband, emperor Claudius.^ Nero (37-68CE), son of Agrippina, succeeded his great uncle Claudius, who was murdered by his wife, as the new emperor of Rome.
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^ Trajan) 54CE Oct 13, Roman emperor Claudius I died, after being poisoned with mushrooms by his wife, Agrippina.
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[12]
See Roman Emperors family tree.

Physical appearance

In the book "The Lives of the Twelve Caesars" the Roman historian Suetonius describes Nero as "about the average height, his body marked with spots and malodorous, his hair light blond, his features regular rather than attractive, his eyes blue and somewhat weak, his neck over thick, his belly prominent, and his legs very slender."[13]

Rise to power

.Nero was not expected ever to become emperor because his maternal uncle, Caligula, had begun his reign at the age of 25 with ample time to produce his own heir.^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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^ On June 11 AD68, Emperor Nero died at a villa owned by one of his freedmen on the outskirts of Rome.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Some suppose this to be spoken of the Roman emperor, and therefore Paul did not speak in plain words, because he would not incur the charge of calumny for having spoken evil of the Roman emperor: although he always expected that what he had said would be understood as applying to Nero."
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.Lucius' mother, Agrippina, lost favor with Caligula and was exiled in 39 after her husband's death.^ In their place that year appeared a counselor, Gaius Ofonius Tigellinus, who had been exiled in 39 A.D. by Caius (Caligula) for adultery with Agrippina, but who returned to find favor with Nero and a post for himself as praetorian prefect, from which position he exerted a further degenerating influence on Nero.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[14] .Caligula seized Lucius's inheritance and sent him to be raised by his less wealthy aunt, Domitia Lepida, who was the mother of Valeria Messalina, Claudius's third wife.^ Appius Silanus, the former governor of Spain, was recalled to marry the mother of Claudius' wife Messalina; but when he refused to be Messalina's lover (according to Dio Cassius), Narcissus got him executed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If thou so will, mother, and hast confidence in the God of Peter, we will take him up and carry him thither that he may raise him up and restore him unto thee.

^ Claudius was also greatly influenced by his wife Messalina, who along with the imperial freedmen sold citizenship rights for money.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[10]
.Caligula, his wife Caesonia and their infant daughter Julia Drusilla were murdered on January 24, 41.[15] These events led Claudius, Caligula's uncle, to become emperor.^ On January 15 Otho was proclaimed Emperor as Galba was beheaded in the forum.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ [WUD says 37-93CE] (WUD, 1994, p.29) 41 Jan 24, Shortly after declaring himself a god, Gaius Caligula Germanicus, emperor from 37-41, was assassinated by two Praetorian tribunes.
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^ In 41 two officers of his praetorian guard killed him; his wife Caesonia, whom he had married after she bore him a daughter, was also killed along with the child.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[16] Claudius allowed Agrippina to return from exile.[10]
Coin issued under Claudius celebrating young Nero as the future emperor, c. 50
.Claudius had married twice before marrying Valeria Messalina.^ Flagrant guilt requires audacity."1 Messalina agreed to marry Silius while Claudius was sacrificing at Ostia.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[17] His previous marriages produced three children including a son, Drusus, who died at a young age.[18] He had two children with Messalina - Claudia Octavia (b. 40) and Britannicus (b. 41).[18] .Messalina was executed by Claudius in the year 48.[17] In 49, Claudius married a fourth time, to Agrippina.^ Then Pallas persuaded Claudius to marry his own niece Agrippina the same year.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Eight years later in 49 Seneca was recalled to Rome by the new empress Agrippina to tutor her son Nero; the next year he was appointed praetor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Agrippina eliminated enemies with private trials and executions, aiming to have Nero supplant Claudius' son Britannicus, who, born in 41, was three years younger than Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[18] .To aid Claudius politically, Lucius was officially adopted in 50 and renamed Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus (see adoption in Rome).^ Before his death, Claudius, though he already had a son Britannicus, had adopted Lucius, who changed his name to Nero Claudius Caesar, (a great-great-grandson of Augustus) at Agrippina's instigation; instrumental too in the transfer of power was the influence of Seneca, Nero's tutor, and of Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (HN, 3/18/99) 37CE Dec 15, Nero Claudius Caesar, emperor of Rome who is blamed for the great fire of Rome, was born.
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^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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[19] Nero was older than his stepbrother, Britannicus, and became heir to the throne.[20]
.Nero was proclaimed an adult in 51 at the age of 14.[21] He was appointed proconsul, entered and first addressed the Senate, made joint public appearances with Claudius, and was featured in coinage.^ Nero snatching it from his hand read that he had been pronounced a public enemy by the senate, and that they were seeking him to punish in the ancient fashion; 150 and he asked what manner of punishment that was.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Returning from Greece, since it was at Naples that he had made his first appearance, he entered that city with white horses through a part of the wall which had been thrown down, as is customary with victors in the sacred games.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ While the Senate debated whether to restore the republic, the praetorian guard made Claudius Emperor, encouraged by his promise of 15,000 sesterces for each guard.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[21] .In 53, he married his stepsister Claudia Octavia.^ In 53 Nero married Octavia, the daughter of Claudius.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[22]

Emperor

Early rule

Aureus of Nero and his mother, Agrippina, c. 54.
.Claudius died in 54 and Nero was established as emperor.^ Nero's Early Life and Reign The death of Claudius in 54 A.D., generally thought to have been planned and carried out by his wife Agrippina Minor, secured for her son Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus the place as emperor which she had so carefully arranged.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dec 15] (MC, 2/15/02) 37 Mar 16, Tiberius Claudius Nero (78), Roman emperor (14-37), died on a trip to the Italian mainland from his home on Capreae.
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^ (HN, 3/18/99) 37CE Dec 15, Nero Claudius Caesar, emperor of Rome who is blamed for the great fire of Rome, was born.
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.Though accounts vary greatly, many ancient historians state Agrippina poisoned Claudius.^ As the health of Claudius deteriorated with drinking and gluttony, in 54 he was poisoned with mushrooms probably by Agrippina and her lover Pallas.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Trajan) 54CE Oct 13, Roman emperor Claudius I died, after being poisoned with mushrooms by his wife, Agrippina.
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^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[12] .It is not known how much Nero knew or was involved in the death of Claudius.^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[23]
.Nero became emperor at 16, the youngest emperor up until that time.^ But when Claudius became emperor, Nero not only recovered his father's property, but was also enriched by an inheritance from his stepfather, Passienus Crispus.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Date: 31 Jan 2009 Time: 04:47:04 Your Comments: nero!!!you are the most worst roman emperor....
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[24] .Ancient historians describe Nero's early reign as being strongly influenced by his mother Agrippina, his tutor Lucius Annaeus Seneca, and the Praetorian Prefect Sextus Afranius Burrus, especially in the first year.^ Senator Annaeus Seneca was recalled from exile and became Nero's tutor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Before his death, Claudius, though he already had a son Britannicus, had adopted Lucius, who changed his name to Nero Claudius Caesar, (a great-great-grandson of Augustus) at Agrippina's instigation; instrumental too in the transfer of power was the influence of Seneca, Nero's tutor, and of Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In their place that year appeared a counselor, Gaius Ofonius Tigellinus, who had been exiled in 39 A.D. by Caius (Caligula) for adultery with Agrippina, but who returned to find favor with Nero and a post for himself as praetorian prefect, from which position he exerted a further degenerating influence on Nero.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[25] Other tutors were less often mentioned, such as Alexander of Aegae.[26]
.Very early in Nero's rule, problems arose from competition for influence between Agrippina and Nero's two main advisers, Seneca and Burrus.^ When the military advisor Burrus died in 62, apparently unable to control Nero's crimes, Seneca decided to request retirement.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Since Nero was only an adolescent, the early part of his reign was characterized by direction from these older figures, including Agrippina herself.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ She got Burrus appointed commander of the praetorian guard, and two years later her son Nero was adopted by the Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Seneca and Nero, after Eduardo Barrón, Cordoba, Spain.
.In 54, Agrippina tried to sit down next to Nero while he met with an Armenian envoy, but Seneca stopped her and prevented a scandalous scene.^ Poppaea became Nero's mistress in 58 A.D., and the next year Agrippina herself was murdered, with Nero's knowledge.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eight years later in 49 Seneca was recalled to Rome by the new empress Agrippina to tutor her son Nero; the next year he was appointed praetor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He had asked Seneca how he could stop his mental vacillations that prevent tranquillity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[27] .Nero's personal friends also mistrusted Agrippina and told Nero to beware of his mother.^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The play is set in 62, three years after Nero has murdered his mother Agrippina.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero became involved with the freedwoman Acte and resented his mother taking the side of his wife Octavia; Agrippina had to retire from the palace.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[28] .Nero was reportedly unsatisfied with his marriage to Octavia and entered into an affair with Claudia Acte, a former slave.^ After the murder of his wife, Octavia, Nero descended deep into a religious delirium.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[29] In 55, Agrippina attempted to intervene in favor of Octavia and demanded that her son dismiss Acte. .Nero, with the support of Seneca, resisted the intervention of his mother in his personal affairs.^ Did Seneca regret having been complicit in Nero's murder of his mother?
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[30]
.With Agrippina's influence over her son severed, she reportedly began pushing for Britannicus, Nero's stepbrother, to become emperor.^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Eight years later in 49 Seneca was recalled to Rome by the new empress Agrippina to tutor her son Nero; the next year he was appointed praetor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Early Life and Reign The death of Claudius in 54 A.D., generally thought to have been planned and carried out by his wife Agrippina Minor, secured for her son Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus the place as emperor which she had so carefully arranged.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[30] Nearly fifteen-year-old Britannicus, heir-designate prior to Nero's adoption, was still legally a minor, but was approaching legal adulthood.[30] .According to Tacitus, Agrippina hoped that with her support, Britannicus, being the blood son of Claudius, would be seen as the true heir to the throne by the state over Nero.^ Claudius was deified, and Nero could claim he was the son of a god.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Early Life and Reign The death of Claudius in 54 A.D., generally thought to have been planned and carried out by his wife Agrippina Minor, secured for her son Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus the place as emperor which she had so carefully arranged.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Before his death, Claudius, though he already had a son Britannicus, had adopted Lucius, who changed his name to Nero Claudius Caesar, (a great-great-grandson of Augustus) at Agrippina's instigation; instrumental too in the transfer of power was the influence of Seneca, Nero's tutor, and of Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[30] .However, the youth died suddenly and suspiciously on 12 February, 55, the very day before his proclamation as an adult had been set.^ As I said before, in my own public policy, I'm very suspicious of religious certainty expressing itself in politics.
  • Obama's Fascinating Interview with Cathleen Falsani - Steven Waldman 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC blog.beliefnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This very sinful man who died before AD 96 was a KING in the Roman Empire as per Daniel 7:24.
  • Obama's Fascinating Interview with Cathleen Falsani - Steven Waldman 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC blog.beliefnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[31] .Nero claimed that Britannicus died from an epileptic seizure, but ancient historians all claim Britannicus' death came from Nero's poisoning him.^ While earlier emperors were proclaimed deities upon their deaths, Nero abandons all reserve and demanded divine honors while still alive (as did also Caligula before him, AD 37-41).
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The historians of antiquity present Nero’s death as a morally apt conclusion to a life synonymous with tyranny, libertinage and excess.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[32] .After the death of Britannicus, Agrippina was accused of slandering Octavia and Nero ordered her out of the imperial residence.^ A mob has gathered on Octavia's behalf, and Nero orders it tamed by suffering oppression.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero became involved with the freedwoman Acte and resented his mother taking the side of his wife Octavia; Agrippina had to retire from the palace.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Her brother Britannicus was ordered killed by her husband Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[33]

Matricide and consolidation of power

Coin of Nero and Poppaea Sabina
.Over time, Nero became progressively more powerful, freeing himself of his advisers and eliminating rivals to the throne.^ Nero became more tyrannical, and Tigellinus was ordered to track down suspects.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Augustus, however, had not been much older when he began his bid for power, and so a great deal of the responsibility for Nero's conduct must also rest with the man himself.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero had the city rebuilt in a more ordered pattern, but he also planned extravagant gardens, palaces, and an enormous statue of himself.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

In 55, he removed Marcus Antonius Pallas, an ally of Agrippina, from his position in the treasury.[30] Pallas, along with Burrus, was accused of conspiring against the emperor to bring Faustus Sulla to the throne.[34] Seneca was accused of having relations with Agrippina and embezzlement.[35] .Seneca succeeded in having himself, Pallas and Burrus acquitted.^ According to Tacitus, Burrus and Seneca prevented other murders; disliking rule by a woman, they gained control by replacing Pallas.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[35] .According to Cassius Dio, at this time, Seneca and Burrus reduced their role in governing from careful management to mere moderation of Nero.^ As Dio says (62.24) "they desired at the same time to be rid of these evils and to give Nero his release from them.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ According to Tacitus, Burrus and Seneca prevented other murders; disliking rule by a woman, they gained control by replacing Pallas.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[36]
.In 58, Nero became romantically involved with Poppaea Sabina, the wife of his friend and future emperor Otho.^ When Nero became involved with Poppaea Sabina, he had her husband Otho sent to Lusitania as governor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But we have no reason for impeaching Tacitus' accuracy in this case, especially since we remember that the Jews enjoyed favor with Nero through his wife Poppaea.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Poppaea became Nero's mistress in 58 A.D., and the next year Agrippina herself was murdered, with Nero's knowledge.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[37] .Reportedly because a marriage to Poppaea and a divorce from Octavia did not seem politically feasible with Agrippina alive, Nero ordered the murder of his mother in 59.[38] A number of modern historians find this an unlikely motive as Nero did not marry Poppaea until 62.[39] Additionally, according to Suetonius, Poppaea did not divorce her husband until after Agrippina's death, making it unlikely that the already married Poppaea would be pressing Nero for marriage.^ Did Seneca regret having been complicit in Nero's murder of his mother?
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (NGM, 5/77) 62 CE Nero murdered his wife Octavia.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[40] .Some modern historians theorize that Nero's execution of Agrippina was prompted by her plotting to set Rubellius Plautus on the throne.^ The play is set in 62, three years after Nero has murdered his mother Agrippina.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Tigellinus gained power by appealing to Nero's vices; aristocrats, such as Cornelius Sulla in Gaul and Rubellius Plautus in Asia, were soon being executed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[41] .According to Suetonius, Nero tried to kill his mother through a planned shipwreck, which took the life of her friend, Acerronia Polla, but when Agrippina survived, he had her executed and framed it as a suicide.^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Then 960 people killed each other in a suicide pact; only two women and five children survived.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Although his two brothers and mother were killed, Caligula managed to survive by joining in the perversions of the Emperor at Capri for six years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[42] The incident is also recorded by Tacitus.[43]
The Remorse of Nero after Killing his Mother, by John William Waterhouse, 1878.
.In 62 Nero's adviser, Burrus, died.^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When the military advisor Burrus died in 62, apparently unable to control Nero's crimes, Seneca decided to request retirement.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[44] Additionally, Seneca was again faced with embezzlement charges.[45] .Seneca asked Nero for permission to retire from public affairs.^ Nero snatching it from his hand read that he had been pronounced a public enemy by the senate, and that they were seeking him to punish in the ancient fashion; 150 and he asked what manner of punishment that was.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca asks if this is just treatment; but Nero replies that justice is for those who have no need to fear.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[46] .Nero divorced and banished Octavia on grounds of infertility, leaving him free to marry the pregnant Poppaea.^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 53 Nero married Octavia, the daughter of Claudius.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His wife Octavia must die so that he can marry the beautiful Poppaea.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[47] .After public protests, Nero was forced to allow Octavia to return from exile,[47] but she was executed shortly after her return.^ After Secundus was murdered by his slaves in 61, the law allowed the execution of 400 slaves in his palace, although the urban commoners protested.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[48] .Nero also was reported to have kicked Poppaea to death in 65 before she could have his second child.^ Poppaea herself died from the effects of a kick given her by Nero while she was with child."
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Before his death the next year the novelist Petronius wrote out a list of Nero's male and female bed partners.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[49] .However, modern historians, noting Suetonius, Tacitus and Cassius Dio's possible bias against Nero and the likelihood that they did not have eyewitness accounts of private events, postulate that Poppaea may have died because of complications of miscarriage or childbirth.^ However, modern scholarship has emphasised that the ancient historians were dealing with a figure that had already passed from history into legend when they began their chronicles.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As Dio says (62.24) "they desired at the same time to be rid of these evils and to give Nero his release from them.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[50]
.Accusations of treason being plotted against Nero and the Senate first appeared in 62.[51] The Senate ruled that Antistius, a praetor, should be put to death for speaking ill of Nero at a party.^ Nero’s death brought to an end the Julio-Claudian dynasty that had ruled Rome since Augustus, and its replacement required justification.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Governors should be selected by merit rather than by lot, making sure they speak the language and have affinity with the people they rule.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Emperor Nero was eighteen, he signed his first death warrant, commenting that he wished he had never learned to write.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Later, Nero ordered the exile of Fabricius Veiento who slandered the Senate in a book.^ Nero’s symbiotic relationship with his mother, who is determined to keep him under her thumb in order to rule through him, is the fulcrum around which the opera swings.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[52] .Tacitus writes that the roots of the conspiracy led by Gaius Calpurnius Piso began in this year.^ In 65 Gaius Calpurnius Piso led a conspiracy against Nero; 18 of the 41 prominent Romans implicated in the plot perished.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The next year he joined the conspiracy of Calpurnius to overthrow Nero and was forced to commit suicide at age 25 along with his father and his uncles Seneca and Gallio.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.To consolidate power, Nero executed a number of people in 62 and 63 including his rivals Pallas, Rubellius Plautus and Faustus Sulla.^ Nero enters requesting the decapitated heads of banished Plautus and Sulla.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Tigellinus gained power by appealing to Nero's vices; aristocrats, such as Cornelius Sulla in Gaul and Rubellius Plautus in Asia, were soon being executed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[53] .According to Suetonius, Nero "showed neither discrimination nor moderation in putting to death whomsoever he pleased" during this period.^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The prefect reports the mob is put down; but Nero is not satisfied with the deaths of only the ringleaders.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[54]
Nero's consolidation of power also included a slow usurping of authority from the Senate. .In 54, Nero promised to give the Senate powers equivalent to those under Republican rule.^ Nero’s symbiotic relationship with his mother, who is determined to keep him under her thumb in order to rule through him, is the fulcrum around which the opera swings.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[55] .By 65, senators complained that they had no power left and this led to the Pisonian conspiracy.^ Before they fled, the senators gave the consuls war powers.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But they may, perhaps, have meant no more than to express the identity of his character and his power with that of Satan.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 65 Gaius Calpurnius Piso led a conspiracy against Nero; 18 of the 41 prominent Romans implicated in the plot perished.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[56]

Administrative policies

Coin showing Nero distributing charity to a citizen. c. 64-66
Over the course of his reign, Nero often made rulings that pleased the lower class. Nero was criticised as being obsessed with being popular.[57]
Nero began his reign in 54 by promising the Senate more autonomy.[55] .In this first year, he forbade others to refer to him with regard to enactments, for which he was praised by the Senate.^ Ephraem Syrus, A.D. 370, Theodoret, A.D. 430, and a few other writers, seem to have regarded the Antichrist as the devil himself, rather than as his minister or an emanation from him.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[58] Nero was known for spending his time visiting brothels and taverns during this period.[58]
In 55, Nero began taking on a more active role as an administrator. .He was consul four times between 55 and 60. During this period, some ancient historians speak fairly well of Nero and contrast it with his later rule.^ And the witty jest that some made is still current, that it would have been well for the world if Nero’s father Domitius had had that kind of wife.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (SFEC, 7/13/97, p.T12) 600-290BCE The Samnites, an Oscan-speaking people, controlled the area of south central Italy during this period.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (SFC, 11/10/00, p.A14) 110 Million A well preserved baby fossil of the therapod Scipionyx from this time was later found in Italy.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[59]
Under Nero, restrictions were put on the amount of bail and fines.[60] Also, fees for lawyers were limited.[61] There was a discussion in the Senate on the misconduct of the freedmen class, and a strong demand was made that patrons should have the right of revoking freedom.[62] Nero supported the freedmen and ruled that patrons had no such right.[63] .The Senate tried to pass a law in which the crimes of one slave applied to all slaves within a household.^ (NG, 6/1988, p.739) 287BCE In Rome the plebeians passed a law that allowed the decisions of the assembly to override the Senate.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Oh, and according to Jesus's definition of the Law, we've ALL broken the Ten Commandments in one way or another.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Claudius tried to improve the quality of senators and knights by adding new ones and removing others.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Nero vetoed the measure.[64] .After tax collectors were accused of being too harsh to the poor, Nero transferred collection authority to lower commissioners.^ Raquel, A Tax-Collecting Messiah David T wrote: Raquel, I just found out today from your show that you are a tax collector.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[60] .Nero banned any magistrate or procurator from exhibiting public entertainment for fear that the venue was being used as a method to sway the populace.^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[65] .Additionally, there were many impeachments and removals of government officials along with arrests for extortion and corruption.^ After the US government arrested Pickard & Apperson in Kansas a few years ago and sentenced them to LIFE in prison, there has been a worldwide LSD drought.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[66] .When further complaints arose that the poor were being overly taxed, Nero attempted to repeal all indirect taxes.^ Nero suffers DAMNATIO MEMORIAE and rescission of all his acta (Judicial decisions are all wiped from the books, the abolition of taxes for Greece is invalid, Sept.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero reduced taxes and gave slaves permission to file civil complaints against unjust masters.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero even tried to promote free trade by removing indirect taxes, but this proved too difficult.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[67] The Senate convinced him this action would bankrupt the public treasury.[67] As a compromise, taxes were cut from 4.5% to 2.5%.[68] Additionally, secret government tax records were ordered to become public.[68] To lower the cost of food imports, merchant ships were declared tax-exempt.[68]
Nero's abandoned Corinth canal
In imitation of the Greeks, Nero built a number of gymnasiums and theatres.[69] Enormous gladiatorial shows were also held.[70] Nero also established the quinquennial Neronia.[69][70] The festival included games, poetry and theater. Historians indicate that there was a belief that theatre led to immorality.[69] Others considered that to have performers dressed in Greek clothing was old fashioned.[71] Some questioned the large public expenditure on entertainment.[71]
.In 64, Rome burned.^ In 64 a fire broke out and burned more than half of Rome in a week.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[72] Nero enacted a public relief effort[72] as well as significant reconstruction.[73] .A number of other major construction projects occurred in Nero's late reign.^ "It's a number puzzle -- the majority opinion seems to be that it refers to [the Roman emperor] Nero."
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

