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Netherlands Antillean guilder
Antilliaanse gulden (Dutch)
Modern 10 guilder bill, in circulation 2009 Modern 100 guilder bill, in circulation 2009
Modern 10 guilder bill, in circulation 2009 Modern 100 guilder bill, in circulation 2009
ISO 4217 Code ANG
User(s)  Netherlands Antilles (Netherlands)
Inflation 3.6%
Source Bank van de Nederlandse Antillen, 2006 Q1
Method CPI
Pegged with U.S. dollar = ƒ1.79
Subunit
1/100 cent
Symbol NAƒ, NAf, ƒ, or f
Plural guilders
cent cents
Coins 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 cent, ƒ1, ƒ2½, ƒ5
Banknotes
Freq. used ƒ10, ƒ25, ƒ50, ƒ100
Rarely used ƒ5, ƒ250
Central bank Bank van de Nederlandse Antillen
Website www.centralbank.an
Printer Joh. Enschedé
Website www.joh-enschede.nl

The guilder (Dutch: gulden) is the currency of the Netherlands Antilles. It is subdivided into 100 cents (Dutch plural form: centen).

Contents

Naming

In the local language of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, Papiamentu, the guilder is called a "florin"[1]. The ISO-4217 code, ANG, is derived from ANtilleaanse Gulden, while the currency symbol, NAFl, is derived from Netherlands Antilles Florin.

History

In the 18th century, the Dutch guilder circulated in the Netherlands Antilles. This was supplemented in 1794 by an issue of coins specific for the Dutch holdings in the West Indies. At this time, the guilder was subdivided into 20 stuiver.

Between 1799 and 1828, the reaal circulated on the islands, with 1 reaal = 6 stuiver or 3⅓ reaal = 1 guilder. The Dutch guilder was reintroduced in 1828, now subdivided into 100 cents. When currency began once more to be issued specifically for use in the Netherlands Antilles, it was issued in the name of Curaçao, with the first banknotes and coins, denominated in the Dutch currency, introduced in 1892 and 1900, respectively. The name "Netherlands Antilles" (Nederlandse Antillen) was introduced in 1952.

In 1940, following the German occupation of the Netherlands, the link to the Dutch currency was broken, with a peg to the U.S. dollar of 1.88585 guilders = 1 dollar established. The peg was adjusted to 1.79 guilders = 1 dollar in 1971.

In 1986, Aruba gained a status aparte and thereby left the Netherlands Antilles. Shortly after that, Aruba began to issue its own currency, the Aruban florin, which replaced the Netherlands Antillean guilder at par.

With the planned dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles on October 10, 2010, the future of this currency is uncertain. It will probably (around 2011) point be replaced by the US Dollar.

Coins

In 1794, silver coins were issued for use in the Dutch West Indies in denominations of 2 stuiver, ¼, 1 and 3 guilders. After the reintroduction of the Dutch guilder in 1828, some 1 guilder coins were cut into quarters and stamped with a "C" in 1838 to produced ¼ guilder coins.

In 1900 and 1901, silver 110 and ¼ guilder coins were introduced which circulated alongside Dutch coins. Following the separation of the Netherlands Antillean currency from the Dutch, a bronze 1 cent coin was introduced in 1942, followed by a cupro-nickel 5-cent coin in 1943. Bronze 2½ cent and silver 1 and 2½ guilders were introduced in 1944. The alternate Dutch names for some of these coins are: 5 cent--stuiver; 10 cent--dubbeltje; 25 cent--kwartje; and 2½ guilders--rijksdaalder.

From 1952, the name "Nederlandse Antillen" appeared on the coins. In 1970, nickel replaced silver, although the 2½ guilder coin was not reintroduced until 1978. Aluminium 1 and 2½ cents were introduced in 1979. In 1989, aluminium 5 cent, nickel-bonded-steel 10, 25 and 50 cents, and aureate-steel 1 and 2½ guilders were introduced. Aureate-steel 5 guilder coins followed in 1998.

Na5guilder.png Na5guilderobverse.png The five guilder coin is produced from aureate steel. The spots on the obverse are the result of corrosion, and are not a typical feature of the coin. Octagonal ridges are built into the face to help distinguish it from the similar one guilder coin. The face features Beatrix of the Netherlands, while the obverse has the coat of arms of the Netherlands Antilles.
Na1guilder.png Na1guilderobverse.png The one guilder coin is produced from aureate steel. The face features Beatrix of the Netherlands, while the obverse has the coat of arms of the Netherlands Antilles.
Na50cent.png Na50centobverse.png The 50 cent coin is diamond shaped. It is the only modern Antillean coin in this form, but an earlier version of the five cent piece was also in this shape.

Banknotes

In 1892, the Curaçaosche Bank introduced notes in denominations of 25 and 50 cents, 1 and 2½ guilders. This was the only issue of the cent denominations. Notes for 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 guilders followed in 1900. The 1 and 2½ guilder notes were suspended after 1920 but reintroduced by the government in 1942 as muntbiljet.

From 1954, the name "Nederlandse Antillen" appeared on the reverse of the notes of the Curaçaosche Bank and, from 1955, the muntbiljet (2½ guilders only) was issued in the name of the Nederlandse Antillen. In 1962, the bank's name was changed to the Bank van de Nederlandse Antillen. In 1970, a final issue of muntbiljet was made in denominations of both 1 and 2½ guilders. The 500 guilder note was not issued after 1962.

Netherlands Antilles 10 gulden bill.jpg 25NAFl.jpg 50NAFl.jpg 100NAFl.jpg
The 10 guilder bill is illustrated with a kolibrie. Security features include a surface foil tag, an embedded hologram under the hummingbird, and an orange moire pattern contrasting with the green bill. The 25 guilder bill is illustrated with a flamingo. Security features include a surface foil tag, an embedded hologram under the flamingo, and a green moire pattern contrasting with the pink bill. The 50 guilder bill has an Andes mus on the face. Security features include a surface foil tag, an embedded hologram under the mus, and a green moire pattern contrasting with the orange bill. The 100 guilder bill has a suikerdiefje on the face. Security features include a surface foil tag, an embedded hologram under the suikerdiefje, and a green moire pattern contrasting with the brown bill.
Current ANG exchange rates
From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From XE.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From OANDA.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD

See also

References

  1. ^ Ratzlaff, Betty. Papiamentu/Ingles Dikshonario, second print, pg. 81, ISBN 99904-0-030-X

External links








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