Nero had the marshes of Ostia filled with rubble from the fire. He erected the large Domus Aurea.[74] .In 67, Nero attempted to have a canal dug at the Isthmus of Corinth.^ At Corinth he announced Greek immunity from taxation while planning a canal through the isthmus.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[75] Ancient historians state that these projects and others exacerbated the drain on the State's budget.[76]
The economic policy of Nero is a point of debate among scholars. .According to ancient historians, Nero's construction projects were overly extravagant and the large number of expenditures under Nero left Italy "thoroughly exhausted by contributions of money" with "the provinces ruined."^ To raise money for these projects and for an ambitious and impractical canal from Ostia to Lake Avernus, Nero increased taxes and even put to death six large landowners in Africa.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The cathedral had been under construction for 125 years and was designed to be capped by the largest dome since the golden age of ancient Rome.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On his departure he presented the entire province with freedom 72 and at the same time gave the judges Roman citizenship p127 and a large sum of money.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

[77][78] .Modern historians, though, note that the period was riddled with deflation and that it is likely that Nero's spending came in the form of public works projects and charity intended to ease economic troubles.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[79]

Great Fire of Rome

.The Great Fire of Rome erupted on the night of 18 July to 19 July, AD 64. The fire started at the southeastern end of the Circus Maximus in shops selling flammable goods.^ This is very interesting since the evil city of the End-Times is called “BABYLON” 6 times in Revelation 14:8; 16:19; 17:5; 18:2,10,21.
  • Obama's Fascinating Interview with Cathleen Falsani - Steven Waldman 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC blog.beliefnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mark.” Apparently some Christians including Peter were inspired to call ROME “BABYLON” after Nero’s terrible persecution of Christians starting in AD 64.
  • Obama's Fascinating Interview with Cathleen Falsani - Steven Waldman 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC blog.beliefnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ July, 64 A.D. - The Great Fire of Rome - PBS "Though the infamous emperor Nero ruled Rome for less than two decades, his reign witnessed tremendous changes to the empire's capital city.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[72]
Sketch of Ancient graffiti portrait of Nero found at the Domus Tiberiana.
The extent of the fire is uncertain. .According to Tacitus, who was nine at the time of the fire, it spread quickly and burned for over five days.^ God hath avenged you on her: she shall be utterly burned with fire, for strong is the Lord God who judgeth her.'
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[80] It completely destroyed three of fourteen Roman districts and severely damaged seven.[80] .The only other historian who lived through the period and mentioned the fire is Pliny the Elder, who wrote about it in passing.^ Only the king who provides security to others is secure.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[81] .Other historians who lived through the period (including Josephus, Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch, and Epictetus) make no mention of it.^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the featured groups I’m interviewing are those who have been run through the penal system (including those who are still in it.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Sanhedrin appointed as governor of Galilee the historian Flavius Josephus, who was born in Jerusalem in 38 and in 64 had gained the friendship of Nero's wife Poppaea in Rome.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

It is uncertain who or what actually caused the fire — whether accident or arson.[72] .Suetonius and Cassius Dio favor Nero as the arsonist, so he could build a palatial complex.^ Ancient Sources: Tacitus, Annales, Books 13-16; Suetonius, Nero; Dio Cassius, Roman History, Books 61-63; cf.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet the historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius described his behavior as outdoing the many evils of Caligula.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.It is also said that Nero played the fiddle while Rome burned.^ The most famous story connected to Nero is that he "fiddled while Rome burned".
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[82] Tacitus mentions that Christians confessed to the crime, but it is not known whether these confessions were induced by torture.[83] However, fires started accidentally were common in ancient Rome.[84] In fact, Rome suffered another large fire in 69[85] and in 80.[86]
.It was said by Suetonius and Cassius Dio that Nero sang the "Sack of Ilium" in stage costume while the city burned.^ So the Roman soldiers burned and sacked the city.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Viewing the conflagration from the tower of Maecenas 121 and exulting, as he said, in "the beauty of the flames," he sang the whole of the "Sack of Ilium," 122 in his regular stage costume.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero returned from Antium and attempted to relieve the homeless, but a rumor spread that he sang his poem on the sacking of Troy.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[87] .Popular legend claims that Nero played the fiddle at the time of the fire, an anachronism based merely on the concept of the lyre, a stringed instrument associated with Nero and his performances.^ Megalomaniac that he was, Nero had coins minted in which he was called “almighty God” and “Savior.” Nero’s portrait also appears on coins as the god Apollo playing a lyre.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

(There were no fiddles in 1st-century Rome.) Tacitus's account, however, has Nero in Antium at the time of the fire.[88] .Tacitus also said that Nero playing his lyre and singing while the city burned was only rumor.^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Megalomaniac that he was, Nero had coins minted in which he was called “almighty God” and “Savior.” Nero’s portrait also appears on coins as the god Apollo playing a lyre.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For he said that there were two thousand three hundred days from the time that the abomination of Nero stood in the holy city, till its destruction.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[88]
.According to Tacitus, upon hearing news of the fire, Nero returned to Rome to organize a relief effort, which he paid for from his own funds.^ On June 11 AD68, Emperor Nero died at a villa owned by one of his freedmen on the outskirts of Rome.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ To counter rumors that Nero ordered the blaze so that he could rebuild and name a new city after himself, the fire was blamed on the unpopular Christians, whose secret rituals many misunderstood, resulting in the persecution of innocent people in Rome.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero did not return to Rome until 68 to find the city suffering a grain shortage.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[88] .After the fire, Nero opened his palaces to provide shelter for the homeless, and arranged for food supplies to be delivered in order to prevent starvation among the survivors.^ He eventually sheltered the homeless, however, and rebuilt the city taking measures against fire.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero had the city rebuilt in a more ordered pattern, but he also planned extravagant gardens, palaces, and an enormous statue of himself.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[88] In the wake of the fire, he made a new urban development plan. Houses after the fire were spaced out, built in brick, and faced by porticos on wide roads.[73] Nero also built a new palace complex known as the Domus Aurea in an area cleared by the fire. .This included lush artificial landscapes and a 30 meter statue of himself, the Colossus of Nero.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero had the city rebuilt in a more ordered pattern, but he also planned extravagant gardens, palaces, and an enormous statue of himself.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[74] The size of this complex is debated (from 100 to 300 acres).[89][90][91] To find the necessary funds for the reconstruction, tributes were imposed on the provinces of the empire.[92]
According to Tacitus, the population searched for a scapegoat and rumors held Nero responsible.[83] To deflect blame, Nero targeted Christians. .He ordered Christians to be thrown to dogs, while others were crucified and burned.^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[83]
Tacitus described the event:
.Consequently, to get rid of the report, Nero fastened the guilt and inflicted the most exquisite tortures on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians [or Chrestians[93]] by the populace.^ We may assume as probable (with Ewald and Renan) that it was through the suggestion of the Jews that Nero's attention was drawn to the Christians, and he was led to throw the guilt upon them, as a people whose habits would best give countenance to such a suspicion, and most easily excite the rage of the populace against them.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Mark.” Apparently some Christians including Peter were inspired to call ROME “BABYLON” after Nero’s terrible persecution of Christians in AD 64.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mark.” Apparently some Christians including Peter were inspired to call ROME “BABYLON” after Nero’s terrible persecution of Christians starting in AD 64.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome, where all things hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their centre and become popular.^ When I went to the psychiatrist I was the only one there, all the lights were out except one on his desk, curtains drawn, his secretary left and he did the hypnotic command where I almost went into a trance.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During 67 he traveled in Greece to compete in poetic and athletic festivals, claiming 1808 first prizes; at Olympia he was given the crown even though he fell out of his chariot.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Christian Burkinstine I highly doubt it's the "mark of the beast"...but i do think it part of a government conspiracy to create a one gov't world.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Accordingly, an arrest was first made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind.^ Whether Nero was guilty of all his reported crimes remains disputed.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He eventually sheltered the homeless, however, and rebuilt the city taking measures against fire.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was given power to give breath to the image of the first beast {666}, so that it could speak and cause all who refused to worship the image to be killed.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Mockery of every sort was added to their deaths. Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired.[83]

Public performances

Nero coin, c. 66. Ara Pacis on the reverse.
.Nero enjoyed driving a one-horse chariot, singing to the lyre and poetry.^ Since Seneca criticized Nero's amusements in charioteering and singing, they argued the Emperor no longer needed a tutor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[94] He even composed songs that were performed by other entertainers throughout the empire.[95] At first, Nero only performed for a private audience.[96]
In 64, Nero began singing in public in Neapolis in order to improve his popularity.[96] He also sang at the second quinquennial Neronia in 65.[97] It was said that Nero craved the attention,[98] but historians also write that Nero was encouraged to sing and perform in public by the Senate, his inner circle and the people.[99] Ancient historians strongly criticize his choice to perform, calling it shameful.[100]
Nero was convinced to participate in the Olympic Games of 67 in order to improve relations with Greece and display Roman dominance.[101] .As a competitor, Nero raced a ten-horse chariot and nearly died after being thrown from it.^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[102] He also performed as an actor and a singer.[103] .Though Nero faltered in his racing (in one case, dropping out entirely before the end) and acting competitions,[102] he won these crowns nevertheless and paraded them when he returned to Rome.^ Nero is recorded as one of the worst Emperors that Rome endured.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Before his death the next year the novelist Petronius wrote out a list of Nero's male and female bed partners.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On June 11 AD68, Emperor Nero died at a villa owned by one of his freedmen on the outskirts of Rome.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

[102] The victories are attributed to Nero bribing the judges and his status as emperor.[104]

War and peace with Parthia

.Shortly after Nero's accession to the throne in 55, the Roman vassal kingdom of Armenia overthrew their prince Rhadamistus and he was replaced with the Parthian prince Tiridates.^ A winter epidemic forced the Parthians to withdraw from Armenia, allowing Radamistus to come back and punish people as traitors; but they soon replaced him with his brother Tiridates.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In Asia Roman general Domitius Corbulo captured and burned Artaxata and in 59 drove Tiridates out of Armenia, establishing Tigranes on the throne there.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Paetus was dismissed, and Corbulo negotiated a treaty recognizing as king of Armenia the Parthian Tiridates.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[105] This was seen as a Parthian invasion of Roman territory.[105] There was concern in Rome over how the young emperor would handle the situation.[106] Nero reacted by immediately sending the military to the region under the command of Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo.[107] The Parthians temporarily relinquished control of Armenia to Rome.[108]
.The peace did not last and full-scale war broke out in 58. The Parthian king Vologases I refused to remove his brother Tiridates from Armenia.^ A winter epidemic forced the Parthians to withdraw from Armenia, allowing Radamistus to come back and punish people as traitors; but they soon replaced him with his brother Tiridates.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ BCE War broke out between Carthage and Rome.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Dacian war led by Decebalus in Moesia broke out in 85 and was not ended until 88 when two legions at Moguntiacum led by Antonius Saturninus also revolted.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[109] The Parthians began a full-scale invasion of the Armenian kingdom.[37] .Commander Corbulo responded and repelled most of the Parthian army that same year.^ Nero's reign was not without military operations (e.g., the campaigns of Corbulo against the Parthians, the suppression of the revolt of Boudicca in Britain), but his neglect of the armies was a critical error.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero sent an army under consul Caesennius Paetus, but in 62 he foolishly surrendered his forces to the Parthians at Rhandeia even though Corbulo was nearby.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[110] Tiridates retreated and Rome again controlled most of Armenia.[110]
Nero was acclaimed in public for this initial victory.[111] .Tigranes, a Cappadocian noble raised in Rome, was installed by Nero as the new ruler of Armenia.^ Caligula established the kingdoms of Lesser Armenia, Pontus, and part of Thrace for the three sons of Cotys he had been raised with at Rome.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Eight years later in 49 Seneca was recalled to Rome by the new empress Agrippina to tutor her son Nero; the next year he was appointed praetor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[112] .Corbulo was appointed governor of Syria as a reward.^ Corbulo was appointed governor of Syria.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[112]
The Parthian Empire c. 60. Nero's peace deal with Parthia was a political victory at home and made him beloved in the east.
In 62, Tigranes invaded the Parthian province of Adiabene.[113] .Again, Rome and Parthia were at war and this continued until 63. Parthia began building up for a strike against the Roman province of Syria.^ Garibaldi, his wife and some 4,700 men left Rome with the intent to fight a guerrilla war against Austria.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ BCE Rome completed its domination of the entire Italian peninsula and began its pursuit of a larger empire that resulted in a series of wars with other nations.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ When the soldiers refuse to strike the sacred trunks, Caesar himself takes up the ax until the soldiers fear him more than the gods.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[114] Corbulo tried to convince Nero to continue the war, but Nero opted for a peace deal instead.[115] .There was anxiety in Rome about eastern grain supplies and a budget deficit.^ In "On the Shortness of Life" Seneca addressed Paulinus, who was in charge of Rome's grain supply.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[116]
.The result was a deal where Tiridates again became the Armenian king, but was crowned in Rome by emperor Nero.^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (SFEC, 3/30/97, p.T7) 1133 Jun 4, In Rome Pope Innocentius II crowned German King Lothair II as emperor at the Church of the Lateran.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[117] .In the future, the king of Armenia was to be a Parthian prince, but his appointment required approval from the Romans.^ Paetus was dismissed, and Corbulo negotiated a treaty recognizing as king of Armenia the Parthian Tiridates.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Tiridates was forced to come to Rome and partake in ceremonies meant to display Roman dominance.[72][118]
This peace deal of 63 was a considerable victory for Nero politically.[119] Nero became very popular in the eastern provinces of Rome and with the Parthians as well.[119] The peace between Parthia and Rome lasted 50 years until emperor Trajan of Rome invaded Armenia in 114.

Other major power struggles and rebellions

Plaster bust of Nero, Pushkin Museum, Moscow.
.The war with Parthia was not Nero's only major war but he was both criticized and praised for an aversion to battle.^ I’m not praising Hitler, only pointing out that he got slandered, that Stalin really won the war and Hitler had some good ideas.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In a major battle the Romans led by Agricola killed about 10,000 Britons while losing only 360 men.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[120] .Like many emperors, Nero faced a number of rebellions and power struggles within the empire.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Struck 67-68 AD. Laureate head of Nero left / Nero stands facing within tetrastyle temple.
  • Nero, Roman Imperial Coinage of, Thumbnail Index - WildWinds.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.wildwinds.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

British Revolt of 60–61 (Boudica's Uprising)
In 60, a major rebellion broke out in the province of Britannia.[121] .While the governor Gaius Suetonius Paullinus and his troops were busy capturing the island of Mona (Anglesey) from the druids, the tribes of the south-east staged a revolt led by queen Boudica of the Iceni.^ In Babylon the great beauty of Callirhoe even captivates the great king; but Chaereas joins an Egyptian revolt against the Persian empire and captures her and the Persian queen.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In 59 Suetonius Paulinus attacked the hostile Druid center at Mona.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Mauretanian revolt was put down by forces led by Suetonius Paulinus in 41-42 and then by Hosidius Geta in 44, resulting in it becoming two provinces.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[122] .Boudica and her troops destroyed three cities before the army of Paullinus was able to return, be reinforced and put down the rebellion in 61.[123] Fearing Paullinus himself would provoke further rebellion, Nero replaced him with the more passive Publius Petronius Turpilianus.^ Nero expressed gratitude to his tutor and hoped for his continued counsel, fearing his retirement would make him seem mean.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero became more tyrannical, and Tigellinus was ordered to track down suspects.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The prefect reports the mob is put down; but Nero is not satisfied with the deaths of only the ringleaders.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[124]
The Pisonian Conspiracy of 65
.In 65, Gaius Calpurnius Piso, a Roman statesman, organized a conspiracy against Nero with the help of Subrius Flavus and Sulpicius Asper, a tribune and a centurion of the Praetorian Guard.^ Otho promised the praetorian guard the usual money and ordered a troop of cavalry to kill Galba and Piso.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ She got Burrus appointed commander of the praetorian guard, and two years later her son Nero was adopted by the Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero was supported by praetorian prefect Burrus and confirmed the guard by giving each man 15,000 sesterces.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[125] .According to Tacitus, many conspirators wished to "rescue the state" from the emperor and restore the Republic.^ While the Senate debated whether to restore the republic, the praetorian guard made Claudius Emperor, encouraged by his promise of 15,000 sesterces for each guard.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[126] The freedman Milichus discovered the conspiracy and reported it to Nero's secretary, Epaphroditos.[127] .As a result, the conspiracy failed and its members were executed including Lucan, the poet.^ After the conspiracy of the ambitious Nymphidius failed, Galba ordered his supporters executed without a hearing.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[128] .Nero's previous advisor, Seneca was ordered to commit suicide after admitting he discussed the plot with the conspirators.^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When his governor Petronius balked at this, he ordered him to commit suicide; but news of Caligula's death arrived before that message.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[129]
The First Jewish War of 66–70
In 66, there was a Jewish revolt in Judea stemming from Greek and Jewish religious tension.[130] In 67, Nero dispatched Vespasian to restore order.[131] .This revolt was eventually put down in 70, after Nero's death.^ The prefect reports the mob is put down; but Nero is not satisfied with the deaths of only the ringleaders.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca suggests clemency, but Nero prefers putting enemies down.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Mauretanian revolt was put down by forces led by Suetonius Paulinus in 41-42 and then by Hosidius Geta in 44, resulting in it becoming two provinces.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[132] .This revolt is famous for Romans breaching the walls of Jerusalem and destroying the Second Temple of Jerusalem.^ In three days the Roman army built a wall around Jerusalem to force them to surrender.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Factional fighting in Jerusalem between John's Zealots and Simon's army burned down all the buildings around the Temple and destroyed most of the stored grain.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Ancient Babylon Had destroyed God's Holy Temple and God's Holy City, Jerusalem; and killed, exiled and persecuted God's people for 70 years.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[133]

The Revolt of Vindex and Galba and the death of Nero

Marble bust of Nero, Antiquarium of the Palatine.
.In March 68, Gaius Julius Vindex, the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, rebelled against Nero's tax policies.^ Nevertheless the Emperor, preferring to perform rather than rule, went to Greek Naples, where he learned that Gaul's Lugdunensis (Lyons) governor Julius Vindex had raised 100,000 men in revolt.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero reduced taxes and gave slaves permission to file civil complaints against unjust masters.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[134][135] .Lucius Verginius Rufus, the governor of Germania Superior, was ordered to put down Vindex's rebellion.^ However, the German legate Verginius Rufus defeated Vindex at Vesontio (Besançon), and Vindex committed suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[136] .In an attempt to gain support from outside his own province, Vindex called upon Servius Sulpicius Galba, the governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, to join the rebellion and further, to declare himself emperor in opposition to Nero.^ Hispania Tarraconensis governor Servius Sulpicius Galba, having discovered Nero's secret orders for his assassination, changed his loyalty from Nero to the Senate and people of Rome and was supported by Lusitanian governor Otho and Baetica quaestor Caecina.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A new official called the iuridicus took over civilian jurisdiction from the governor in some of the larger provinces.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ News of Nero's death and his appointment by the Senate as Emperor reached Galba in Spain, which he had governed for eight years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[137] .At the Battle of Vesontio in May 68, Verginius' forces easily defeated those of Vindex and the latter committed suicide.^ However, the German legate Verginius Rufus defeated Vindex at Vesontio (Besançon), and Vindex committed suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero Caesar committed suicide with a sword wound to his head on June 9th, AD 68.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Apr 11, The forces of the Holy League were heavily defeated by the French at the Battle of Ravenna.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[136] However after putting down this one rebel, Verginius' legions attempted to proclaim their own commander as emperor. .Verginius refused to act against Nero, but the discontent of the legions of Germany and the continued opposition of Galba in Spain did not bode well for Nero.^ News of Nero's death and his appointment by the Senate as Emperor reached Galba in Spain, which he had governed for eight years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On the first day of 69 CE legions in Upper Germany led by Caecina refused to renew their oaths of loyalty to Galba.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.While Nero had retained some control of the situation, support for Galba increased despite his being officially declared a public enemy.^ The Senate declared Nero an enemy of Rome, and he was soon killed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.The prefect of the Praetorian Guard, Gaius Nymphidius Sabinus, also abandoned his allegiance to the emperor and came out in support for Galba.^ In Rome Tigellinus fled, and the other praetorian prefect Nymphidius Sabinus offered the guards 30,000 sesterces each to support the Senate and proclaim Galba Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Otho promised the praetorian guard the usual money and ordered a troop of cavalry to kill Galba and Piso.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ She got Burrus appointed commander of the praetorian guard, and two years later her son Nero was adopted by the Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.In response, Nero fled Rome with the intention of going to the port of Ostia and from there to take a fleet to one of the still-loyal eastern provinces.^ I used to go to Transsexual meetings 15 years ago in the Metropolitan Church on Mountain (I think it’ s still there).
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I’m never going to miss one of their shows (there’s one in Phoenix but I won’t be able to attend because of schedule conflict.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

However he abandoned the idea when some army officers openly refused to obey his commands, responding with a line from Vergil's Aeneid: "Is it so dreadful a thing then to die?" Nero then toyed with the idea of fleeing to Parthia, throwing himself upon the mercy of Galba, or to appeal to the people and beg them to pardon him for his past offences "and if he could not soften their hearts, to entreat them at least to allow him the prefecture of Egypt". Suetonius reports that the text of this speech was later found in Nero's writing desk, but that he dared not give it from fear of being torn to pieces before he could reach the Forum.[138]
.Nero returned to Rome and spent the evening in the palace.^ Nero did not return to Rome until 68 to find the city suffering a grain shortage.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He left Florence in 1534, hoping to return, but spent his last years in Rome.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

After sleeping, he awoke at about midnight to find the palace guard had left. Dispatching messages to his friends' palace chambers for them to come, none replied. Upon going to their chambers personally, all were abandoned. .Upon calling for a gladiator or anyone else adept with a sword to kill him, no one appeared.^ Yet he wrote that anyone who calls the whole world nice seems to see no difference between virtue and vice.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He provided such lavish gladiator shows that 5,000 beasts were killed in one day.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Lycus appears and wants to marry Megara; but as he killed her father, she hates him.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He cried "Have I neither friend nor foe?" and ran out as if to throw himself into the Tiber.[138]
.Returning again, Nero sought for some place where he could hide and collect his thoughts.^ You might of thought you could make some difference, but I suspect you are learning the opposite.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

An imperial freedman offered his villa, located 4 miles outside the city. Travelling in disguise, Nero and four loyal servants reached the villa, where Nero ordered them to dig a grave for him. .As it was being prepared, he said again and again "What an artist dies in me!".[139] At this time a courier arrived with a report that the Senate had declared Nero a public enemy and that it was their intention to execute him by beating him to death.^ The Senate declared Nero an enemy of Rome, and he was soon killed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Tacitus noted that some authorities reported efforts among the soldiers to have the armies declare an armistice and let the Senate choose an Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In 2007 forensic researchers said he died either from hitting his head on a rock when he passed out or because his attacker hit him in the head.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

At this news Nero prepared himself for suicide. Losing his nerve, he first begged for one of his companions to set an example by first killing himself. At last, the sound of approaching horsemen drove Nero to face the end. After quoting a line from Homer's Iliad ("Hark, now strikes on my ear the trampling of swift-footed coursers!") Nero drove a dagger into his throat. In this he was aided by his private secretary, Epaphroditos. .When one of the horsemen entered, upon his seeing Nero all but dead he attempted to stanch the bleeding.^ EVER implant an rfid chip in me is to put one in my dead corpse after ive exausted all of my ammo.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

With the words "Too late! .This is fidelity!", Nero died on 9 June 68.[140] This was the anniversary of the death of Octavia.^ Under her influence Nero ordered his mother Agrippina murdered in 59 and his wife Octavia three years later when Burrus died.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero Caesar lived from December 15th, AD 37 to June 9th AD 68.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero Caesar committed suicide with a sword wound to his head on June 9th, AD 68.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Nero was buried in the Mausoleum of the Domitii Ahenobarbi, in what is now the Villa Borghese (Pincian Hill) area of Rome.[140]
With his death, the Julio-Claudian dynasty came to an end. Chaos ensued in the Year of the Four Emperors.[85]

After death

.According to Suetonius and Cassius Dio, the people of Rome celebrated the death of Nero.^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The army of Vitellius defeated Otho's forces at Cremona, and according to Dio Cassius 40,000 men on each side were killed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet the historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius described his behavior as outdoing the many evils of Caligula.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[141][142] Tacitus, though, describes a more complicated political environment. .Tacitus mentions that Nero's death was welcomed by Senators, nobility and the upper class.^ News of Nero's death and his appointment by the Senate as Emperor reached Galba in Spain, which he had governed for eight years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[143] .The lower-class, slaves, frequenters of the arena and the theater, and "those who were supported by the famous excesses of Nero", on the other hand, were upset with the news.^ Seneca laughed at those who thought it degrading to eat with a slave but would fill their bellies and then vomit everything up.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca asks if this is just treatment; but Nero replies that justice is for those who have no need to fear.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[143] Members of the military were said to have mixed feelings, as they had allegiance to Nero, but were bribed to overthrow him.[144]
Eastern sources, namely Philostratus II and Apollonius of Tyana, mention that Nero's death was mourned as he "restored the liberties of Hellas with a wisdom and moderation quite alien to his character"[145] and that he "held our liberties in his hand and respected them."[146]
.Modern scholarship generally holds that, while the Senate and more well-off individuals welcomed Nero's death, the general populace was "loyal to the end and beyond, for Otho and Vitellius both thought it worthwhile to appeal to their nostalgia."^ The Senate welcomed Nero and heard his speech composed by Seneca in which he promised to follow the Augustan model, end secret trials, stop court corruption, and respect the privileges of the Senate.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ News of Nero's death and his appointment by the Senate as Emperor reached Galba in Spain, which he had governed for eight years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[147]
.Nero's name was erased from some monuments, in what Edward Champlin regards as "outburst of private zeal".[148] Many portraits of Nero were reworked to represent other figures; according to Eric R. Varner, over fifty such images survive.^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[149] This reworking of images is often explained as part of the way in which the memory of disgraced emperors was condemned posthumously (see damnatio memoriae).[149] .Champlin, however, doubts that the practice is necessarily negative and notes that some continued to create images of Nero long after his death.^ However, corporations and the United States government have been in favor of creating a gargantuan network of such scanners for some years now.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[150]
Apotheosis of Nero, c. after 68. Artwork portraying Nero rising to divine status after his death.
.The civil war during the Year of the Four Emperors was described by ancient historians as a troubling period.^ In the second book Lucan described the gory civil wars of Marius and Sulla .
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ During the civil wars citizenship was extended to many provincials - by Galba to tribes in central Gaul, by Otho to Lingones in eastern Gaul, and by Vitellius to those in Spain and Africa.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[85] .According to Tacitus, this instability was rooted in the fact that emperors could no longer rely on the perceived legitimacy of the imperial bloodline, as Nero and those before him could.^ Since Seneca criticized Nero's amusements in charioteering and singing, they argued the Emperor no longer needed a tutor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In those days no one could acquire much influence without some eloquence.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ No longer could one have the privilege of attacking the most influential men such as Scipio, Sulla , and Pompey .
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[143] .Galba began his short reign with the execution of many allies of Nero and possible future enemies.^ Nero's freedmen and political advisors were executed except for Tigellinus, whose enemies Galba chose not to reward.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[151] .One notable enemy included Nymphidius Sabinus, who claimed to be the son of emperor Caligula.^ In Rome Tigellinus fled, and the other praetorian prefect Nymphidius Sabinus offered the guards 30,000 sesterces each to support the Senate and proclaim Galba Emperor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ One alleged eyewitness (slanderer) claims those who removed the corpses from the gas chamber while smoking and eating: you can’t smoke and eat while wearing a gas mask.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was succeeded by his son Titus, who was captain of the guards and had already been assisting him as secretary and reading the Emperor's speeches in the Senate.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[152]
Otho overthrew Galba. .Otho was said to be liked by many soldiers because he had been a friend of Nero's and resembled him somewhat in temperament.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Although Musonius of Babylon was arrested in Rome because Nero suspected him of using magic, Apollonius went to Rome anyway.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Otho was hated as a friend of Nero and because he showed that imperial power could be bought from soldiers willing to kill a Caesar.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[153] It was said that the common Roman hailed Otho as Nero himself.[154] .Otho used "Nero" as a surname and reerected many statues to Nero.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[154] Vitellius overthrew Otho. Vitellius began his reign with a large funeral for Nero complete with songs written by Nero.[155]
.After Nero's suicide in 68, there was a widespread belief, especially in the eastern provinces, that he was not dead and somehow would return.^ Nero did not return to Rome until 68 to find the city suffering a grain shortage.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero Caesar committed suicide with a sword wound to his head on June 9th, AD 68.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[156] This belief came to be known as the Nero Redivivus Legend.
.The legend of Nero's return lasted for hundreds of years after Nero's death.^ Before his death the next year the novelist Petronius wrote out a list of Nero's male and female bed partners.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ During the last three years of his life Seneca could concentrate on philosophy and wrote more than a hundred letters to Lucilius, the procurator in Sicily.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He left Florence in 1534, hoping to return, but spent his last years in Rome.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Augustine of Hippo wrote of the legend as a popular belief in 422[157]
At least three Nero imposters emerged leading rebellions. .The first, who sang and played the cithara or lyre and whose face was similar to that of the dead emperor, appeared in 69 during the reign of Vitellius.^ No sexual abuse except lust after my two sisters (who don’t remember or forgive me) and my first boy friend, who is probably dead.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I live with a woman whose family was destroyed by the Khmer Rouge: more than 20 of her relatives died during Pol Pot’s reign.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[158] After persuading some to recognize him, he was captured and executed.[158] .Sometime during the reign of Titus (79-81) there was another impostor who appeared in Asia and also sang to the accompaniment of the lyre and looked like Nero but he, too, was killed.^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It sounds like you’re the kind of irrational, obstinate, emotional person who would kill me because of my beliefs.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Titus Caesar was the oldest son of Vespasian Caesar who was Caesar from Dec AD 69 to AD 79; and therefore heir and Crown *PRINCE* to the throne in Rome and was Caesar from AD 79 to AD 81.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[159] .Twenty years after Nero's death, during the reign of Domitian, there was a third pretender.^ Before his death the next year the novelist Petronius wrote out a list of Nero's male and female bed partners.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So Domitian, after having put to death one group of envoys, made a treaty with Decebalus, who accepted vassal status the next year.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There were lesser outbreaks in many cities for the next twenty years.
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.Supported by the Parthians, they hardly could be persuaded to give him up[160] and the matter almost came to war.^ Seneca's skill as an orator almost led the envious Caligula to have him killed; but the Emperor was persuaded the sickly intellectual would die soon.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Their Arab neighbors could care less about them other than they give them reason to behave as they do.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And the only reason they could hold the world hostage is because we are too spoiled and greedy to give up gas powered vehicles.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[85]

Historiography

.The history of Nero’s reign is problematic in that no historical sources survived that were contemporary with Nero.^ Unfortunately, no Etruscan literary works survive, so most documentation comes from Greek and Roman literary sources as well as archaeological evidence.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.These first histories at one time did exist and were described as biased and fantastical, either overly critical or praising of Nero.^ That was the first time since I was a kid I did that!
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Oh one thing that Jesus came here to save you from the sins, because he loves you because if he did not we would never exist.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The frankness of Petronius is not for all tastes, but he did describe the decadence in Rome during the era of Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[161] The original sources were also said to contradict on a number of events.[162] .Nonetheless, these lost primary sources were the basis of surviving secondary and tertiary histories on Nero written by the next generations of historians.^ Philostratus used the letters of Apollonius, some of which survive, but his main source was the now lost memoirs by Damis of Nineveh, a devoted companion of Apollonius.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[163] A few of the contemporary historians are known by name. Fabius Rusticus, Cluvius Rufus and Pliny the Elder all wrote condemning histories on Nero that are now lost.[164] There were also pro-Nero histories, but it is unknown who wrote them or on what deeds Nero was praised.[165]
.The bulk of what is known of Nero comes from Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio, who were all of the Patrician class.^ Yet the historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius described his behavior as outdoing the many evils of Caligula.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ {See Acts 12:1-5,19-23} **{#4}** Nero Caesar who will come again as the 8th KING who will be the anti-christ of the End-Times.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Tacitus and Suetonius wrote their histories on Nero over fifty years after his death, while Cassius Dio wrote his history over 150 years after Nero’s death.^ Vitellius ordered astrologers to leave Italy by a specified day; Dio Cassius wrote that astrologers commanded him to depart life on the day on which he was killed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Before his death the next year the novelist Petronius wrote out a list of Nero's male and female bed partners.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.These sources contradict on a number of events in Nero’s life including the death of Claudius, the death of Agrippina and the Roman fire of 64, but they are consistent in their condemnation of Nero.^ Mark.” Apparently some Christians including Peter were inspired to call ROME “BABYLON” after Nero’s terrible persecution of Christians in AD 64.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Mark.” Apparently some Christians including Peter were inspired to call ROME “BABYLON” after Nero’s terrible persecution of Christians starting in AD 64.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Agrippina's ghost comes to complain of this marriage and prophesies a death will punish the crimes of her tyrannical son Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

A handful of other sources also add a limited and varying perspective on Nero. Few surviving sources paint Nero in a favorable light. .Some sources, though, portray him as a competent emperor who was popular with the Roman people, especially in the east.^ Many fled Jerusalem, though some were killed by Zealots out of fear they would join the Romans.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Like some of the Julian Emperors, lack of funds made Domitian greedy, and fear of assassination made him cruel.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of his followers refused to go; he did not consider them cowards, though he hailed as philosophers those who rose above such fears.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]
Cassius Dio
.Cassius Dio (c. 155- 229) was the son of Cassius Apronianus, a Roman senator.^ Dio Cassius, Roman History 62: 18 tr.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Roman Senate met to invest Flavius Vespasian as Emperor, making his son Domitian Caesar.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He passed the greater part of his life in public service. .He was a senator under Commodus and governor of Smyrna after the death of Septimius Severus; and afterwards suffect consul around 205, as also proconsul in Africa and Pannonia.^ The work was requested by Empress Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, but it was not completed until after her death in 217.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Books 61–63 of Dio's Roman History describe the reign of Nero.^ Dio Cassius, Roman History 62: 18 tr.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ History tells us that the second huge Roman persecution of Christians {The first was NERO'S PERSECUTION OF AD 64-68} occurred in the last year of the reign of Domitian Caesar which would have been from September AD 95 to September AD 96.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Only fragments of these books remain and what does remain was abridged and altered by John Xiphilinus, an 11th century monk.^ Only in the last book does a humanitarian spirit arise as the women nonviolently insist on mutual respect.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Only fragments from two books of The Satyricon by Petronius remain; but they give a flavor of his hedonistic life artfully portrayed in a novel.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Dio Chrysostom
.Dio Chrysostom (c. 40– 120), a Greek philosopher and historian, wrote the Roman people were very happy with Nero and would have allowed him to rule indefinitely.^ Nero expressed gratitude to his tutor and hoped for his continued counsel, fearing his retirement would make him seem mean.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ BCE The Romans overthrew King Lucius Tarquinius and established a republic with rule by the senate and the people of Rome (SPQR - Senatus Populusque Romanus).
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^ Josephus managed to hide and surrendered when Vespasian sent to him a friend, the historian giving himself a philosophical speech on why suicide is a bad idea.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

They longed for his rule once he was gone and embraced imposters when they appeared:
.Indeed the truth about this has not come out even yet; for so far as the rest of his subjects were concerned, there was nothing to prevent his continuing to be Emperor for all time, seeing that even now everybody wishes he were still alive.^ Revelation 17:8: The beast, which you saw, once was {alive}, Now {in AD 96} is not {alive} and will come up out of the Abyss and go to his destruction.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ New York Times there was an article about MANY rich people from the Netherlands leaving to Australia, New Zealand and Canada because they don’t like all the Moslem immigrants, who bring crime.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Revelation 17:8b: "Those whose names have not been written in the Book of Life will be astonished when they see the beast {666}, because he once was {Alive--AD 37-68} now in AD 96 is not {Alive}, and yet will come."
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.And the great majority do believe that he still is, although in a certain sense he has died not once but often along with those who had been firmly convinced that he was still alive.^ Seeing the Colossus at Rhodes, Apollonius still believed that a person who loves wisdom in a sound and innocent spirit is much greater.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the featured groups I’m interviewing are those who have been run through the penal system (including those who are still in it.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Otherwise you will have trouble convincing the reader that America is the Great Satan as is what you stated I do believe.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[166]
Epictetus
Epictetus (c. 55- 135) was the slave to Nero's scribe Epaphroditos. .He makes a few passing negative comments on Nero's character in his work, but makes no remarks on the nature of his rule.^ But Nero learned even more and it makes flawless copies of retail movies and I can make em from scratch with no effort or time investment.
  • Nero - Video software and downloads - VideoHelp.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.videohelp.com [Source type: General]

^ Games reveal character in a natural way, and no child is too young to distinguish between right and wrong.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He describes Nero as a spoiled, angry and unhappy man.
Josephus
The historian Josephus (c. 37-100) accused other historians of slandering Nero.
.The historian Josephus (c. 37- 100), while calling Nero a tyrant, was also the first to mention bias against Nero.^ The Sanhedrin appointed as governor of Galilee the historian Flavius Josephus, who was born in Jerusalem in 38 and in 64 had gained the friendship of Nero's wife Poppaea in Rome.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Of other historians, he said:
.But I omit any further discourse about these affairs; for there have been a great many who have composed the history of Nero; some of which have departed from the truth of facts out of favor, as having received benefits from him; while others, out of hatred to him, and the great ill-will which they bare him, have so impudently raved against him with their lies, that they justly deserve to be condemned.^ And There was a movie I recently watched (and kind of liked) about a woman who falls in love with someone in Rio—must have seen it on an airplane because I don’t see very many movies.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ According to Dio Cassius many were put to death, while many others purchased their lives from Tigellinus for a great price.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ New York Times there was an article about MANY rich people from the Netherlands leaving to Australia, New Zealand and Canada because they don’t like all the Moslem immigrants, who bring crime.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.Nor do I wonder at such as have told lies of Nero, since they have not in their writings preserved the truth of history as to those facts that were earlier than his time, even when the actors could have no way incurred their hatred, since those writers lived a long time after them.^ As for mescaline: even though I live less than 100 miles from the Peyote Church, I have not ventured to go.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no evidence they were performed, but they easily could have been.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There was no way I could let her get away with it because everyone was watching.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[167]
Lucan
.Though more of a poet than historian, Lucanus (c. 39- 65) has one of the kindest accounts of Nero's rule.^ Titus stopped accusers from prosecuting anyone by more than one law for the same offense.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is absurd to believe that one's financial balance is more important than mental balance.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He writes of peace and prosperity under Nero in contrast to previous war and strife. .Ironically, he was later involved in a conspiracy to overthrow Nero and was executed.^ His rule was marked by nepotism and he was involved in a conspiracy to overthrow the Medici in Florence.
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^ The next year he joined the conspiracy of Calpurnius to overthrow Nero and was forced to commit suicide at age 25 along with his father and his uncles Seneca and Gallio.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[168]
Philostratus
.Philostratus II "the Athenian" (c. 172- 250) spoke of Nero in the Life of Apollonius Tyana (Books 4–5).^ Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 1:17 tr.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The main source for the life of Apollonius of Tyana is the biography by Philostratus.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Philostratus described how his spirit announced he was the Egyptian god Proteus before his birth and that Apollonius was born in a meadow of flowers surrounded by swans in Tyana of Cappadocia.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Though he has a generally a bad or dim view of Nero, he speaks of others' positive reception of Nero in the East.
Pliny the Elder
.The history of Nero by Pliny the Elder (c. 24- 79) did not survive.^ AD Aug 24, Pliny the Elder, Roman naturalist, witnessed the eruption of long-dormant Mount Vesuvius and was overcome by the fumes as he tried to rescue refugees.
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Still, there are several references to Nero in Pliny's Natural Histories. Pliny has one of the worst opinions of Nero and calls him an "enemy of mankind."[169]
Plutarch
Plutarch (c. 46- 127) mentions Nero indirectly in his account of the Life of Galba and the Life of Otho. Nero is portrayed as a tyrant, but those that replace him are not described as better.
Seneca the Younger
.It is not surprising that Seneca (c. 4 BC- 65), Nero's teacher and advisor, writes very well of Nero.^ When Nero became Emperor, Seneca served as his chief advisor for civilian affairs.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When the military advisor Burrus died in 62, apparently unable to control Nero's crimes, Seneca decided to request retirement.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[170]
Suetonius
Suetonius (c. 69- 130) was a member of the equestrian order, and he was the head of the department of the imperial correspondence. While in this position, Suetonius started writing biographies of the emperors, accentuating the anecdotal and sensational aspects.
Tacitus
.The Annals by Tacitus (c. 56- 117) is the most detailed and comprehensive history on the rule of Nero, despite being incomplete after the year 66. Tacitus described the rule of the Julio-Claudian emperors as generally unjust.^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He also thought that existing writing on them was unbalanced:
.The histories of Tiberius, Caius, Claudius, and Nero, while they were in power, were falsified through terror, and after their death were written under the irritation of a recent hatred.^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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^ THEY {Nero Caesar and the False Prophet} were given power over a fourth of the earth to kill by sword, famine and plague, and by the wild beasts of the earth.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Her mother was put to death by her father Claudius, who was poisoned by Agrippina (her stepmother and mother-in-law since she married her step-brother Nero).
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[171]
.Tacitus was the son of a procurator, who married into the elite family of Agricola.^ Galileo had 2 daughters consigned to a nunnery and one son, whom he got married into a rich Florentine family.
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.He entered his political life as a senator after Nero's death and, by Tacitus' own admission, owed much to Nero's rivals.^ News of Nero's death and his appointment by the Senate as Emperor reached Galba in Spain, which he had governed for eight years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Realizing that this bias may be apparent to others, Tacitus protests that his writing is true.[172]

Nero and religion

Jewish tradition

.At the end of 66, conflict broke out between Greeks and Jews in Jerusalem and Caesarea.^ BCE War broke out between Carthage and Rome.
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^ Greeks were fighting Jews over who would control Caesarea; eventually the Greeks bribed Burrus to have Nero deprive the Judeans of civil rights.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Dacian war led by Decebalus in Moesia broke out in 85 and was not ended until 88 when two legions at Moguntiacum led by Antonius Saturninus also revolted.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

According to a Jewish tradition in the Talmud (tractate Gitin 56a-b), Nero went to Jerusalem and shot arrows in all four directions. .All the arrows landed in the city.^ At this time all of my land is not in the city limits.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

He then asked a passing child to repeat the verse he had learned that day. The child responded "I will lay my vengeance upon Edom by the hand of my people Israel" (Ez. 25,14). .Nero became terrified, believing that God wanted the Temple in Jerusalem to be destroyed, but would punish the one to carry it out.^ Factional fighting in Jerusalem between John's Zealots and Simon's army burned down all the buildings around the Temple and destroyed most of the stored grain.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jupiter announces to the gods he will destroy Thebes and punish Argos too.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I suppose if the Catholic Church wanted to take care of them Hitler would have let them but maybe no one wanted them and they were a burden to the state.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

Nero said, "He desires to lay waste His House and to lay the blame on me," whereupon he fled and converted to Judaism to avoid such retribution. Vespasian was then dispatched to put down the rebellion. .The Talmud adds that the sage Reb Meir Baal HaNess, a prominent supporter of the Bar Kokhba rebellion against Roman rule, was a descendant of Nero.^ Rebellion against Roman legions had only brought more legions.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

Roman sources nowhere report Nero's alleged conversion to Judaism, a religion considered by the Romans as extremely barbaric and immoral.[173]

Christian tradition

A Christian Dirce, by Henryk Siemiradzki. A Christian woman is martyred in this re-enactment of the myth of Dirce.
.Early Christian tradition often holds Nero as the first persecutor of Christians and as the killer of Apostles Peter and Paul.^ Some Christians believed that Nero was the anti-Christ as the first major persecutor of their faith.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.There was also a belief among some early Christians that Nero was the Antichrist.^ Some Christians believed that Nero was the anti-Christ as the first major persecutor of their faith.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]
First Persecutor
.The non-Christian historian Tacitus describes Nero extensively torturing and executing Christians after the fire of 64.[83] Suetonius also mentions Nero punishing Christians, though he does so as a praise and does not connect it with the fire.^ Yet the historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius described his behavior as outdoing the many evils of Caligula.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Sanhedrin appointed as governor of Galilee the historian Flavius Josephus, who was born in Jerusalem in 38 and in 64 had gained the friendship of Nero's wife Poppaea in Rome.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ According to the historian Suetonius, who described in detail many crimes of Nero, the poetic Emperor felt so guilty that he believed the Furies were pursuing him with whips and torches.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[174]
.The Christian writer Tertullian (c. 155- 230) was the first to call Nero the first persecutor of Christians.^ Some Christians believed that Nero was the anti-Christ as the first major persecutor of their faith.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He wrote "Examine your records. There you will find that Nero was the first that persecuted this doctrine".[175] Lactantius (c. 240- 320) also said Nero "first persecuted the servants of God".[176] as does Sulpicius Severus.[177] .However, Suetonius gives that "since the Jews constantly made disturbances at the instigation of Chrestus, he [the emperor Claudius] expelled them from Rome" ("Iudaeos impulsore Chresto assidue tumultuantis Roma expulit").^ Jewish worship was tolerated in the empire, though some may have been expelled from Rome in 49; Suetonius wrote that Jews caused disturbances in Rome that were instigated by Chrestus, by which he probably meant the Christ.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar Drusus, the nephew of Tiberius and grandson of the wife of Augustus, was made emperor after Caligula.
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^ While the Senate debated whether to restore the republic, the praetorian guard made Claudius Emperor, encouraged by his promise of 15,000 sesterces for each guard.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[178] .These expelled "Jews" may have been early Christians, although Suetonius is not explicit.^ Jewish worship was tolerated in the empire, though some may have been expelled from Rome in 49; Suetonius wrote that Jews caused disturbances in Rome that were instigated by Chrestus, by which he probably meant the Christ.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Nor is the Bible explicit, calling Aquila of Pontus and his wife, Priscilla, both expelled from Italy at the time, "Jews."^ (SFC, 1/9/98, p.D7) 1598 Jan 8, Genoa, Italy, expelled its Jews.
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[179]
Killer of Peter and Paul
.The first text to suggest that Nero killed an apostle is the apocryphal Ascension of Isaiah, a Christian writing from the 2nd century.^ When Emperor Nero was eighteen, he signed his first death warrant, commenting that he wished he had never learned to write.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some Christians believed that Nero was the anti-Christ as the first major persecutor of their faith.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ After the brilliant writing of Virgil , Horace , and Ovid in the Augustan era, the literature in the later first century reflected the increasing decadence of the imperial culture.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

It says the slayer of his mother, who himself this king, will persecute the plant which the Twelve Apostles of the Beloved have planted. Of the Twelve one will be delivered into his hands.[180]
.The Bishop Eusebius of Caesarea (c. 275- 339) was the first to write that Paul was beheaded in Rome during the reign of Nero.^ When Emperor Nero was eighteen, he signed his first death warrant, commenting that he wished he had never learned to write.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The frankness of Petronius is not for all tastes, but he did describe the decadence in Rome during the era of Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca commended the early reign of the young Nero during which he could boast of not shedding blood anywhere in the world.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[181] He states that Nero's persecution led to Peter and Paul's deaths, but that Nero did not give any specific orders. .Several other accounts have Paul surviving his two years in Rome and traveling to Hispania.^ As long as Jews were killing each other in Jerusalem, Vespasian refrained from attacking it for two years, allowing his troops to squelch resistance in Peraea and Idumaea.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Then 960 people killed each other in a suicide pact; only two women and five children survived.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Although his two brothers and mother were killed, Caligula managed to survive by joining in the perversions of the Emperor at Capri for six years.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[182]
.Peter is first said to have been crucified upside down in Rome during Nero's reign (but not by Nero) in the apocryphal Acts of Peter (c. 200).^ The frankness of Petronius is not for all tastes, but he did describe the decadence in Rome during the era of Nero.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca commended the early reign of the young Nero during which he could boast of not shedding blood anywhere in the world.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

[183] The account ends with Paul still alive and Nero abiding by God's command not to persecute any more Christians.
By the 4th century, a number of writers were stating that Nero killed Peter and Paul.[184]
The Antichrist
The Ascension of Isaiah is the first text to suggest that Nero was the Antichrist. It claims a lawless king, the slayer of his mother,...will come and there will come with him all the powers of this world, and they will hearken unto him in all that he desires.[180]
The Sibylline Oracles, Book 5 and 8, written in the 2nd century, speaks of Nero returning and bringing destruction.[185] .Within Christian communities, these writings, along with others,[186] fueled the belief that Nero would return as the Antichrist.^ It was warned biblically that these people would never get along with their Jewish neighbors.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.In 310, Lactantius wrote that Nero suddenly disappeared, and even the burial-place of that noxious wild beast was nowhere to be seen.^ Later Apollonius wrote to Vespasian criticizing him for seriously enslaving the Greeks when even Nero playfully had respected their liberties.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.This has led some persons of extravagant imagination to suppose that, having been conveyed to a distant region, he is still reserved alive; and to him they apply the Sibylline verses
.^ If Pol Pot was so bad, why do they honor his wife, why did his wife honor him, why are people honoring his grave, why are Pol Pot’s henchmen still living in the communities?!
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

[176]
In 422, Augustine of Hippo wrote about 2 Thessalonians 2:1–11, where he believed Paul mentioned the coming of the Antichrist. .Though he rejects the theory, Augustine mentions that many Christians believed that Nero was the Antichrist or would return as the Antichrist.^ Spectacles of Christians being thrown to dogs (or lions) or used as burning torches aroused sympathy from many people and increased Nero's unpopularity.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca delighted in quoting Epicurus in many letters, though he believed the Stoic sages feel their troubles but overcome them, while the Epicureans do not even feel them.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some Christians believed that Nero was the anti-Christ as the first major persecutor of their faith.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

He wrote, so that in saying, "For the mystery of iniquity doth already work,"[187] he alluded to Nero, whose deeds already seemed to be as the deeds of Antichrist.[157]
Most scholars,[188][189] such as Delbert Hillers (Johns Hopkins University) of the American Schools of Oriental Research and the editors of the Oxford & Harper Collins study Bibles, contend that the number 666 in the Book of Revelation is a code for Nero,[190] a view that is also supported in Roman Catholic Biblical commentaries.[191][192] When treated as Hebrew numbers, the letters of Nero's name add up either to 616 or 666, representing the two devil numbers given in ancient versions of Revelation and the two ways of spelling his name in Hebrew (Nero vs. Neron Caesar). נ ר ו ן ק ס ר : Nun=50 + Resh=200 + Waw=6 (+ Nun=50) + Qof=100 + Samekh=60 + Resh=200 = 666 (616).[193]
The concept of Nero as the Antichrist is often a central belief of Preterist eschatology.

Ancestry

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Porcia Catonis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Aemilia Lepida
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Marcus Antonius Creticus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Mark Antony
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Julia Antonia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Antonia Major
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Gaius Octavius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Octavia Minor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Atia Balba Caesonia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1.Nero
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. Tiberius Claudius Nero
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Nero Claudius Drusus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Livia Drusilla
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Germanicus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. = 10. Mark Antony
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Antonia Minor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. = 11. Octavia Minor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Agrippina the Younger
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Agrippina the Elder
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Augustus (brother of 11, 27)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Julia the Elder
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Scribonia
 
 
 
 
 
 

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Nero's birth day is listed in Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 6. His death day is uncertain, though, perhaps because Galba was declared emperor before Nero lived. A June 9th death day comes from Jerome, Chronicle, which lists Nero's rule as 13 years, 7 months and 28 days. Cassius Dio, Roman History LXII.3 and Josephus, War of the Jews IV, say Nero's rule was 13 years, 8 months which would be June 11th.
  2. ^ Suetonius states that Nero committed suicide in Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 49; Sulpicius Severus, who possibly used Tacitus' lost fragments as a source, reports that is was uncertain whether Nero committed suicide, Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.29, also see T.D. Barnes, "The Fragments of Tacitus' Histories", Classical Philology (1977), p. 228.
  3. ^ Galba criticized Nero's luxuria, both his public and private excessive spending, during rebellion, Tacitus, Annals I.16; Kragelund, Patrick, "Nero's Luxuria, in Tacitus and in the Octavia", The Classical Quarterly, 2000, pp. 494–515.
  4. ^ References to Nero's matricide appear in the Sibylline Oracles 5.490–520, Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales The Monk's Tale, and William Shakespeare's Hamlet 3.ii.
  5. ^ Nero was not a fiddle player, but a lyre player. Suetonius states Nero played the lyre while Rome burned, see Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 38; For a detailed explanation of this transition see M.F. Gyles "Nero Fiddled while Rome Burned", The Classical Journal (1948), pp. 211-217 [1].
  6. ^ These include Lucan's Civil War, Seneca the Younger's On Mercy and Dio Chrysostom's Discourses along with various Roman coins and inscriptions.
  7. ^ Tacitus, Histories I.4, I.5, I.13, II.8; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 57, Life of Otho 7, Life of Vitellius 11; Philostratus II, The Life of Apollonius 5.41; Dio Chrysostom, Discourse XXI, On Beauty.
  8. ^ On fire and Christian persecution, see F.W. Clayton, "Tacitus and Christian Persecution", The Classical Quarterly, pp. 81-85; B.W. Henderson, Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero, p. 437; On general bias against Nero, see Edward Champlin, Nero, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003, pp. 36-52 (ISBN 0-674-01192-9).
  9. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 1.
  10. ^ a b c Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 6.
  11. ^ a b c d Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 5.
  12. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XII.66; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.34; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 44; Josephus is less sure, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XX.8.1.
  13. ^ "Suetonius • Life of Nero". http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Suetonius/12Caesars/Nero*.html#51. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  14. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Caligula 29.
  15. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XIX.1.14, XIX.2.4.
  16. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XIX.3.2.
  17. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 26.
  18. ^ a b c Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 27.
  19. ^ Tacitus, Annals XII.25.
  20. ^ Tacitus, Annals XII.26.
  21. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XII.41.
  22. ^ Tacitus, Annals XII.58.
  23. ^ Cassius Dio's and Suetonius' accounts claim Nero knew of the murder, Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.35, Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 33; Tacitus' and Josephus' accounts only mention Agrippina, Tacitus, Annals XII.65, Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XX.8.1.
  24. ^ Augustus was 35, Tiberius was 56, Caligula was 25 and Cladius was 50.
  25. ^ Cassius Dio claims "At first Agrippina managed for him all the business of the empire", then Seneca and Burrus "took the rule entirely into their own hands,", but "after the death of Britannicus, Seneca and Burrus no longer gave any careful attention to the public business" in 55, Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.3-7.
  26. ^ Jowett, Benjamin (1867). "Alexander of Aegae". in William Smith. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. pp. 110–111. http://www.ancientlibrary.com/smith-bio/0119.html. 
  27. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.5.
  28. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.13.
  29. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.12.
  30. ^ a b c d e Tacitus, Annals XIII.14.
  31. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.16.
  32. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.16; Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, XX.8.2; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 33; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.7.
  33. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.18-21.
  34. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.23.
  35. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.10.
  36. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.7.
  37. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.46.
  38. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.1.
  39. ^ Dawson, Alexis, "Whatever Happened to Lady Agrippina?", The Classical Journal, 1969, p. 254.
  40. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Otho 3.
  41. ^ Rogers, Robert, Heirs and Rivals to Nero, Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association, Vol. 86. (1955), p. 202. Silana accuses Agrippina of plotting to bring up Plautus in 55, Tacitus, Annals XIII.19; Silana is recalled from exile after Agrippina's power waned, Tacitus, Annals XIV.12; Plautus is exiled in 60, Tacitus, Annals XIV.22.
  42. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 34.
  43. ^ Tacitus, "The Annals".
  44. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.51.
  45. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.52.
  46. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.53.
  47. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIV.60.
  48. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.64.
  49. ^ Farquhar, Michael (2001). A Treasure of Royal Scandals, p.216. Penguin Books, New York. ISBN 0739420259.
  50. ^ Rudich, Vasily, Political Dissidence Under Nero, p. 134.
  51. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.48.
  52. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.49.
  53. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.65.
  54. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 37.
  55. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.4.
  56. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.51.
  57. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 53; Gibbon, Edward, The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Vol. I, Chap. VI.
  58. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.25.
  59. ^ Aurelius Victor mentions Trajan's praise of Nero's first five or so years. Aurelius Victor The Style of Life and the Manners of the Imperitors 5; The unknown author of Epitome de Caesaribus also mentions Trajan's praise of the first five or so years of Nero Auctor incertus Epitome De Caesarbius 5.
  60. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.28.
  61. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 17.
  62. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.26.
  63. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.27.
  64. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.45.
  65. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.31.
  66. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.30, XIV.18, XIV.40, XIV.46.
  67. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.50.
  68. ^ a b c Tacitus, Annals XIII.51.
  69. ^ a b c Tacitus, Annals XIV.20.
  70. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 12.
  71. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIV.21.
  72. ^ a b c d e Tacitus, Annals XV.38.
  73. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XV.43.
  74. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XV.42.
  75. ^ Josephus, War of the Jews III.10.10,Werner, Walter: "The largest ship trackway in ancient times: the Diolkos of the Isthmus of Corinth, Greece, and early attempts to build a canal", The International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, Vol. 26, No. 2 (1997), pp. 98–119.
  76. ^ Tacitus, Annals XVI.3.
  77. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 31.
  78. ^ Tacitus, Annals wikisource:The Annals (Tacitus)/Book 15#45 XV.45.
  79. ^ Thornton, Mary Elizabeth Kelly "Nero's New Deal," Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association, Vol. 102, (1971), p. 629.
  80. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XV.40; Suetonius says the fire raged for six days and seven nights, Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 38; A pillar set by Domitius states the fire burned for nine days.
  81. ^ Pliny the Elder, Natural Histories, XVII.1.5, Pliny mentions trees that lasted "down to the Emperor Nero’s conflagration".
  82. ^ Suetonius, Life of Nero 38; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXII.16.
  83. ^ a b c d e Tacitus Annals XV.44.
  84. ^ Juvenal writes that Rome suffered from perpetual fires and falling houses Juvenal, Satires 3.7, 3.195, 3.214.
  85. ^ a b c d Tacitus, Histories I.2.
  86. ^ Suetonius, Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Titus 8.
  87. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero, 38; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXII.16.
  88. ^ a b c d Tacitus, Annals XV.39.
  89. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning, First, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 227-8. ISBN 0-06-430158-3.
  90. ^ Ball, Larry F. (2003). The Domus Aurea and the Roman architectural revolution. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521822513.
  91. ^ Warden reduces its size to under 100 acres (0.40 km2). Warden, P.G., "The Domus Aurea Reconsidered," Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 40 (1981) pp. 271-278.
  92. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.45.
  93. ^ In the earliest extant manuscript, the second Medicean, the e in "Chrestianos", Chrestians, has been changed into an i; cf. Gerd Theißen, Annette Merz, Der historische Jesus: ein Lehrbuch, 2001, p. 89. The reading Christianos, Christians, is therefor doubtful.
  94. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.14, XIV.16.
  95. ^ Philostratus II, Life of Apollonius 4.39; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Vitellius 11.
  96. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XV.33.
  97. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars Life of Nero 21.
  98. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 33.
  99. ^ Tacitus, Annals XVI.4; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Vitellius 11; Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 10, 21.
  100. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.15; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXI.19.
  101. ^ Philostratus II, Life of Apollonius 5.7.
  102. ^ a b c Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 24.
  103. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 25.
  104. ^ Suetonius The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 23, 24.
  105. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.7.
  106. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.8.
  107. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.9.
  108. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.10.
  109. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.42.
  110. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIII.55.
  111. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.56.
  112. ^ a b Tacitus, Annals XIV.36.
  113. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.1.
  114. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.4.
  115. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.16.
  116. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.18.
  117. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.29.
  118. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXIII.2.
  119. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LXII.23.
  120. ^ Suetonius Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 18; Marcus Annaeus Lucanus Pharsalia (Civil War) (c. 65)[2].
  121. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.29.
  122. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.31.
  123. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.31-38.
  124. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIV.39.
  125. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.49.
  126. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.50.
  127. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.55.
  128. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.70.
  129. ^ Tacitus, Annals XV.60-62.
  130. ^ Josephus, War of the Jews II.13.7.
  131. ^ Josephus, War of the Jews III.1.3.
  132. ^ Josephus, War of the Jews VI.10.1.
  133. ^ Josephus, War of the Jews VII.1.1.
  134. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXIII.22.
  135. ^ Donahue.
  136. ^ a b Cassius Dio, Roman History LXIII.24.
  137. ^ Plutarch, The Parallel Lives, Life of Galba 5.
  138. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 47.
  139. ^ Suetonius, Nero, xlix) [3].
  140. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 49.
  141. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History 63.
  142. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 57.
  143. ^ a b c Tacitus, Histories I.4.
  144. ^ Tacitus, Histories I.5.
  145. ^ Philostratus II, The Life of Apollonius 5.41.
  146. ^ Letter from Apollonius to Emperor Vespasian, Philostratus II, The Life of Apollonius 5.41.
  147. ^ M. T. Griffin, Nero (1984), p. 186; Gibbon, Edward, The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Vol. I, Chap. III.
  148. ^ Champlin (2003), p. 29.
  149. ^ a b John Pollini, Review of Mutilation and Transformation: Damnatio Memoriae and Roman Imperial Portraiture by Eric R. Varner, The Art Bulletin (September 2006).
  150. ^ Champlin (2003), pp. 29–31.
  151. ^ Tacitus, Histories I.6.
  152. ^ Plutarch, The Parallel Lives, The Life of Galba 9.
  153. ^ Tacitus, Histories I.13.
  154. ^ a b Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Otho 7.
  155. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Vitellius 11.
  156. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 57; Tacitus, Histories II.8; Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.19.
  157. ^ a b Augustine of Hippo, City of God .XX.19.3.
  158. ^ a b Tacitus, Histories II.8.
  159. ^ Cassius Dio, Roman History LXVI.19.
  160. ^ Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caears, Life of Nero 57.
  161. ^ Tacitus, Annals I.1; Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XX.8.3; Tacitus, Life of Gnaeus Julius Agricola 10; Tacitus, Annals XIII.20.
  162. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.20; Tacitus, Annals XIV.2.
  163. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.20; Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XIX.1.13.
  164. ^ Tacitus, Annals XIII.20.
  165. ^ Tacitus, Annals I.1; Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XX.8.3.
  166. ^ Dio Chrysostom, Discourse XXI, On Beauty.
  167. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews XX.8.3.
  168. ^ Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (Civil War) (c. 65).
  169. ^ Pliny the Elder, Natural Histories VII.8.46.
  170. ^ Seneca the Younger, Apocolocyntosis 4.
  171. ^ Tacitus, Annals I.1.
  172. ^ Tacitus, History I.1.
  173. ^ Isaac, Benjamin (2004) The Invention of Racism in Classical Antiquity pp. 440-491. Princeton.
  174. ^ Suetonius The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero, chapter 16.
  175. ^ Tertullian Apologeticum, lost text quoted in [4], Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, II.25.4.
  176. ^ a b Lactantius, Of the Manner in Which the Persecutors Died II.
  177. ^ Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.28.
  178. ^ Suetonius The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Claudius 25.
  179. ^ Acts of the Apostles 18:2.
  180. ^ a b Ascension of Isaiah Chapter 4.2.
  181. ^ Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History II.25.5.
  182. ^ In the apocryphal Acts of Paul, in the apocryphal Acts of Peter, in the First Epistle of Clement 5:6, and in The Muratorian Fragment.
  183. ^ Apocryphal Acts of Peter.
  184. ^ Lactantius wrote that Nero crucified Peter, and slew Paul., Lactantius, Of the Manner in Which the Persecutors Died II; John Chrysostom wrote Nero knew Paul personally and had him killed, John Chrysostom, Concerning Lowliness of Mind 4; Sulpicius Severus says Nero killed Peter and Paul, Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.28-29.
  185. ^ Sibylline Oracles 5.361-376, 8.68-72, 8.531-157.
  186. ^ Sulpicius Severus and Victorinus of Pettau also say Nero is the Antichrist, Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.28-29; Victorinus of Pettau, Commentary on the Apocalypse 17.
  187. ^ http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?book_id=60&chapter=2&verse=7&version=9&context=verse
  188. ^ The Book of Revelation, Catherine A. Cory.
  189. ^ Revelation, Alan John Philip Garrow.
  190. ^ Hillers, Delbert, “Rev. 13, 18 and a scroll from Murabba’at”, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 170 (1963) 65.
  191. ^ The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Ed. Raymond E. Brown, Joseph A. Fitzmyer, and Roland E. Murphy. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1990. 1009.
  192. ^ Just, S.J., Ph.D., Prof. Felix. "The Book of Revelation, Apocalyptic Literature, and Millennial Movements, University of San Francisco, USF Jesuit Community". http://catholic-resources.org/Bible/Apocalyptic.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-18. 
  193. ^ Edward Cook. "The Number of the Beast: 616?". http://ralphriver.blogspot.com/2005/04/number-of-beast-616.html. 

References

Primary sources

Secondary material

Nero
Born: December 15 37 Died: June 8 68 AD
Political offices
Preceded by
Claudius
Roman Emperor
54 – 68
Succeeded by
Galba
Julio-Claudian dynasty
54 – 68
Dynasty ended
Preceded by
Marcus Acilius Aviola and Marcus Asinius Marcellus
Consul of the Roman Empire (with Lucius Antistius Vetus)
55
Succeeded by
Quintus Volusius Saturninus and Publius Cornelius Lentulus Scipio
Preceded by
Quintus Volusius Saturninus and Publius Cornelius Lentulus Scipio
Consul of the Roman Empire
57 – 58
Succeeded by
Gaius Vipstanus Apronianus and Gaius Fonteius Capito
Preceded by
Gaius Vipstanus Apronianus and Gaius Fonteius Capito
Consul of the Roman Empire (with Cossus Cornelius Lentulus)
60
Succeeded by
Publius Petronius Turpilianus and Lucius Caesennius Paetus

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (15 December AD 37 - 9 June AD 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, was Emperor of Rome from AD 54 to AD 68.

Sourced

  • Hidden talent counts for nothing.
    • Quoted in "The Flames of Rome" - Page 221 by Paul L. Maier - 1991
  • Qualis artifex pereo.
    • Translation: What an artist dies in me!
    • Translation: What an artisan I am in dying!
    • Translation: So great an artist, I die!
    • Quoted in "Nero" - Page 51 by Edward Champlin - History - 2003

Unsourced

.
  • Finally I can live like a human being.^ When the edifice was finished in this style and he dedicated it, he deigned to say nothing more in the way of approval than that he was at last beginning to be housed like a human being.
    • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • after moving into the Golden House, built upon burned out areas after the great fire of Rome.
  • The world is losing a great artist (dies).^ Houses after the fire were spaced out, built in brick, and faced by porticos on wide roads.
    • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
    • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And all the people said: We will not only cast him out, but on the very instant will we burn him with fire.

    • Said when the Praetorian Guard forced his suicide.

External links

Wikipedia
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Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Nero
by Clark Ashton Smith
1912.
.This Rome, that was the toil of many men,
The consummation of laborious years—
Fulfilment's crown to visions of the dead
And image of the wide desire of kings—
Is made my darkling dream's effulgency,
Fuel of vision, brief embodiment
Of wandering will and wastage of the strong
Fierce ecstasy of one tremendous hour,
When ages piled on ages like a pyre
Flamed to the years behind and years to be.
^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In the eleventh year of his age, he was adopted by Claudius, and placed under the tuition of Annaeus Seneca /2/ , who had been made a senator.

^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


.
Yet any sunset were as much as this,
Save for the music forced from tongueless things,
The rape of Matter's huge, unchorded harp
By the many-fingered fire—a music pierced
With the tense voice of Life, more quick to cry
Its agony—and save that I believed
The radiance redder for the blood of men.
^ He will destroy many men and great rulers, and he will set fire to all men as no one else ever did.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And a very great fear fell upon the brethren because of the voice which came from heaven: and they were confirmed yet more in the faith.

^ And thou hearing it didst begin to cry out yet more: Come thou, our true sword, Jesu Christ.


.Destruction hastens and intensifies
The process that is beauty, manifests
Ranges of form unknown before, and gives
Motion, and voice, and hue, where otherwise
Bleak inexpressiveness had levelled all.
^ These he received with the greatest delight, not only giving audience before all others to the envoys who brought them, but even inviting them to his private table.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]


.
If one create, there is the lengthy toil;
The labored years and days league toward an end
Less than the measure of desire, mayhap,
After the sure consuming of all strength
And strain of faculties that otherwhere
Were loosed upon enjoyment; and at last
Remains to one capacity nor power
For pleasure in the thing that he hath made.
^ Indeed, in Tacitus’s estimationit very nearly was so: “This was the condition of the Roman state when Serius Galba, chosen consul for the second time, and his colleague Titus Vinius entered upon the year that was to be for Galba his last and for the state almost the end.” .
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Claudius at the same time broke off the connection; Silanus was forced to resign his office, and the one remaining day of his praetorship was conferred on Eprius Marcellus.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He made no scruple of exhibiting on the stage, even in the spectacles presented to the people by private persons, and was offered by one of the praetors, no less than a million of sesterces for his services.


.But on destruction hangs but little use
Of time or faculty, but all is turned
To the one purpose, unobstructed, pure,
Of sensuous rapture and observant joy;
And from the intensities of death and ruin
One draws a heightened and completer life,
And both extends and vindicates himself.
^ For he used to lie upon his back and hold a leaden plate on his chest, purge himself by the syringe and by vomiting, and deny himself fruits and all foods injurious to the voice.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ From this battle the peoples receive a mightier wound than their own time could bear; more was lost than life and safety: for all the world's eternity we are prostrated.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ No one can lead a happy life if he thinks only of himself and turns everything to his own purposes.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]


.
I would I were a god, with all the scope
Of attributes that are the essential core
Of godhead, and its visibility.
^ He had requested of his attendants, as the most essential favour, that they would let no one have his head, but that by all means his body might be burnt entire.

^ O ye men of Rome, if ye knew the Scriptures of the prophets, I would expound all unto you: by which Scriptures it was necessary that this should be spoken in a mystery, and that the kingdom of God should be perfected.


.I am but emperor, and hold awhile
The power to hasten death upon its way,
And cry a halt to worn and lagging Life
For others, but for mine own self may not
Delay the one nor bid the other speed.
^ Some ingenuously confessed the charge; others avowed that they thought the design against his life an act of favour for which he was obliged to them, as it was impossible in any other way than by death to relieve a person rendered infamous by crimes of the greatest enormity.

^ Then he at once called for the gladiator Spiculus or any other adept at whose hand he might find death, and when no one appeared, he cried "Have I then neither friend nor foe?"
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ No one can lead a happy life if he thinks only of himself and turns everything to his own purposes.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]


.There have been many kings, and they are dead,
And have no power in death save what the wind
Confers upon their blown and brainless dust
To vex the eyeballs of posterity.
^ NO! It's there so that the government will have power but not too much.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There is no evidence they were performed, but they easily could have been.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no question that John looked for Nero literally to return from the dead to fulfill the role of the antichrist.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]


But were I God, I would be overlord
Of many kings, and were as breath to guide
Their dust of destiny. .And were I God,
Exempt from this mortality which clogs
Perception and clear exercise of will,
What rapture it would be, if but to watch
Destruction crouching at the back of Time,
The tongueless dooms which dog the travelling suns;
The vampire, Silence, at the breast of worlds,
Fire without light that gnaws the base of things,
And Lethe's mounting tide that rots the stone
Of fundamental spheres.
^ It would be better for humans to be dumb and without reason than to turn these gifts to mutual destruction.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He would lie upon his back with a sheet of lead upon his breast, clear his stomach and bowels by vomits and clysters, and forbear the eating of fruits, or food prejudicial to the voice.

^ They lucked out with the oil and the only reason they don’t hold the world hostage is because they know it would mean their destruction.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.This were enough
Till such time as the dazzled wings of will
Came up with power's accession, scarcely felt
For very suddenness.
^ I’m sure if I wasn’t talking to another one at the time I could have gone home with her as she was leaving she came up to me.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What kingdom was coming to power in the Old Roman Empire during the time that these three barbarian tribes were plucked up?
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Not equally moderate was his brother, surnamed Felix, who had for some time been governor of Judaea, and thought that he could do any evil act with impunity, backed up as he was by such power.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Then I would urge
The strong contention and conflicting might
Of Chaos and Creation—matching them,
Those immemorial powers inimical,
And all their stars and gulfs subservient,
Dynasts of time, and anarchs of the dark—
In closer war reverseless, and would set
New discord at the universal core—
A Samson-principle to bring it down
In one magnificence of ruin.
^ David Bowie, the most famous pop star of all time (in my humble opinion.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Did ye suppose that he would not turn you away to make you enemies of the kingdom of God, and cast you down into perdition by a new (or the last) deceit?

^ He centralized all power in himself as leader of the Fascist party and attempted to create an Italian empire, ultimately in alliance with Hitler's Germany.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Yea,
The monster, Chaos, were mine unleashed hound,
And all my power Destruction's own right arm!
^ If I knew, O Peter, that thou couldest be won with money, I would give thee all my substance, yea I would give it and despise it, that I might gain my soul.


.
I would exult to mark the smouldering stars
Renew beneath my breath their elder fire
And feed upon themselves to nothingness.
^ Good thing she did not attack me while I was gaining my breath or I would have sent her flying.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]


.The might of suns—slow-paced with swinging weight
Of myriad worlds—were made at my desire
One orb of roaring and torrential light,
Through which the voice of Life were audible,
And singing of the immemorial dead,
Whose dust is loosened into vaporous wings
With soaring wrack of systems ruinous.
^ The two lampstands refer to the lampstands in the temple which speaks of God's witness through the nation of Israel as the light of the world.
  • End Time Prophecy - Revelation - Glossary of Symbols 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.northforest.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "I call you to witness, my lords and gentlemen," said he, "that since the day I was made a god I have never uttered one word.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Now much of my attention is diverted, and to some degree, I can’t seem to serve God on a level as much as one might argue that I should.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]


.And were I weary of the glare of these,
I would tear out the eyes of light, and stand
Above a chaos of extinguished suns,
That crowd and grind and shiver thunderously,
Lending vast voice and motion but no ray
To the stretched silence of the blinded gulfs.
^ In short, for eight whole days making no attempt to write a reply to anyone, none to give any commission or command, he blotted out the affair with silence.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In short for eight whole days making no attempt to write a reply to anyone, nor even to give any commission or command, he blotted out the affair with silence.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Immediately after pronouncing these words, he expired, with his eyes fixed and starting out of his head, to the terror of all who beheld him.


.Thus would I give my godhead space and speech
For its assertion, and thus pleasure it,
Hastening the feet of Time with cast of worlds
Like careless pebbles, or, with shattered suns,
Brightening the aspect of Eternity.
^ I would like to post my opinion.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From this battle the peoples receive a mightier wound than their own time could bear; more was lost than life and safety: for all the world's eternity we are prostrated.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If I knew, O Peter, that thou couldest be won with money, I would give thee all my substance, yea I would give it and despise it, that I might gain my soul.

PD-icon.svg This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.
.The author died in 1930, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 75 years or less.^ Project Gutenberg volunteers and employees expend considerable effort to identify, do copyright research on, transcribe and proofread public domain works in creating the Project Gutenberg-tm collection.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nearly all the individual works in the collection are in the public domain in the United States.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Creating the works from public domain print editions means that no one owns a United States copyright in these works, so the Foundation (and you!
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.^ Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License ; additional terms may apply.
  • Nero Wolfe - Wikiquote 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Project Gutenberg volunteers and employees expend considerable effort to identify, do copyright research on, transcribe and proofread public domain works in creating the Project Gutenberg-tm collection.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They may be modified and printed and given away--you may do practically ANYTHING with public domain eBooks.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.NERO (37-68), Roman emperor 54-68, was born at Antium on the 15th of December 37. He was the son of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Agrippina the younger, and his name was originally L. Domitius Ahenobarbus.^ Nero ruled from 54 to 68.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Roman emperor ( ad 54–68), stepson and heir of the emperor Claudius.
  • Nero (Roman emperor) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero was born at Antium (Anzio) on 15 December AD 37 and was first named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus.

.His father died when Nero was scarcely three years old.^ His father died when Nero was scarcely three years old.

^ Nero’s father, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus , died in about ad 40, and Nero was brought up by his mother, Agrippina the Younger , a great-granddaughter of the emperor Augustus.
  • Nero (Roman emperor) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 54, Claudius died, having eaten some poisoned mushrooms, responsibility for which was believed to be Agrippina's , [[3]] and the young Nero, not yet seventeen years old, was hailed on October 13 as emperor by the praetorian guard.

.In the previous year (39) his mother had been banished by order of her brother Caligula (Gains) on a charge of treasonable conspiracy, and Nero, thus early deprived of both parents, found shelter in the house of his aunt Domitia, where two slaves, a barber and a dancer, began his training.^ Then his mother was banished too, and he was brought up at the house of his aunt Lepida almost in actual want, under two tutors, a dancer and a barber.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ When Nero was two, his mother was banished by Caligula to the Pontian Islands.

^ NERO was introduced to the art of poetry at a very young age by his mother who allowed him to gain an appreciation for it early on in his life.
  • Nero on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The emperor Claudius recalled Agrippina, who spent the next thirteen years in the determined struggle to win for Nero the throne which had been predicted for him.^ Next to fall was Agrippina, Nero’s mother.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero’s father, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus , died in about ad 40, and Nero was brought up by his mother, Agrippina the Younger , a great-granddaughter of the emperor Augustus.
  • Nero (Roman emperor) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ NERO was introduced to the art of poetry at a very young age by his mother who allowed him to gain an appreciation for it early on in his life.
  • Nero on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Her first decisive success was gained in 48 by the disgrace and execution of Messallina (q.v.), wife of Claudius. .In 49 followed her own marriage with Claudius, and her recognition as his consort in the government.'^ In 49 followed her own marriage with Claudius, and her recognition as his consort in the government.'

^ Nero Claudius Caesar would eventually take precedence over Claudius' own son Britannicus through the scheming of his mother Agrippina, including the eventual marriage to Claudius' daughter Octavia.
  • Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.unrv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the year of the consulship of Caius Pompeius and Quintus Veranius, the marriage arranged between Claudius and Agrippina was confirmed both by popular rumour and by their own illicit love.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The Roman populace already looked with favour on Nero, as the grandson of Germanicus, but in 50 his claims obtained formal recognition from Claudius himself, who adopted him under the title of Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus.2 Agrippina's next step was to provide a suitable training for her son.^ It was at his adoption that he assumed the name Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus.

^ Livilla (dau of Nero Claudius Germanicus Drusus) @8@ below .
  • romans1 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.stirnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He sometimes referred to himself as Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.The scholar L. Annaeus Seneca was recalled from exile and appointed his tutor.^ The scholar L. Annaeus Seneca was recalled from exile and appointed his tutor.

^ Senator Annaeus Seneca was recalled from exile and became Nero's tutor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's mother had a mind to commit any crime to put him on the throne, and to prepare him for this station she had L. Annaeus Seneca appointed his tutor, and caused the freedman Afranius Burrus, a rough but experienced soldier, to be made commander of the Praetorian guard.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Nero - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: General]

.On the 15th of December 51 Nero completed his fourteenth year, and Agrippina, in view of Claudius's failing health, determined to delay no longer his adoption of the toga virilis. The occasion was celebrated in a manner which seemed to place Nero's prospects of succession beyond doubt.^ It's no longer the Nero we knew so well.
  • Nero 9 Lite is junk... - alt.comp.freeware | Google Groups 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Agrippina's bold 'stroke had been completely successful.

^ It was then resolved to delay no longer.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He was introduced to the senate by Claudius himself.^ He was introduced to the senate by Claudius himself.

^ When Claudius replied that he was one among the citizens and could not resist their unanimous voice, Vitellius requested him to wait in the palace, while he himself went to the Senate.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The proconsular imperium and the title of princeps juventutis were conferred upon him.'^ The proconsular imperium and the title of princeps juventutis were conferred upon him.'

^ The Senate had to officially offer the post to the chosen candidate, who would then accept the various titles conferred on him.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.He was specially admitted as an extraordinary member of the great priestly colleges; his name was included by the Arval Brethren in their prayers for the safety of the emperor and his house; at the games in the circus his appearance in triumphal dress contrasted significantly with the simple toga praetexta worn by Britannicus.^ He was specially admitted as an extraordinary member of the great priestly colleges; his name was included by the Arval Brethren in their prayers for the safety of the emperor and his house; at the games in the circus his appearance in triumphal dress contrasted significantly with the simple toga praetexta worn by Britannicus .

^ Lucius would later change his name after his was adopted by his great uncle, the emperor Claudius whom his mother had married and whom she and Nero would later conspire to poison (Agrippina and Nero also murdered Claudius' son Britannicus).
  • Thoughtless for the Day: And I Saw a Gefilte Fish Rise from the Ocean 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.rodneyanonymous.com [Source type: General]

^ VII. While he was still a young, half-grown boy, he took part in the game of Troy at a performance in the Circus with great self-possession and success.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.During the next two years Agrippina followed this up with energy.^ During the next two years Agrippina followed this up with energy.

^ D URING the two years that followed the death of Nero, there were three emperors, Galba, Otho, and Vitellius.
  • The Baldwin Project: Famous Men of Rome by John H. Haaren & A. B. Poland 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.mainlesson.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Poppaea became Nero's mistress in 58 A.D., and the next year Agrippina herself was murdered, with Nero's knowledge.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.Britannicus's leading partisans were banished or put to death, and the allimportant command of the praetorian guard was transferred to Afranius Burrus, a Gaul by birth, who had been the trusted agent first of Livia and then of Tiberius and Claudius.^ Britannicus's leading partisans were banished or put to death, and the allimportant command of the praetorian guard was transferred to Afranius Burrus, a Gaul by birth, who had been the trusted agent first of Livia and then of Tiberius and Claudius.

^ He banished her, and soon he had her put to death.

^ When Claudius , possibly helped along by a dish of poisoned mushrooms, died in 54 CE, Agrippina managed, with the support of Burrus, commander of the Praetorian Guard, to have the claims of Claudius ’ natural son Britannicus, set aside in favor of her own child, Nero.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Nero himself was put prominently forward.^ Nero himself was put prominently forward.

^ When the populace and Nero were seeking victims for revenge, the Jews may have been glad of the opportunity of putting forward the Christians and may have been encouraged in this by Poppea.

.The petitions addressed to the senate by the town of Bononia and by the communities of Rhodes and Ilium were gracefully supported by him in Latin and Greek speeches, and during Claudius's absence in 52 at the Latin festival it was Nero who, as praefect of the city, administered justice in the forum.^ The petitions addressed to the senate by the town of Bononia and by the communities of Rhodes and Ilium were gracefully supported by him in Latin and Greek speeches, and during Claudius's absence in 52 at the Latin festival it was Nero who, as praefect of the city, administered justice in the forum .

^ Among those who killed themselves were Nero's former tutor, Seneca, and a senator called Gaius Calpurnius Piso, who had actually been involved in a plot to overthrow Nero.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ NERO was introduced to the art of poetry at a very young age by his mother who allowed him to gain an appreciation for it early on in his life.
  • Nero on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Early in S3 his marriage with Tac.^ Early in S3 his marriage with Tac.

Ann. xii. 26, 36; see also Schiller, Nero, 67.
2 Tac. Ann. xii. 26; Zonaras xi. 10.
3 Tac. Ann. xii. 41.
.Claudius's daughter Octavia drew still closer the ties which connected him with the imperial house.^ Claudius's daughter Octavia drew still closer the ties which connected him with the imperial house.

^ After poisoning her second husband, Agrippina incestuously became the wife of her uncle, the emperor Claudius , and persuaded him to favour Nero for the succession, over the rightful claim of his own son, Britannicus, and to marry his daughter, Octavia, to Nero.
  • Nero (Roman emperor) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He put to death Antonia, daughter of Claudius, for refusing to marry him after Poppaea's death, charging her with an attempt at revolution; and he treated in the same way all others who were in any way connected with him by blood or by marriage.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Agrippina determined to hasten the death of Claudius, and the absence, through illness, of the emperor's trusted freedman Narcissus, favoured her schemes.^ Agrippina determined to hasten the death of Claudius, and the absence, through illness, of the emperor's trusted freedman Narcissus , favoured her schemes.

^ In fact it became the reason of his very downfall, as the emperor's next wife Agrippina the younger saw to it that the freedman Pallas, who was finance minister, soon eclipsed Narcissus' powers.

^ With the assistance of the emperor's freedman, Pallas, Agrippina proved the successful candidate for Claudius' affections.

.On the 13th of October 54 Claudius died, poisoned, as all our authorities declare, by her orders, and Nero was presented to the soldiers on guard as their new sovereign.^ On the 13th of October 54 Claudius died, poisoned, as all our authorities declare, by her orders, and Nero was presented to the soldiers on guard as their new sovereign.

^ When Claudius , possibly helped along by a dish of poisoned mushrooms, died in 54 CE, Agrippina managed, with the support of Burrus, commander of the Praetorian Guard, to have the claims of Claudius ’ natural son Britannicus, set aside in favor of her own child, Nero.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 54, Claudius died, having eaten some poisoned mushrooms, responsibility for which was believed to be Agrippina's , [[3]] and the young Nero, not yet seventeen years old, was hailed on October 13 as emperor by the praetorian guard.

.From the steps of the palace he proceeded to the praetorian camp to receive the salutations of the troops, and thence to the senate-house, where he was promptly invested with all the honours, titles and powers of emperor.'^ From the steps of the palace he proceeded to the praetorian camp to receive the salutations of the troops, and thence to the senate-house, where he was promptly invested with all the honours, titles and powers of emperor.'

^ He made a palace extending all the way from the Palatine to the Esquiline, which at first he called the House of Passage, but when it was burned shortly after its completion and rebuilt, the Golden House."
  • Nero - Former Things - Biblical Archaeology and The Bible 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC formerthings.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was discovered by the praetorians and taken to their camp, where the two praetorian prefects proposed him to the troops who hailed him emperor.

.Agrippina's bold 'stroke had been completely successful.^ Agrippina's bold 'stroke had been completely successful.

.Only a few voices were raised for Britannicus; nor is there any doubt that Rome was prepared to welcome the new emperor with genuine enthusiasm.^ Only a few voices were raised for Britannicus; nor is there any doubt that Rome was prepared to welcome the new emperor with genuine enthusiasm.

^ The emperor, abandoned by all but a few followers, fled to a villa a few miles south of Rome and there, with the help of a faithful freedman, stabbed himself in the throat.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There began a fierce persecution throughout the empire, and through robbery and confiscation the Christians were forced to pay in great part for the building of the new Rome .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.His prestige and his good qualities, carefully fostered by Seneca, made him popular, while his childish vanity, ungovernable selfishness and savage temper were as yet unsuspected.^ His prestige and his good qualities, carefully fostered by Seneca, made him popular, while his childish vanity, ungovernable selfishness and savage temper were as yet unsuspected.

^ It seems to me worth p89 while to give an account of several members of this family, to show more clearly that though Nero degenerated from the good qualities of his ancestors, he yet reproduced the vices of each of them, as if transmitted to him by natural inheritance.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It seems to me worth while to give an account of several members of this family, to show more clearly that though Nero degenerated from the good qualities of his ancestors, he yet reproduced the vices of each of them, as if transmitted to him by natural inheritance.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.His first acts confirmed this favourable impression.^ His first acts confirmed this favourable impression.

.He modestly declined the title of pater patriae; the memory of Claudius, and that of his own father Domitius were duly honoured.^ He modestly declined the title of pater patriae; the memory of Claudius, and that of his own father Domitius were duly honoured.

^ He paid likewise the highest honours to the memory of his father Domitius.

^ He paid the highest honours to the memory of his father Domitius.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The senate listened with delight to his promises to rule according to the maxims of Augustus, and to avoid the errors which had rendered unpopular the rule of his predecessor, while his unfailing clemency, liberality and affability were the talk of Rome.^ The senate listened with delight to his promises to rule according to the maxims of Augustus, and to avoid the errors which had rendered unpopular the rule of his predecessor, while his unfailing clemency, liberality and affability were the talk of Rome.

^ Nero’s death brought to an end the Julio-Claudian dynasty that had ruled Rome since Augustus, and its replacement required justification.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 54, Nero promised to give the Senate powers equivalent to those under Republican rule.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Much no doubt of the credit of all this is due to Seneca and Burrus.^ Much no doubt of the credit of all this is due to Seneca and Burrus.

^ Burrus dying in A.D. 62, left Seneca no longer able to withstand the influence of Poppaea and of Sophonius Tigellinus, prefect of the Praetorian guards.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But, when Burrus died in 62 CE and was replaced as prefect by the unscrupulous Tigellinus, Seneca lost all influence over his former pupil and soon retired from the scene.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Seneca had seen from the first that the real danger with Nero lay in the savage vehemence of his passions, and he made it his chief aim to stave off by every means in his power the dreaded outbreak.^ Seneca had seen from the first that the real danger with Nero lay in the savage vehemence of his passions, and he made it his chief aim to stave off by every means in his power the dreaded outbreak.

^ His prestige and his good qualities, carefully fostered by Seneca, made him popular, while his childish vanity, ungovernable selfishness and savage temper were as yet unsuspected.

^ In fact, Nero, most likely largely due to the influence of his tutor Seneca, came across as a very humane ruler at first.

.The policy of indulging his tastes and helping him to enjoy.^ The policy of indulging his tastes and helping him to enjoy.

the sweets of popularity without the actual burdens of government succeeded for the time. .During the first five years of his reign, the golden quinquenniunz Neronis, little occurred to damp the popular enthusiasm.^ During the first five years of his reign, the golden quinquenniunz Neronis, little occurred to damp the popular enthusiasm.

^ The positive influence of Burrus and Seneca resulted in five very stable and well-managed years; Nero appeared to have attained a level of popularity never managed by Claudius.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was during the earlier "golden quinquennium" of Nero's reign that Paul addressed his epistle to the Christians at Rome, and probably in the last year of Nero's reign (68 A.D.) Paul suffered death near the city, though Harnack (Chronologie) places his death in the first Neronian persecution of 64.

.Nero's promises of constitutional moderation were amply fulfilled, and the senate found itself free to discuss and even to decide important administrative questions.^ Nero's promises of constitutional moderation were amply fulfilled, and the senate found itself free to discuss and even to decide important administrative questions.

^ In 54, Nero promised to give the Senate powers equivalent to those under Republican rule.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero ought to be ashamed of itself, selling a product that they haven't even tested.
  • Cannot install Nero 9 - Official Nero Forum 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC forum.my.nero.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Abuses were remedied, the provincials protected from oppression, and the burdens of taxation lightened.^ Abuses were remedied, the provincials protected from oppression, and the burdens of taxation lightened.

.On the frontiers, thanks chiefly to Corbulo's energy and skill, no disaster occurred serious enough to shake the general confidence, and even the murder of Britannicus seems to have been accepted as a necessary measure of selfdefence.^ The second, "Frame-Up for Murder," is an expanded rewrite of the 1958 novella "Murder Is No Joke" that was serialized in The Saturday Evening Post but never published in book form.
  • Nero Wolfe - Wikiquote 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

.But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.^ But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.

^ A Caesar should be feared, though Seneca says he should be loved.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Her first object was the final ruin of Agrippina, and by rousing Nero's jealousy and fear she induced him to seek her death, with the aid of a freedman Anicetus , praefect of the fleet of Misenum .

.The success of Seneca's own management of Nero largely depended on his being able gradually to emancipate the emperor from his mother's control.^ The success of Seneca's own management of Nero largely depended on his being able gradually to emancipate the emperor from his mother's control.

^ The positive influence of Burrus and Seneca resulted in five very stable and well-managed years; Nero appeared to have attained a level of popularity never managed by Claudius.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In fact, Nero, most likely largely due to the influence of his tutor Seneca, came across as a very humane ruler at first.

.During the first few months of Nero's reign the chances of such an emancipation seemed remote, for he treated his mother with elaborate respect and consulted her on all affairs of state.^ During the first few months of Nero's reign the chances of such an emancipation seemed remote, for he treated his mother with elaborate respect and consulted her on all affairs of state.

^ At first Nero seemed quite decent.

^ Suetonius does report that Nero was very popular with the public during and for centuries after his reign.
  • Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.rome101.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In 55, however, Seneca found a powerful ally in Nero's passion for the beautiful freedwoman Acte, a passion which he deliberately encouraged.^ In 55, however, Seneca found a powerful ally in Nero's passion for the beautiful freedwoman Acte, a passion which he deliberately encouraged.

^ From 55 CE, Nero was involved in an affair with his freedwoman, Acte.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ While there were a few initial executions (many of them encouraged by his mother) this was moderated when Nero made his old tutor, the Stoic philosopher and orator Seneca, his advisor, and Seneca became a power behind the throne.

.Agrippina's angry remonstrances served only to irritate Nero, and caresses equally failed.^ Agrippina's angry remonstrances served only to irritate Nero, and caresses equally failed.

^ Since Nero was only an adolescent, the early part of his reign was characterized by direction from these older figures, including Agrippina herself.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.She then rashly tried intimidation and threatened to espouse the cause of Britannicus.^ She then rashly tried intimidation and threatened to espouse the cause of Britannicus.

.Nero retaliated by poisoning Britannicus.^ Nero retaliated by poisoning Britannicus.

^ In AD 55, Agrippina saw the bonds of her domination of Nero loosening and intrigued in favor of Claudius' son, Britannicus, but Nero poisoned the boy.
  • Nero Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero claimed that Britannicus died from an epileptic seizure, but ancient historians all claim Britannicus' death came from Nero poisoning him.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Agrippina then tried to win over Nero's neglected wife Octavia, and to form a party of her own.^ Agrippina then tried to win over Nero's neglected wife Octavia, and to form a party of her own.

^ Agrippina, presumably seeing the departure of Nero's apparent friend as an opportunity to reassert herself, sided with Nero's wife, Octavia, who naturally opposed her husbands affair with Poppaea Sabina.

^ Though Claudius already had children of his own, Britannicus and Octavia, he was persuaded to adopt Agrippina’s son as well and the boy was renamed Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Nero dismissed her guards, and placed her in a sort of honourable confinement (Tac.^ Nero dismissed her guards, and placed her in a sort of honourable confinement (Tac.

^ Their place was filled by Poppaea, and the infamous Tigellinus, whose sympathy with Nero's sensual tastes had gained him the command of the praetorian guards in succession to Burrus.

Ann. xiii. 12-20). .During nearly three years she disappears from the history, and with her retirement things again for the time went smoothly.^ During nearly three years she disappears from the history, and with her retirement things again for the time went smoothly.

^ This portrait type appears to have lasted only one year, during which time Agrippina disappears from the coins.
  • Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.rome101.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During the last three years of his life Seneca could concentrate on philosophy and wrote more than a hundred letters to Lucilius, the procurator in Sicily.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.In 58, however, fresh cause for anxiety appeared, when Nero was enslaved by Poppaea Sabina, a woman of a very different stamp from her predecessor.^ In 58, however, fresh cause for anxiety appeared, when Nero was enslaved by Poppaea Sabina, a woman of a very different stamp from her predecessor.

^ When Nero had seduced Poppaea Sabina, the wife of his friend Salvius Otho, she resented playing the role of concubine and aspired to that of empress.
  • Nero - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: General]

^ The positive influence of Burrus and Seneca resulted in five very stable and well-managed years; Nero appeared to have attained a level of popularity never managed by Claudius.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.High-born, wealthy and accomplished, she was resolved to be Nero's wife, and set herself to remove the obstacles which stood in her way.^ High-born, wealthy and accomplished, she was resolved to be Nero's wife, and set herself to remove the obstacles which stood in her way.

^ I have deleted all references to AHEAD and NERO. I have run regedit as administrator and removed all references to NERO or AHEAD. However there is one key that is locked and I cannot find a way to delete it...
  • Cannot install Nero 9 - Official Nero Forum 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC forum.my.nero.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero's father was reported to have said that nothing born to him and his wife would achieve anything other than loathing and heaping disaster on the State (Suetonius: Nero 6).
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.Her first object was the final ruin of Agrippina, and by rousing Nero's jealousy and fear she induced him to seek her death, with the aid of a freedman Anicetus, praefect of the fleet of Misenum.^ Her first object was the final ruin of Agrippina, and by rousing Nero's jealousy and fear she induced him to seek her death, with the aid of a freedman Anicetus , praefect of the fleet of Misenum .

^ But Seneca's fear lest Nero's sleeping passions should once be roused were fully verified, and he seems to have seen all along where the danger lay, namely in Agrippina's imperious temper and insatiable love of power.

^ When finally the palace guards forsook their posts, Nero despairingly stole out of Rome to seek shelter in a freedman's villa some four miles off.

.Agrippina was invited to Baiae, and after an affectionate reception, was conducted on board a vessel so constructed as, at a given signal, Tac.^ Agrippina was invited to Baiae , and after an affectionate reception, was conducted on board a vessel so constructed as, at a given signal , Tac.

^ Accordingly, under colour of a pretended reconciliation, he wrote her an extremely affectionate letter, inviting her to Baiae, to celebrate with him the festival of Minerva.

Ann. xii. 96; Suet. Nero, 8.
to fall to pieces. .But Agrippina saved herself by swimming, and wrote to her son, announcing her escape, and affecting entire ignorance of the plot.^ But the plan did not succeed, and Agrippina saved herself by swimming ashore.

^ But Agrippina saved herself by swimming , and wrote to her son, announcing her escape, and affecting entire ignorance of the plot.

^ Making her way home, Agrippina decided her best course was to pretend ignorance of the attempt on her life and she sent word to her son that, by the grace of the gods, she had been saved from a terrible accident.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.A body of soldiers under Anicetus then surrounded her villa, and murdered her in her own chamber.^ A body of soldiers under Anicetus then surrounded her villa , and murdered her in her own chamber.

.Nero was horrorstruck at the enormity of the crime and terrified at its possible consequences.^ Nero was horrorstruck at the enormity of the crime and terrified at its possible consequences.

.But a six months' residence in Campania, and the congratulations which poured in upon him from the neighbouring towns, where the report had been officially spread that Agrippina had fallen a victim to her treacherous designs upon the emperor, gradually restored his courage.^ But a six months' residence in Campania , and the congratulations which poured in upon him from the neighbouring towns, where the report had been officially spread that Agrippina had fallen a victim to her treacherous designs upon the emperor, gradually restored his courage.

^ It was credibly reported, that the emperor was extremely desirous of furnishing him with living men to tear and devour.

^ The next reigning emperor, Galba, reigned but six months, the shortest reigning emperor until that time.
  • Andrew Corbett's Biblical Thinking Resources 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.andrewcorbett.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In September 59 he re-entered Rome amid universal rejoicing.^ In September 59 he re-entered Rome amid universal rejoicing.

.A prolonged carnival followed.^ A prolonged carnival followed.

.Chariot races, musical and dramatic exhibitions, games in the Greek fashion rapidly succeeded each other.^ Chariot races, musical and dramatic exhibitions, games in the Greek fashion rapidly succeeded each other.

^ The emperor capped his career by taking a tour of Greece in 67-8, entering large numbers of contents in music and chariot racing, (which he, of course, always won) collecting some 1808 crowns plus other awards.

^ When he attended the Olympics in 67, the Games were rigged so that he won a large number of awards, despite having fallen out of his chariot while competing in the chariot-racing event.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In all the emperor was a prominent figure, but these revels at least involved no bloodshed, and were civilized compared with the gladiatorial shows.^ In all the emperor was a prominent figure, but these revels at least involved no bloodshed, and were civilized compared with the gladiatorial shows.

^ Wealthy and prominent men were accused of conspiring against the emperor on all sorts of flimsy pretexts.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But in examining all of the circumstances involved and seeing what the Bible says it is no wonder that the prosperous and victorious Northern Kingdom of Israel would boast with a symbol of their enemy.
  • Bible History Online - Fallen Empires (Biblical Archaeology) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC bible-history.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.A far more serious result of the death of Agrippina was the growing influence over Nero of Poppaea and her friends.^ The positive influence of Burrus and Seneca resulted in five very stable and well-managed years; Nero appeared to have attained a level of popularity never managed by Claudius.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A3625904 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Poppaea Sabina , the wife of his friend Otho , became his mistress; according to rumor she was to blame for the worst of Nero's behavior.
  • Nero Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Agrippina, presumably seeing the departure of Nero's apparent friend as an opportunity to reassert herself, sided with Nero's wife, Octavia, who naturally opposed her husbands affair with Poppaea Sabina.

.In 62 Burrus died, it was said by poison, and Seneca retired from the unequal contest.^ But in 62 Burrus died.

^ Burrus dying in A.D. 62, left Seneca no longer able to withstand the influence of Poppaea and of Sophonius Tigellinus, prefect of the Praetorian guards.
  • Nero - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: General]

^ But, when Burrus died in 62 CE and was replaced as prefect by the unscrupulous Tigellinus, Seneca lost all influence over his former pupil and soon retired from the scene.
  • ACCLA - XII Caesars - Emperor Nero by Hugh Kramer 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.accla.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Their place was filled by Poppaea, and the infamous Tigellinus, whose sympathy with Nero's sensual tastes had gained him the command of the praetorian guards in succession to Burrus.^ Nero was also supported by Burrus, the commander the Praetorian forces.

^ Their place was filled by Poppaea, and the infamous Tigellinus, whose sympathy with Nero's sensual tastes had gained him the command of the praetorian guards in succession to Burrus.

^ Britannicus's leading partisans were banished or put to death, and the allimportant command of the praetorian guard was transferred to Afranius Burrus, a Gaul by birth, who had been the trusted agent first of Livia and then of Tiberius and Claudius.

.The haunting fear of conspiracy was skilfully used by them to direct Nero's suspicions against possible opponents.^ Nero banned any magistrate or procurator from exhibiting public entertainment for fear that the venue was being used as a method to extract bribes.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Frequently, conspiracies form because of lust for power or desire to rule; unusually, the Piso conspiracy developed as a direct challenge to Nero's capabilities and suitability as a ruler.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 65 CE a conspiracy formed against Nero led by Gaius Calpurnius Piso.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.Cornelius Sulla, who had been banished to Massilia in 58, was put to death on the ground that his residence in Gaul was likely to arouse disaffection in that province, and a similar charge proved fatal to Rubellius Plautus, who had for two years been living in retirement in Asia.^ He banished her, and soon he had her put to death.

^ Cornelius Sulla , who had been banished to Massilia in 58, was put to death on the ground that his residence in Gaul was likely to arouse disaffection in that province, and a similar charge proved fatal to Rubellius Plautus, who had for two years been living in retirement in Asia .

^ Britannicus's leading partisans were banished or put to death, and the allimportant command of the praetorian guard was transferred to Afranius Burrus, a Gaul by birth, who had been the trusted agent first of Livia and then of Tiberius and Claudius.

.2 Nero's taste for blood thus whetted, Octavia was divorced, banished to the island of Pandateria and barbarously murdered.^ Nero's tastes and habits were so lurid that after his mother's murder, he thoroughly and intimately examined her body, praising its beauty .
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Finally she, along with her son Nero Caesar, were banished to the island of Pandateria , as her mother Julia had been.
  • Ancient Roman History Timeline V 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.exovedate.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero divorced and banished Octavia on grounds of infertility, leaving him free to marry Poppaea.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Poppaea's triumph was now complete. .She was formally married to Nero; her head appeared on the coins side by side with his; and her statues were erected in the public places of Rome.^ Public performances Nero coin, c.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Rome Mint, NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS Laureate head right / Salus seated left, holding patera, SALVS in exergue.
  • Nero, Roman Imperial Coinage of, Thumbnail Index - WildWinds.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.wildwinds.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In the course of the year 6r Rome was startled by the news of a disaster in Britain.^ In the course of the year 6r Rome was startled by the news of a disaster in Britain .

^ The profound impression produced in Rome by the "British disaster" was confirmed two years later in A.D. 63 by the partial destruction of Pompeii by an earthquake , and the news of the evacuation of Armenia by the Roman legions.

^ Eight years later in 49 Seneca was recalled to Rome by the new empress Agrippina to tutor her son Nero; the next year he was appointed praetor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

At the time of the Claudian invasion of Britain in A.D. 43 Prasutagus, the king of the Iceni, had concluded a treaty with Claudius, by which no doubt he recognized the suzerainty of Rome and was himself enrolled among "the allies and friends of the Roman people." The alliance was of value to Claudius, for the territory of the Iceni (Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire) lay immediately north of the new province and its capital town Colchester, and Prasutagus had loyally kept faith with Rome. .But in A.D. 61 he died, leaving no male heir.^ But in A.D. 61 he died, leaving no male heir.

.His kingdom therefore lapsed to Rome, and Prasutagus, anxious that the transfer should be effected in an orderly way, divided his accumulated wealth between his two daughters and the emperor.^ His kingdom therefore lapsed to Rome, and Prasutagus, anxious that the transfer should be effected in an orderly way, divided his accumulated wealth between his two daughters and the emperor.

^ Fearing that worse might follow when the kingdom should be annexed, and encouraged by the absence of the legate and his legions, the Iceni, led by Prasutagus's daughter Boudicca (Boadicea) rose in revolt and were joined by the Trinobantes in Essex , who had been long subject to Rome and had their own grievances to redress.

^ For as soon as she was sure of her marriage, she began to aim at greater things, and planned an alliance between Domitius, her son by Cneius Aenobarbus, and Octavia, the emperor's daughter.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.His plan failed, for the local Roman officials acted as though the kingdom had been conquered in war; they seized on the property of the late king and his chiefs and insulted his family.^ Then they discussed the transmigration of souls and the Achaeans ruining Troy, though they felt talking so much about this war was the ruin of the Greeks.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They were defeated by Roman troops in the Jugurthine War in 105 BC and conquered by Rome in 46 BC. The Vandals and Byzantines ruled successively before Arabs conquered the area in the seventh century AD. Jugurtha was the king of Numidia.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (NGM, 5/77) 43CE The Romans brought with them the board game latrunculi (little soldiers), when they conquered Britain.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Fearing that worse might follow when the kingdom should be annexed, and encouraged by the absence of the legate and his legions, the Iceni, led by Prasutagus's daughter Boudicca (Boadicea) rose in revolt and were joined by the Trinobantes in Essex, who had been long subject to Rome and had their own grievances to redress.^ Fearing that worse might follow when the kingdom should be annexed, and encouraged by the absence of the legate and his legions, the Iceni, led by Prasutagus's daughter Boudicca (Boadicea) rose in revolt and were joined by the Trinobantes in Essex , who had been long subject to Rome and had their own grievances to redress.

^ As long ago as 54 the news reached Rome that the Parthian king Vologaeses had expelled the king recognized by Rome from Armenia and installed in his place his own brother Tiridates.

^ His kingdom therefore lapsed to Rome, and Prasutagus, anxious that the transfer should be effected in an orderly way, divided his accumulated wealth between his two daughters and the emperor.

.Colchester, since A.D. 50 a Roman colony, was sacked.^ Colchester, since A.D. 50 a Roman colony , was sacked.

.The ninth legion which had hurried from Lincoln was cut to pieces, and the insurgents prepared to march on London.^ The ninth legion which had hurried from Lincoln was cut to pieces, and the insurgents prepared to march on London .

^ All of the infantry in Rome's ninth legion were killed while the cavalry fled; about 70,000 were killed when London and Verulamium were sacked.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.The news of the outbreak found the legate Suetonius Paulinus engaged in attacking Anglesey.^ The news of the outbreak found the legate Suetonius Paulinus engaged in attacking Anglesey .

^ In the reign of Nero, his general, Suetonius Paulinus, attacked Mona or Anglesey, the chief seat of the Druids, and extirpated them with great cruelty.

^ In 59 Suetonius Paulinus attacked the hostile Druid center at Mona.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.His resolution was at once taken.^ His resolution was at once taken.

.At the head of such light troops as he could collect, he marched in haste along the Watling Street, leaving orders for the legions to follow.^ At the head of such light troops as he could collect, he marched in haste along the Watling Street , leaving orders for the legions to follow.

^ At last at some undefined point on the Watling Street his legions joined him.

^ He demanded that the wall be torn down, so the troops could keep order in the city.

.Though the tribes along the road were rising, Suetonius succeeded in reaching London, only however to find himself too weak to hold it.^ Though the tribes along the road were rising, Suetonius succeeded in reaching London, only however to find himself too weak to hold it.

.He was obliged to fall back along the road by which he had come.^ He was obliged to fall back along the road by which he had come.

.London first, and then Verulam, were abandoned to the Britons.^ London first, and then Verulam, were abandoned to the Britons.

.At last at some undefined point on the Watling Street his legions joined him.^ At last at some undefined point on the Watling Street his legions joined him.

^ At the head of such light troops as he could collect, he marched in haste along the Watling Street , leaving orders for the legions to follow.

.Thus reinforced he turned to face the enemy.^ Thus reinforced he turned to face the enemy.

.The engagement was severe but the Roman victory was decisive, and Roman authority was restored throughout central and southern Britain.^ The engagement was severe but the Roman victory was decisive, and Roman authority was restored throughout central and southern Britain.

.The profound impression produced in Rome by the "British disaster" was confirmed two years later in A.D. 63 by the partial destruction of Pompeii by an earthquake, and the news of the evacuation of Armenia by the Roman legions.^ The profound impression produced in Rome by the "British disaster" was confirmed two years later in A.D. 63 by the partial destruction of Pompeii by an earthquake , and the news of the evacuation of Armenia by the Roman legions.

^ In the course of the year 6r Rome was startled by the news of a disaster in Britain .

^ Various exaggerated accounts of the destruction are found in Roman historians: of the 14 city regions 7 were said to have been totally destroyed and 4 partially.

.A far deeper and more lasting impression was produced by the great fire in Rome.^ A far deeper and more lasting impression was produced by the great fire in Rome.

^ Nero is said to have considered giving up the province of Britannia because the revenue it produced was far lower than had been anticipated about a score of years before, and it cost Rome more to maintain and expand the province than the latter was able to produce.

^ After the Great Fire in AD 64 destroyed a major portion of Rome, to deflect blame from himself Nero used Rome's Christians as a scapegoat .
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.The fire broke out on the night of the 18th of July, 64, among the wooden booths at the south-east end of the Circus Maximus.^ On July 18, 64, this great conflagration broke out in Circus Maximus.

^ The fire broke out on the night of the 18th of July, 64, among the wooden booths at the south-east end of the Circus Maximus .

^ This destructive fire occurred in the end of July, or the beginning of August, A.D. 64.

.Thence in one direction it rapidly spread over the Palatine and 2 Tac.^ Thence in one direction it rapidly spread over the Palatine and 2 Tac.

Ann. xiv. 59.
.Velia up to the low cliffs of the Esquiline, and in another it laid waste the Aventine, the Forum Boarium and Velabrum till it reached the Tiber and the solid barrier of the Servian wall.^ Velia up to the low cliffs of the Esquiline, and in another it laid waste the Aventine, the Forum Boarium and Velabrum till it reached the Tiber and the solid barrier of the Servian wall.

.After burning fiercely for six days it suddenly started afresh in the northern quarter of the city and desolated the regions of the Circus Flaminius and the Via Lata, and by the time that it was finally quenched only four of the fourteen regiones remained untouched; three had been utterly destroyed and seven reduced to ruins.^ After burning fiercely for six days it suddenly started afresh in the northern quarter of the city and desolated the regions of the Circus Flaminius and the Via Lata, and by the time that it was finally quenched only four of the fourteen regiones remained untouched; three had been utterly destroyed and seven reduced to ruins.

^ We would like a 30-day trial rather than having the demo expire at the end of the month, which gave us only four days from our installation.
  • Nero 6 Ultra Edition 6.6.0.16 - Free software downloads and software reviews - CNET Download.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC download.cnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Various exaggerated accounts of the destruction are found in Roman historians: of the 14 city regions 7 were said to have been totally destroyed and 4 partially.

.The conflagration is said by all authorities later than Tacitus to have been deliberately caused by Nero himself.'^ The conflagration is said by all authorities later than Tacitus to have been deliberately caused by Nero himself.'

^ But whatever the feelings of others, Nero enjoyed himself so much that he repeated the "Neronia" after a short interval rather than wait five years for its scheduled return.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was said that the common Roman hailed Otho as Nero himself.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.But Tacitus, though he mentions the rumours, declares that its origin was uncertain, and in spite of such works as Profumo's Le fonti ed i tempi dello incendio Neroniano (1905), there is no proof of his guilt.^ But Tacitus, though he mentions the rumours, declares that its origin was uncertain, and in spite of such works as Profumo's Le fonti ed i tempi dello incendio Neroniano (1905), there is no proof of his guilt .

^ Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

^ I am an old Tucson hippie cowboy and have old school ideas, like there is no such thing as good acid in the southern 48.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.2 By Nero's orders, the open spaces in the Campus Martius were utilized to give shelter to the homeless crowds, provisions were brought from Ostia and the price of corn lowered.^ By Nero's orders, the open spaces in the Campus Martius were utilized to give shelter to the homeless crowds, provisions were brought from Ostia and the price of corn lowered.

^ After the fire, Nero opened his palaces to provide shelter for the homeless, and arranged for food supplies to be delivered in order to prevent starvation among the survivors.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Great Fire (July, 64): This difficulty was much increased by the great fire which was not only destructive to both private and state property, but also necessitated the providing thousands of homeless with shelter, and lowering the price of corn.

.In rebuilding the city every precaution was taken against the recurrence of such a calamity.^ In rebuilding the city every precaution was taken against the recurrence of such a calamity.

.Broad regular streets replaced the narrow winding alleys.^ Broad regular streets replaced the narrow winding alleys.

.The new houses were limited in height, built partly of hard stone and protected by open spaces and colonnades.^ The new houses were limited in height, built partly of hard stone and protected by open spaces and colonnades.

^ Houses after the fire were spaced out, built in brick, and faced by porticos on wide roads.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The water-supply, lastly, was carefully regulated.^ The water-supply , lastly, was carefully regulated.

.There is, however, no doubt that this great disaster told against Nero in the popular mind.^ There can be no doubt that the instrument employed by Nero was the cithara .
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There is, however, no doubt that this great disaster told against Nero in the popular mind.

^ Disasters, losses, and injuries have no more power against virtue than a cloud against the sun.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.It was regarded as a direct manifestation of the wrath of the gods, even by those who did not suspect the emperor.^ It was regarded as a direct manifestation of the wrath of the gods, even by those who did not suspect the emperor.

^ God seals those who are His.
  • End Time Prophecy - Revelation - Glossary of Symbols 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.northforest.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Of a man who denied that God exists he noted he may be right in regard to justice, or else how could this man be wealthy?
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.This impression no religious ceremonies, nor even the execution of a number of Christians, as convenient scapegoats, could altogether dispel.^ This impression no religious ceremonies, nor even the execution of a number of Christians, as convenient scapegoats, could altogether dispel.

^ Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

^ And by no exhortation could Theon prevail to persuade him to tarry there even one day.

.But Nero proceeded with the congenial work of repairing the damage.^ But Nero proceeded with the congenial work of repairing the damage.

^ Moments after the USS Kelvin hits the Narada, Nero and his crew struggle to repair damaged systems and restore power.
  • TrekInk: Early Review of Star Trek: Nero #1 | TrekMovie.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC trekmovie.com [Source type: General]

.In addition to the rebuilding of the streets, he erected a splendid palace, the "golden house," for himself.^ He made a palace extending all the way from the Palatine to the Esquiline, which at first he called the House of Passage, but when it was burned shortly after its completion and rebuilt, the Golden House.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He completed his palace by continuing it from the Palatine to the Esquiline hill, calling the building at first only "The Passage," but, after it was burnt down and rebuilt, "The Golden House."

.The wonders of his Domus aurea were remembered and talked of long after its partial demolition by Vespasian.^ The wonders of his Domus aurea were remembered and talked of long after its partial demolition by Vespasian .

.It stretched from the Palatine across the low ground, afterwards occupied by the Colosseum, to the Esquiline.^ It stretched from the Palatine across the low ground, afterwards occupied by the Colosseum, to the Esquiline.

.Gold, precious stones and Greek masterpieces adorned its walls.^ Gold , precious stones and Greek masterpieces adorned its walls.

.Most marvellous of all were the grounds in which it stood, with their meadows and lakes, their shady woods and their distant views.^ Most marvellous of all were the grounds in which it stood, with their meadows and lakes, their shady woods and their distant views.

.To defray the enormous cost, Italy and the provinces, says Tacitus, were ransacked, and in Asia and Achaia especially the rapacity of the imperial commissioners recalled the days of Mummius and of Sulla.^ To defray the enormous cost, Italy and the provinces, says Tacitus, were ransacked, and in Asia and Achaia especially the rapacity of the imperial commissioners recalled the days of Mummius and of Sulla.

^ And yet in past days Italy used to send supplies for the legions into distant provinces, and even now it is not a barren soil which causes distress.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ That same year the emperor was often heard to say that the legal decisions of the commissioners of the imperial treasury ought to have the same force as if pronounced by himself.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.3 It was the first occasion on which the provincials had suffered from Nero's rule, and the discontent it caused helped to weaken his hold over them at the very moment when the growing dissatisfaction in Rome was gathering to a head.^ It was the first occasion on which the provincials had suffered from Nero's rule, and the discontent it caused helped to weaken his hold over them at the very moment when the growing dissatisfaction in Rome was gathering to a head.

^ In 58, however, fresh cause for anxiety appeared, when Nero was enslaved by Poppaea Sabina, a woman of a very different stamp from her predecessor.

^ Rome Mint, NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS Laureate head right / Salus seated left, holding patera, SALVS in exergue.
  • Nero, Roman Imperial Coinage of, Thumbnail Index - WildWinds.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.wildwinds.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Early in 65 Nero was panic-stricken by the discovery of a formidable conspiracy involving such men as Faenius Rufus, Tigellinus's colleague in the prefecture of the praetorian guards, Plautius Lateranus, one of the consuls elect, the poet Lucan, and, lastly, not a few of the tribunes and centurions of the praetorian guard itself.^ Early in 65 Nero was panic-stricken by the discovery of a formidable conspiracy involving such men as Faenius Rufus, Tigellinus's colleague in the prefecture of the praetorian guards, Plautius Lateranus, one of the consuls elect, the poet Lucan , and, lastly, not a few of the tribunes and centurions of the praetorian guard itself.

^ Piso, the poet Lucan , the prefect Faenius Rufus and various Senators, Equestrians and Praetorian Guards were convicted of treason and executed.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

.Their chosen leader, whom they destined to succeed Nero, was C. Calpurnius Piso, a handsome, wealthy and popular noble, and a boon companion of Nero himself.^ Their chosen leader, whom they destined to succeed Nero, was C. Calpurnius Piso , a handsome, wealthy and popular noble, and a boon companion of Nero himself.

^ Then said Nero, "The Holy One—blessed be He!—has determined to destroy His Temple and then avenge Himself on the agent by whom its ruin is wrought."
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Jewish leaders, though, asked if they could go directly to Nero for arbitration.

.The plan to murder Nero was frustrated by a freedman Milichus, who, in the hope of a large reward, disclosed the whole plot.^ The plan to murder Nero was frustrated by a freedman Milichus, who, in the hope of a large reward, disclosed the whole plot.

^ Only 16, Nero was at first dominated by his mother Agrippina, who murdered or drove to suicide Nero's aunt Domitia Lepida, proconsul of Asia Iunius Silanus, and the freedman Narcissus.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero's father was described by Suetonius as a murderer and a cheat who was charged by emperor Tiberius with treason, adultery, and incest.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.^ Piso, Faenius Rufus, Lucan and many of their less prominent accomplices, and even Seneca himself (though there seems to have been no evidence of his complicity) were executed.

^ Of this there is no evidence whatsoever.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Piso, the poet Lucan , the prefect Faenius Rufus and various Senators, Equestrians and Praetorian Guards were convicted of treason and executed.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.But, though largesses and thanksgivings celebrated the suppression of the conspiracy, and the round of games and shows was renewed with even increased splendour, the effects of the shock were visible in the long list of victims who during the next few months were sacrificed to his restless fears and resentment.^ But, though largesses and thanksgivings celebrated the suppression of the conspiracy, and the round of games and shows was renewed with even increased splendour, the effects of the shock were visible in the long list of victims who during the next few months were sacrificed to his restless fears and resentment.

^ Nero's Marriage and the Burning of Rome Poppaea and Nero married in 62 A.D., and she bore a daughter to him the next year, but the child died only a few months later.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But I digress, under your list of celebrities who experimented with LSD, you’re missing one.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.Conspicuous among them was Paetus Thrasea, whose unbending virtue had long made him distasteful to Nero, and who was now suspected, possibly with reason, of sympathy with the conspirators.^ Conspicuous among them was Paetus Thrasea, whose unbending virtue had long made him distasteful to Nero, and who was now suspected, possibly with reason, of sympathy with the conspirators.

^ Finally, "Nero having butchered so many illustrious men, at last desired to exterminate virtue itself by the death of Thrasea Paetus and Barea Soranus" (Tacitus, Annals xvi.21).

^ And he said unto me: "So has it been since this world was made until now, and this war (will continue) till He, whom thou shalt see will come and destroy him."

.The death of Poppaea in the autumn of ' Tac.^ The death of Poppaea in the autumn of ' Tac.

Ann. xv. 38; Suet. .Nero, 38; Dio Cass.^ Nero, 19-24; Dio Cass.

^ Nero, 38; Dio Cass.

^ Nero, 40; Dio Cass.

lxii. 16; Pliny, N.H. xvii. 5.
.2 This work is a reply to C. Pascal's L'Incendio di Roma e i primi Cristiani (Milan, 1900), which throws the guilt on the Christians.^ This work is a reply to C. Pascal's L'Incendio di Roma e i primi Cristiani (Milan, 1900), which throws the guilt on the Christians.

Tac. Ann. xv. 42; Suet. .Nero, 31; cf.^ Nero, 31; cf.

.Friedlander, Sittengeschichte, iii.^ Friedlander, Sittengeschichte, iii.

.67-69.
65 was probably not lamented by any one but her husband, but the general gloom was deepened by a pestilence, caused, it seems, by the overcrowding at the time of the fire.^ In later times the idea of a twofold Antichrist seems to have arisen-one for the Jews and one for the Gentiles; compare especially Commodian, Carm.

^ He lamented that no one tries to delve into one's heart, but everyone seems to be watching the bag on the back of the person in front.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no time to lament for public disasters, when one has so many private sorrows to think of.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.Early, however, in the summer of 66, the Parthian prince Tiridates visited Italy.^ Early, however, in the summer of 66, the Parthian prince Tiridates visited Italy.

^ War and peace with Parthia Shortly after Nero's acession to the throne in 55, the Roman vassal kingdom of Armenia overthrew their prince Rhadamistus and he was replaced with the Parthian prince Tiridates.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This event was a conspicuous tribute to the ability both as soldier and statesman of Cn.^ This event was a conspicuous tribute to the ability both as soldier and statesman of Cn.

Domitius Corbulo. .As long ago as 54 the news reached Rome that the Parthian king Vologaeses had expelled the king recognized by Rome from Armenia and installed in his place his own brother Tiridates.^ Paetus was dismissed, and Corbulo negotiated a treaty recognizing as king of Armenia the Parthian Tiridates.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Parthian king Vologases I refused to remove his brother Tiridates from Armenia.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Parthians temporarily relinquished control of Armenia to Rome.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Orders were at once issued to concentrate all available forces on the Cappadocian frontier under Corbulo, the first soldier of his day.^ Orders were at once issued to concentrate all available forces on the Cappadocian frontier under Corbulo, the first soldier of his day.

^ First and beyond all else he had forced from his companions a promise to let no one have his head, but to contrive in some way that he be buried unmutilated.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Nero sent an army under consul Caesennius Paetus, but in 62 he foolishly surrendered his forces to the Parthians at Rhandeia even though Corbulo was nearby.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.After some time spent in making his army efficient, Corbulo invaded Armenia and swept victoriously through the country.^ After some time spent in making his army efficient, Corbulo invaded Armenia and swept victoriously through the country.

^ The Roman governor of Cappadocia, Paelignus, invaded Armenia and ravaged the country.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ As Vespasian's army invaded Galilee, many of the followers of Josephus fled, while some found shelter with him at Tiberias.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Armenia was rescued and Corbulo proposed that Tiridates should become king of Armenia on condition of his receiving his crown as a gift from Nero.^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The result was a deal where Tiridates again became the Armenian king, but was crowned in Rome by emperor Nero.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Casperius protested earnestly against the overthrow of an allied king and of Armenia, the gift of the Roman people, through iniquity and greed of gain.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.But the government in Rome had a plan of its own, and a certain Tigranes, long resident in Rome, but a stranger to the Armenians, was sent out, and Corbulo was obliged reluctantly to seat him on the Armenian throne.^ Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it.
  • End Time Prophecy - Revelation - Glossary of Symbols 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.northforest.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Being thrown out of his chariot, he was again replaced, but could not retain his seat, and was obliged to give up, before he reached the goal, but was crowned notwithstanding.

^ Rhadamistus might retain his ill-gotten gains, as long as he was hated and infamous; for this was more to Rome's interest than for him to have succeeded with glory."
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Tigranes's position, always insecure, soon became untenable, and it became necessary for Rome to intervene once more. .A Roman force under Caesennius Paetus was sent to restore Tigranes and re-establish Roman predominance.^ A Roman force under Caesennius Paetus was sent to restore Tigranes and re-establish Roman predominance.

^ (SSFC, 9/29/02, p.C11) 55BC Aug 26, Roman forces under Julius Caesar invaded Britain.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In Asia Roman general Domitius Corbulo captured and burned Artaxata and in 59 drove Tiridates out of Armenia, establishing Tigranes on the throne there.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Paetus, however, was no Corbulo.^ Paetus, however, was no Corbulo.

He was defeated, and Corbulo, now legate of Syria, was obliged to come to his rescue. The result was the final triumph of Corbulo's policy. .Tiridates agreed to accept the crown of Armenia from the hands of Nero.^ Tiridates agreed to accept the crown of Armenia from the hands of Nero.

^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ War and peace with Parthia Shortly after Nero's acession to the throne in 55, the Roman vassal kingdom of Armenia overthrew their prince Rhadamistus and he was replaced with the Parthian prince Tiridates.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In royal state he travelled to Italy, and the ceremony of investiture was performed at Rome with the utmost splendour.^ In royal state he travelled to Italy, and the ceremony of investiture was performed at Rome with the utmost splendour.

Delighted with this tribute to his greatness, Nero for a moment dreamt of rivalling Alexander. .Expeditions were talked of to the Caspian Sea and Ethiopia, but Nero was no soldier and quickly turned to a more congenial field.^ It surely is no mere coincidence that 616 is the numerical value of “Nero Caesar,” when spelled in Hebrew by transliterating it from its more widely familiar Latin spelling.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A disguised Nero and small group of supporters (probably numbering no more than four) headed out of Rome to contemplate their next move.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ NO MORE NERO for me!!!
  • Nero 9: Failed Installs, Bugs & Other Crazyness. - Official Nero Forum 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC forum.my.nero.com [Source type: General]

.He had already, in 64, appeared on the stage before the half-Greek public of Naples.^ He had already, in 64, appeared on the stage before the half-Greek public of Naples .

^ In 65 A.D. Nero's artistic inclinations, present since his accession, became truly public, and in a display which shocked conservative tastes he appeared on stage and sang for audiences.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.But his mind was now set on challenging the applause of the Greeks themselves in the ancient home of art.^ But his mind was now set on challenging the applause of the Greeks themselves in the ancient home of art.

Towards the end of 66 he arrived in Greece with a retinue of soldiers, courtiers, musicians and dancers. The spectacle presented by Nero's visit was unique. .4 He went professedly as an enthusiastic worshipper of Greek art and a humble candidate for the suffrages of Greek judges.^ He went professedly as an enthusiastic worshipper of Greek art and a humble candidate for the suffrages of Greek judges.

.At each of the great festivals, which to please him were for once crowded into a single year, he entered in regular form for the various competitions, scrupulously conformed to the tradition and rules of the arena, and awaited in nervous suspense the verdict of the umpires.^ At each of the great festivals, which to please him were for once crowded into a single year, he entered in regular form for the various competitions, scrupulously conformed to the tradition and rules of the arena , and awaited in nervous suspense the verdict of the umpires.

^ The heralds for the great festivals were selected by competition among the rival candidates.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Perchance also he will now enter into Rome; for yesterday they besought him with great acclamations, saying unto him: Thou art God in Italy, thou art the saviour of the Romans: haste quickly unto Rome.

.The dexterous Greeks humoured him to the top of his bent.^ The dexterous Greeks humoured him to the top of his bent.

^ Upon the top of one of his statues was placed the figure of a chariot with a Greek inscription, that "Now indeed he had a race to run; let him be gone."

.Everywhere the imperial competitor was victorious, and crowded audiences importuned him to display his talents.^ Everywhere the imperial competitor was victorious, and crowded audiences importuned him to display his talents.

.The emperor protested that only the Greeks were fit to hear him, and rewarded them when he left by the bestowal of immunity from the land tax on the whole province, and by the gift of the Roman franchise; he also planned and actually commenced the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth.^ The emperor protested that only the Greeks were fit to hear him, and rewarded them when he left by the bestowal of immunity from the land tax on the whole province, and by the gift of the Roman franchise ; he also planned and actually commenced the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth .

^ Marcellus their patron, and his house was called the house of the strangers and of the poor, and the emperor said unto him: I will keep thee out of every office, lest thou despoil the provinces to give gifts unto the Christians.

^ (ATC, p.24)(MC, 1/17/02) 395 Division of Roman Empire left lands presently inhabited by Albanians under the administration of the Eastern Empire.
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.If we may believe report, Nero found time in the intervals of his artistic triumphs for more vicious excesses.^ If we may believe report, Nero found time in the intervals of his artistic triumphs for more vicious excesses.

^ Matricide and consolidation of power Over time, Nero became progressively more powerful.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (AM, May/Jun 97 p.24) 3300BC German hikers Erica and Helmut Simon found a well-preserved prehistoric corpse, dated to about this time.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The stories of his mock marriage with Sporus, his execution of wealthy Greeks for the sake of their money, and his wholesale plundering of the temples were evidently part of the accepted tradition about him in the time of Suetonius, and are at least credible.^ Caligula gave the tetrarchies of Philip and Herod Antipas to his friend Herod Agrippa, who persuaded him to change the plans about his statue in the Jerusalem temple.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ During the Passover festival John's force of 6,000 treacherously attacked the Zealots to become master of the Temple, about 2,400 surviving Zealots joining him.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This Sporus he carried about with him in a litter round the solemn assemblies and fairs of Greece, and afterwards at Rome through the Sigillaria, dressed in the rich attire of an empress; kissing him from time to time as they rode together.

.Far more certainly true is his ungrateful treatment of Domitius Corbulo, who, when he landed at Cenchreae, fresh from his successes in Armenia, was met by an order for his instant execution and at once put an end to his life.^ More crucially, in his paranoia after the conspiracy he ordered a popular and successful general, Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo, to commit suicide, a decision which left other provincial leaders in doubt about his next move and inclined toward rebellion rather than inaction.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Triumphal distinctions were voted to Ostorius, who thus far had been successful, but soon afterwards met with reverses; either because, when Caractacus was out of the way, our discipline was relaxed under an impression that the war was ended, or because the enemy, out of compassion for so great a king, was more ardent in his thirst for vengeance.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ At once he bubbled up the ghost, and there was an end to that shadow of a life.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.Meanwhile the general dissatisfaction was coming to a head, as we may infer from the urgency with which the imperial freedman Helius insisted upon Nero's return to Italy.^ Galba, Otho and Vitellius were each briefly emperor until Nero's general Vespasian returned from Judea and restored order as emperor.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ John informs us that the seventh king was “not yet come.” That would be Galba, who assumed power upon Nero’s death in June, A.D. 68.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After public protests, Nero was forced to allow Octavia to return from exile,[38] but she was executed shortly upon her return.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Far more serious was the disaffection which now showed itself in the rich and warlike provinces of the west.^ It’s a problem when the show’s style relies on relentless winks and nudges at the expense of the ST universe being consistent or taking itself seriously.
  • TrekInk: Early Review of Star Trek: Nero #1 | TrekMovie.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC trekmovie.com [Source type: General]

.In northern Gaul, early in 68, the standard of revolt was raised by Julius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and himself the head of an ancient and noble Celtic family.^ Vindex's Rebellion In late 67 or early 68, Vindex, the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis in Gaul, rebelled against the tax policies of Nero.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Gaius Julius Vindex, the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis led an armed revolt against Nero.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the meantime the revolt of Vindex in Gaul commenced (68 A.D.), but it was soon quelled by Verginius Rufus on account of its national Gaulic character.

.South of the Pyrenees, P. Sulpicius Galba, governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, and Poppaea's former 4 Suet.^ Hispania Tarraconensis governor Servius Sulpicius Galba, having discovered Nero's secret orders for his assassination, changed his loyalty from Nero to the Senate and people of Rome and was supported by Lusitanian governor Otho and Baetica quaestor Caecina.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To gain support, Vindex called on Galba, the governor of Hispania Citerior in Spain, to become emperor.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Nero, 19-24; Dio Cass.^ As Dio says (62.24) "they desired at the same time to be rid of these evils and to give Nero his release from them.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ IPaddress.invalid> Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2010 09:24:19 +0000 Local: Wed, Jan 13 2010 4:24 am Subject: Re: Nero 9 Lite is junk...
  • Nero 9 Lite is junk... - alt.comp.freeware | Google Groups 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dio, 61.19 , Nero first shaved his beard in 59 A.D. at the age of twenty-one and commemorated the event by establishing the Juvenales ludi or Juvenalia (chap.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

Epit. lxiii. 8-16.
husband, .Marcus Salvius Otho, governor of Lusitania, followed Vindex's example.^ When Nero became involved with Poppaea Sabina, he had her husband Otho sent to Lusitania as governor.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Marcus Salvius Otho (36) committed the murder and forced the senate to recognize himself as emperor.
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.At first, however, fortune seemed to favour Nero.^ However Claudius might have died, he was to be remembered the right way and it set the tone for the first five years of Nero's reign.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.It is very probable that Vindex had other aims in view than the deposition of Nero and the substitution of a fresh emperor in his place, and that the liberation of northern Gaul from Roman rule was part of his plan.'^ The Talmud adds that the sage Reb Meir Baal HaNess, a prominent supporter of Bar Kokhba's rebellion against Roman rule, is a descendant of Nero.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero Wolfe, chapter 6 More than ninety-nine per cent of the bets placed on horse races are outbusts of emotion, not exercises of reason.
  • Nero Wolfe - Wikiquote 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ As Suetonius viewed the long months immediately following Nero’s death, the empire “for a longtime had been unsettled, and as it were, drifting, through the usurpation and violent death of three emperors.” .
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.If this was so, it is easy to understand both the enthusiasm with which the chiefs of northern Gaul rallied to the standard of a leader belonging to their own race, and the opposition which Vindex encountered from the Roman colony of Lugdunum and the legions on the Rhine.^ Vindex, it need hardly be observed, was the name of the propraetor who had set up the standard of rebellion in Gaul.

^ (MC, 9/19/01) 96CE Jul 1, Vespasian, a Roman Army leader, was hailed as a Roman Emperor by the Egyptian legions.
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For it is certain that the latter at any rate were not animated by loyalty to Nero. .Though they defeated Vindex and his Celtic levies at Vesontio (Besancon), their next step was to break the statues of Nero and offer the imperial purple to their own commander Virginius Rufus.^ Virginius Rufus defeated Vindex's forces and Vindex committed suicide.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However, the German legate Verginius Rufus defeated Vindex at Vesontio (Besançon), and Vindex committed suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.He declined their offer, but appealed to them to declare for the senate and people of Rome.^ BCE The Romans overthrew King Lucius Tarquinius and established a republic with rule by the senate and the people of Rome (SPQR - Senatus Populusque Romanus).
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^ The Senate declared Nero an enemy of Rome, and he was soon killed.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Galba declared his allegiance to the Senate and the Roman people, rather than to Nero.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.Meanwhile in Spain Galba had been saluted imperator by his legions, had accepted the title, and was already on his march towards Italy.^ Otho had declared himself emperor of Rome after he killed Galba, who had been acclaimed emperor by his legions in Spain.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On the road the news met him that Vindex had been crushed by the army of the Rhine, and for the moment he resolved to abandon his attempt.^ He also heard a traveller they met on the road, say, "They are in pursuit of Nero:" and another ask, "Is there any news in the city about Nero?"

.Meanwhile, Nero had reluctantly left Greece, but returned to Italy only to renew his revels.^ The prince had no sooner tasted it than he sunk on the floor, Nero meanwhile, pretending to the guests, that it was only a fit of the falling sickness, to which, he said, he was subject.

^ Nero was in Greece at the time and reacted slowly to his advisors pleas to return to Rome and act decisively.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.When on the 19th of March the news reached him at Naples of the rising in Gaul, he allowed a week to elapse before he could tear himself away from his pleasures, and then contented himself with proscribing Vindex, and setting a price on his head.^ According to Tacitus, this instability was rooted in the fact that emperors could no longer rely on the perceived legitimacy of the imperial bloodline, as Nero and those before him could.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Being thrown out of his chariot, he was again replaced, but could not retain his seat, and was obliged to give up, before he reached the goal, but was crowned notwithstanding.

^ Having reached a wall at the back of the villa, Phaon advised him to hide himself awhile in a sand-pit; when he replied, "I will not go under-ground alive."

.The revolts in Spain and Germany terrified him too late into something like energy.^ And I saw when He descended into the fifth heaven, that in the fifth heaven He made Himself like unto the form of the angels there, and they did not praise Him (nor worship Him); for His form was like unto theirs.

The senate almost openly intrigued against him, and the populace were silent or hostile. The fidelity of the praetorian sentinels even was more than doubtful. .When finally the palace guards forsook their posts, Nero despairingly stole out of Rome to seek shelter in a freedman's villa some four miles off.^ At Rome, he struck out the eye of a Roman knight in the Forum, only for some free language in a dispute between them.

^ Staying there some little time, while preparations were made for bringing him privately into the villa, he took up some water out of a neighbouring tank in his hand, to drink, saying, "This is Nero's distilled water."

^ Tacitus furnishes some interesting details of the circumstances under which the philosopher calmly submitted to his fate, which was announced to him when at supper with his friends, at his villa, near Rome.Tacitus, b.

.There he heard of the senate's proclamation of Galba as emperor, and of the sentence of death passed on himself.^ But he neither made any inquiry after the authors, nor when information was laid before the senate against some of them, would he allow a severe sentence to be passed.

^ Otho had declared himself emperor of Rome after he killed Galba, who had been acclaimed emperor by his legions in Spain.
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^ (PCh, 1992, p.37) 69 Galba was murdered by Otho who forced the senate to declare him emperor.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On the approach of the horsemen sent to drag him to execution, he collected sufficient courage to save himself by suicide.^ The horsemen who had received orders to bring him away alive, were now approaching the house.

^ They urged him to flee, but he prepared himself for suicide.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Josephus managed to hide and surrendered when Vespasian sent to him a friend, the historian giving himself a philosophical speech on why suicide is a bad idea.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.Nero died on the 9th of June 68, in the thirty-first year of his age and the fourteenth of his reign, and his remains were deposited by the faithful hands of Acte in the family tomb of the Domitii on the Pincian Hill.^ Nero Caesar died BEFORE AD 96 on June 9th, AD 68.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His nurses, Ecloge and Alexandra, with his concubine Acte, deposited his remains in the tomb belonging to the family of the Domitii, which stands upon the top of the Hill of the Gardens, and is to be seen from the Campus Martius.

^ Nero's interest in her waned whilst he was involved with Poppaea, but Acte's loyalty did not falter and following Nero's death, she carried his remains to his father's family tomb.
  • Nero@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

.With his death ended the line of the Caesars, and Roman imperialism entered upon a new phase.^ Indeed, in Tacitus’s estimationit very nearly was so: “This was the condition of the Roman state when Serius Galba, chosen consul for the second time, and his colleague Titus Vinius entered upon the year that was to be for Galba his last and for the state almost the end.” .
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was the Roman author of the Histories (begins with the death of Nero), and the Annals (begins with Tiberius' reign and goes to the end of Nero).
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Caesars ended with Nero.” This was a grave and serious matter to the Roman Empire.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His statues were broken, his name everywhere erased, and his golden house demolished; yet, in spite of all, no Roman emperor has left a deeper mark upon subsequent tradition.^ He describes this Wild Beast by no less than sixteen distinctive marks, and then all but tells us in so many words the name of the person whom it is intended to symbolize."
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And he raised me up into the sixth heaven, and there were no (angels) on the left, nor a throne in the midst, but all had one appearance and their (power of) praise was equal.

^ {See Rev 17:9} NOTE: There are many statues of the exact likeness of Nero Caesar including a 151 foot statue in the "Golden House" in Rome.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Roman populace for a long time reverenced his memory as that of an open-handed patron, and in Greece the recollections of his magnificence, and his enthusiasm for art, were still fresh when the traveller Pausanias visited the country a century later.^ Centuries later the Romans turned the quarries into cisterns and connected them with tunnels.
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^ Will take a very long time to win me over - in the hands of a corrupt government a chip like that makes me extremely vulnerable.
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ So still he tries, and still he fails; still searching long he lingers; And every time the tricksy things go slipping thro' his fingers.
  • Apocolocyntosis 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.The belief that he had not really died, but would return again to confound his foes, was long prevalent, not only in the remoter provinces, but even in Rome itself; and more than one pretender was able to collect a following by assuming the name of the last of the race of Augustus.^ Rome died, as it were, and returned again to life.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Nero Wolfe, chapter 6 More than ninety-nine per cent of the bets placed on horse races are outbusts of emotion, not exercises of reason.
  • Nero Wolfe - Wikiquote 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I was thinking the Real Thing would be better than the dong I use to keep in shape.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

.More lasting still was the implacable hatred of those who had suffered from his cruelties.^ XXXVI. Nor did he proceed with less cruelty against those who were not of his family.

^ Some of the featured groups I’m interviewing are those who have been run through the penal system (including those who are still in it.
  • Lettersto666 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.666ismoney.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His mother, Junia, was included in the accusation, as one who still resented the misfortune of exile which she had suffered in the past.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Roman literature, faithfully reflecting the sentiments of the aristocratic salons of the capital, while it almost canonized those who had been his victims, fully avenged their wrongs by painting Nero as a monster of wickedness.^ The emperor likewise widened the sacred precincts of the capital, in conformity with the ancient usage, according to which, those who had enlarged the empire were permitted also to extend the boundaries of Rome.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Those arguing for peace were the followers of Hillel who abhorred war, nobles benefiting from Roman rule, and the wealthy who feared revolutionary changes.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Seneca asks if this is just treatment; but Nero replies that justice is for those who have no need to fear.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.In Christian tradition he even appears as the mystic Antichrist, who was destined to come once again to trouble the saints.^ I JOHN 2:18: “Even now many antichrists have come.” Surely all who receive the mark of the Beast are antichrists.
  • AntiChrist » Blog Archive » Revelation 13:1 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.anti-christ.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The New Testament does not specify how or when Peter or Paul died, who the first persecutor of Christians was, or the identity of the Antichrist.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was he who first began a persecution; and I am not sure but he will be the last also to carry it on, if, indeed, we admit, as many are inclined to believe, that he will yet appear immediately before the coming of Antichrist.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

.Even in the middle ages, Nero was still the very incarnation of splendid iniquity, while the belief lingered obstinately that he had only disappeared for a time, and as late as the 11th century his restless spirit was supposed to haunt the slopes of the Pincian Hill.^ In 310, Lactantius wrote that Nero suddenly disappeared, and even the burial-place of that noxious wild beast was nowhere to be seen.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These "fidlers," formerly welcome, were considered in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance period as roisterers and idlers, and as active in spreading social unrest.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Permalink i like NERO very much.i used only nero in my system b’coz it runs very effectively.im the fan of nero.so provide nero advance versions plzzz.
  • Download Nero 9 Free Full Version Now 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.intowindows.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The chief ancient authorities for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus (Annals, xiii.-xvi., ed.^ He was the Roman author of the Histories (begins with the death of Nero), and the Annals (begins with Tiberius' reign and goes to the end of Nero).
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the reign of Nero, his general, Suetonius Paulinus, attacked Mona or Anglesey, the chief seat of the Druids, and extirpated them with great cruelty.

^ He entered his political life as a senator after Nero's death and, by Tacitus' own admission, owed much to Nero's rivals.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Furneaux), Suetonius, Dio Cassius (Epit. lxi., lxii., lxiii.^ These accounts follow the histories of Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio along with a number of early Christian writers.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Suetonius and Cassius Dio favor Nero as the arsonist.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Tacitus and Suetonius wrote their histories on Nero over fifty years after his death, while Cassius Dio wrote his history over 150 years after Nero’s death.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

), and Zonaras (Ann. xi.). .The most important modern work is that of B. W. Henderson, The Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero (London, 1903; see an important notice in 1 Suet.^ Date: 31 Jan 2009 Time: 04:47:04 Your Comments: nero!!!you are the most worst roman emperor....
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are other operas on the life and times of Nero, such as Handel's in 1705 and Rubinstein's in 1879, but I have not been able to examine these works.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Bernard W. Henderson, The Life and Principate of the Emperor Nero (Philadelphia: 1903) 239.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Nero, 40; Dio Cass. Epit. lxiii. 22; Plut. Galba, 4; cf. also Schiller's Nero, pp. 261 seq.; Mommsen in Hermes, xiii. 90.
Class. Rev. vol. xviii. p. .57), which contains complete bibliography of ancient and modern writers; see also H. Schiller's Nero, and Geschichte d.^ Thayer's Note: For comprehensive details and sources on the Baths of Nero, see the article Thermae Neronianae in Platner and Ashby's Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome.
  • Suetonius • Life of Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Gibbon, and in recent times especially Schiller ( Geschichte der Rmischen Kaiserzeit unter der Regierung des Nero, p.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In summary, Nero in various aspects of his career has fascinated writers and the general public throughout modern times.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Kaiserzeit;
Lehmann, Claudius and Nero; histories of Rome in general.^ In 66 Tiridates was ostentatiously crowned by Nero in Rome, and the same year he ordered his best general Corbulo to commit suicide.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The modern interpretation of "Nero fiddled while Rome burned" depends on the two general meanings of the word fiddle which were found fully developed in the seventeenth century.
  • "Nero Fiddled While Rome Burned" — Classical Journal 42:211‑217 (1947) 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC penelope.uchicago.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (HN, 3/18/99) 37CE Dec 15, Nero Claudius Caesar, emperor of Rome who is blamed for the great fire of Rome, was born.
  • Timeline Romans 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

(H. F. P.)


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


occurs only in the superscription (which is probably spurious, and is altogether omitted in the R.V.) to the Second Epistle to Timothy. .He became emperor of Rome when he was about seventeen years of age (A.D. 54), and soon began to exhibit the character of a cruel tyrant and heathen debauchee.^ At the age of sixteen I decided to move around, and in fourteen years I became acquainted with most of Europe, a little of Africa, and much of Asia, in a variety of roles and activities.
  • Nero Wolfe - Wikiquote 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ For as soon as she was sure of her marriage, she began to aim at greater things, and planned an alliance between Domitius, her son by Cneius Aenobarbus, and Octavia, the emperor's daughter.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Popular legend remembers Nero as a libertine and a tyrant; he is known as the emperor who "fiddled while Rome burned" and an early persecutor of Christians.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In May A.D. 64, a terrible conflagration broke out in Rome, which raged for six days and seven nights, and totally destroyed a great part of the city.^ XV. 39, that Nero was suspected to be the author of the great Roman conflagration, which took place in 64 a.d.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

^ XXXIII. Now Peter was in Rome rejoicing in the Lord with the brethren, and giving thanks night and day for the multitude which was brought daily unto the holy name by the grace of the Lord.

^ To mention only a few: Salvidienus Orfitus was accused of letting out three taverns attached to his house in the Forum to some cities for the use of their deputies at Rome.

The guilt of this fire was attached to him at the time, and the general verdict of history accuses him of the crime. "Hence, to suppress the rumour," says Tacitus (Annals, xv. .44), "he falsely charged with the guilt, and punished with the most exquisite tortures, the persons commonly called Christians, who are hated for their enormities.^ Tacitus described the event: Consequently, to get rid of the report, Nero fastened the guilt and inflicted the most exquisite tortures on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians by the populace.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Claudius, enraged by what he took as a grave charge, punished with banishment or death all his son's best instructors, and set persons appointed by his stepmother to have the care of him.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ At last he put her to death, upon a charge of adultery, so impudent and false, that, when all those who were put to the torture positively denied their knowledge of it, he suborned his pedagogue, Anicetus, to affirm, that he had secretly intrigued with and debauched her.

.Christus, the founder of that name, was put to death as a criminal by Pontius Pilate, procurator of Judea, in the reign of Tiberius; but the pernicious superstition, repressed for a time, broke out again, not only throughout Judea, where the mischief originated, but through the city of Rome also, whither all things horrible and disgraceful flow, from all quarters, as to a common receptacle, and where they are encouraged.^ Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome, where all things hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their centre and become popular.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Babylon is also completely FLAT whereas the End-Time “Babylon” will be a city built on 7 Hills JUST LIKE ROME!!
  • AntiChrist » Blog Archive » Revelation 13:1 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.anti-christ.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At Rome, he struck out the eye of a Roman knight in the Forum, only for some free language in a dispute between them.

.Accordingly, first three were seized, who confessed they were Christians.^ This obscure hint pointed to the people of Chalcedon, who, though they arrived there first and saw before others the advantageous position, chose the worse.
  • Tacitus - ANNALS 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC mcadams.posc.mu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ For the first, second, and third of the Aenobarbi had the praenomen of Lucius, and again the three following, successively, that of Cneius, while those who came after were called, by turns, one, Lucius, and the other, Cneius.

^ The New Testament does not specify how or when Peter or Paul died, who the first persecutor of Christians was, or the identity of the Antichrist.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Next, on their information, a vast multitude were convicted, not so much on the charge of burning the city as of hating the human race.^ Accordingly, an arrest was first made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Because it causes numerous crimes and wars, no plague has harmed the human race as much.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

.And in their deaths they were also made the subjects of sport; for they were covered with the hides of wild beasts and worried to death by dogs, or nailed to crosses, or set fire to, and, when day declined, burned to serve for nocturnal lights.^ Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These sources contradict on a number of events in Nero’s life including the death of Claudius, the death of Agrippina and the Roman fire of 64, but they are consistent in their condemnation of Nero.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ THEY {Nero Caesar and the False Prophet} were given power over a fourth of the earth to kill by sword, famine and plague, and by the wild beasts of the earth.
  • Obama's Fascinating Interview with Cathleen Falsani - Steven Waldman 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC blog.beliefnet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Surprise: People Don't Want To Be Implanted With RFID Chips | Techdirt 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC techdirt.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Nero offered his own gardens for that spectacle, and exhibited a Circensian game, indiscriminately mingling with the common people in the habit of a charioteer, or else standing in his chariot; whence a feeling of compassion arose toward the sufferers, though guilty and deserving to be made examples of by capital punishment, because they seemed not to be cut off for the public good, but victims to the ferocity of one man."^ To expect punishment is to suffer it, and to deserve it is to expect it.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I've always stayed away from Nero's stuff but after a while one gets tired of trying to find a really good, complete program.
  • Nero 9 Lite is junk... - alt.comp.freeware | Google Groups 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ VIII. When the death of Claudius [ 54 C.E. ] was made public, Nero, who was seventeen years old, went forth to the watch between the sixth and seventh hour, since no earlier time for the formal beginning of his reign seemed suitable because of bad omens throughout the day.
  • Ancient History Sourcebook: Suetonius: De Vita Caesarum--Nero, c. 110 C.E. 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.fordham.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Another Roman historian, Suetonius (Nero, xvi.^ Roman historian Suetonius writes in Nero (ch.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At first Romans were delighted with Caligula's recovery; but then his behavior became monstrous for its atrocities according to historians such as Suetonius.
  • Roman Decadence 37-96 by Sanderson Beck 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Ancient Sources: Tacitus, Annales, Books 13-16; Suetonius, Nero; Dio Cassius, Roman History, Books 61-63; cf.
  • Emperor Nero, The Beast  |  Study Archive  28 January 2010 0:33 UTC preteristarchive.com [Source type: Original source]

), says of him: "He likewise inflicted punishments on the Christians, a sort of people who hold a new and impious superstition" (Forbes's Footsteps of St. Paul, p. 60).
.Nero was the emperor before whom Paul was brought on his first imprisonment at Rome, and the apostle is supposed to have suffered martyrdom during this persecution.^ This is surely Nero, the sixth emperor of Rome.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Flavius Josephus, the Jewish contemporary of John, clearly points out that Julius Caesar was the first emperor of Rome and that he was followed in succession by Augustus, Tiberius, Caius, Claudius, and, sixthly, Nero (Antiquities, books 18 and 19).
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ According to Tacitus, this instability was rooted in the fact that emperors could no longer rely on the perceived legitimacy of the imperial bloodline, as Nero and those before him could.
  • Flickr: The Emperor Nero 28 January 2010 0:33 UTC www.flickr.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He is repeatedly alluded to in Scripture (Acts 25:11; Phil 1:12, 13; 4:22).^ This term also occurs in Revelation 2:16; 3:11; and 22:6, 7, 12, 20.
  • The Beast of Revelation Identified — The Beast of Revelation: Identified (DVD) 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC www.forerunner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (WSJ, 11/2/95, p.A-12)(MC, 1/25/02) 1817 Nov 8, Andrea Appiana (63), Italian royal painter of Napoleon, died.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (WSJ, 12/13/96, p.B11A) 1804 Apr 22, Gioacchino Rossini (12) performed in Imola.
  • Timeline Italy 15 September 2009 23:41 UTC timelines.ws [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He died A.D. 68.
This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.
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Simple English

Nero
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Bust of Nero
Reign 13 October, AD 54 – 9 June, AD 68
Full name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
(from birth to AD 50);
Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus (from 50 to accession);
Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (as emperor)
Born 15 December 37(37-12-15)
Birthplace Antium
Died June 9, 68 (aged 30)
Place of death Outside Rome
Buried Mausoleum of the Domitii Ahenobarbi, Pincian Hill, Rome
Predecessor Claudius
Successor Galba
Wives Claudia Octavia
Poppaea Sabina
Statilia Messalina
Offspring Claudia Augusta
Dynasty Julio-Claudian
Father Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
Mother Agrippina the Younger

Nero (Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, 15 December 37 AD – 9 June 68),[1] was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Nero was the adopted son of his grand-uncle Claudius. He became emperor on 13 October 54, after Claudius died. Claudius was probably assassinated by Nero's mother Agrippina the Younger. Agrippina had motive in ensuring the succession of Nero before Britannicus (Claudius' natural son) could gain power.[2]

Contents

Nero as Emperor

During his reign, Nero focused much of his attention on diplomacy, trade, and increasing the cultural capital of the empire. He ordered the building of theatres and promoted athletic games.

His reign included a successful war and negotiated peace with the Parthian Empire, the suppression of a revolt in Britain, and the beginning of the First Roman–Jewish War.

In 64, most of Rome was destroyed in the Great Fire of Rome. In 68, the rebellion of Vindex in Gaul and later the acclamation of Galba in Hispania (Spain) drove Nero from the throne. Facing assassination, he committed suicide on 9 June 68.[3]

Nero's rule is often associated with tyranny and extravagance.[4] He is known for a number of executions, including those of his mother[5] and stepbrother.

Nero is known as the emperor who played a fiddle while Rome burned, but actually he played the lyre and sang.[6] He also persecuted Christians. However, some ancient sources show that Nero was popular with the common people during and after his reign.

Footnotes

  1. born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
  2. Levick, Barbara. 1990. Claudius. Yale University Press. New Haven. p194
  3. Suetonius states that Nero committed suicide in Suetonius: The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 49; Sulpicius Severus, who possibly used Tacitus' lost fragments as a source, reports that it is uncertain whether Nero committed suicide: Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.29, also see T.D. Barnes, "The Fragments of Tacitus' Histories", Classical Philology (1977), p. 228.
  4. Galba, during his rebellion, criticized Nero's luxuria, both his public and private excessive spending: Tacitus, Annals I.16; Kragelund, Patrick, "Nero's Luxuria, in Tacitus and in the Octavia", The Classical Quarterly, 2000, pp. 494–515.
  5. References to Nero's matricide appear in the Sibylline Oracles 5.490–520, Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales The Monk's Tale, and William Shakespeare's Hamlet 3.ii.
  6. Nero was not a fiddle player, but a lyre player. Suetonius claims Nero played the lyre while Rome burned, see Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 38; For a detailed explanation of this transition see M.F. Gyles "Nero Fiddled while Rome Burned", The Classical Journal (1948), p. 211-217 [1]

Main sources

Other sources

References

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
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  1. born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
  2. Levick, Barbara. 1990. Claudius. Yale University Press. New Haven. p194
  3. Suetonius states that Nero committed suicide in Suetonius: The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 49; Sulpicius Severus, who possibly used Tacitus' lost fragments as a source, reports that it is uncertain whether Nero committed suicide: Sulpicius Severus, Chronica II.29, also see T.D. Barnes, "The Fragments of Tacitus' Histories", Classical Philology (1977), p. 228.
  4. Galba, during his rebellion, criticized Nero's luxuria, both his public and private excessive spending: Tacitus, Annals I.16; Kragelund, Patrick, "Nero's Luxuria, in Tacitus and in the Octavia", The Classical Quarterly, 2000, pp. 494–515.
  5. References to Nero's matricide appear in the Sibylline Oracles 5.490–520, Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales The Monk's Tale, and William Shakespeare's Hamlet 3.ii.
  6. Nero was not a fiddle player, but a lyre player. Suetonius claims Nero played the lyre while Rome burned, see Suetonius, The Lives of Twelve Caesars, Life of Nero 38; For a detailed explanation of this transition see M.F. Gyles "Nero Fiddled while Rome Burned", The Classical Journal (1948), p. 211-217 [1]



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