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Coordinates: 46°59′36″N 3°09′26″E / 46.99333°N 3.15722°E / 46.99333; 3.15722

Commune of Nevers

Place de la repulique nevers.JPG
Place de la République in Nevers
Location
Nevers is located in France
Nevers
Administration
Country France
Region Bourgogne
Department Nièvre
Arrondissement Nevers
Intercommunality Nevers
Mayor Didier Boulaud
(2008–2014)
Statistics
Elevation 167–238 m (550–780 ft)
(avg. 180 m/590 ft)
Land area1 17.33 km2 (6.69 sq mi)
Population2 43,082  (2004)
 - Density 2,486 /km2 (6,440 /sq mi)
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 58194/ 58000
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.
Palais Ducal

Nevers (Latin: Noviodunum, later Nevirnum and Nebirnum) is a commune in the Nièvre department in the Bourgogne region in central France.

It is the principal city of the former province of Nivernais. Nevers is located 260 km (160 mi) SSE of Paris.

Contents

History

Nevers first enters written history as Noviodunum, a town held by the Aedui at Roman contact. The quantities of medals and other Roman antiquities found on the site indicate the importance of the place, and in 52 BCE, Julius Caesar made Noviodunum, which he describes as in a convenient position on the banks of the Loire, a depot (B. G. vii. 55). There he had his hostages, corn, his military chest, with the money in it allowed him from home for the war, his own and his army's baggage, and a great number of horses which had been bought for him in Spain and Italy. After his failure before Gergovia, the Aedui at Noviodunum massacred those who were there to look after stores, the negotiatores, and the travellers who were in the place. They divided the money and the horses among themselves, carried off in boats all the corn that they could, and burnt the rest or threw it into the river. Thinking they could not hold the town, they burnt it. This was a great loss to Caesar; and it may seem that he was imprudent in leaving such great stores in the power of treacherous allies. But he was in straits during this year, and probably he could not do otherwise than he did. Dio Cassius (xl. 38) tells the story out of Caesar of the affair of Noviodunum. He states incorrectly what Caesar did on the occasion, and he shows that he neither understood his original nor knew what he was writing about.

The city's name was later called Nevirnum, as the name appears in the Antonine Itinerary. In the Tabula Peutingeriana, it is corrupted into Ebrinum. In still other sources the name appears as Nebirnum.

It became the seat of a bishopric at the end of the 5th century. The county dates at least from the beginning of the 10th century. The citizens of Nevers obtained charters in 1194 and in 1231. For a short time in the 14th century the town was the seat of a university, transferred from Orléans, to which it was restored.

Geography

Nevers is situated on the slope of a hill on the right bank of the Loire River.

Main sights

Narrow winding streets lead from the quay through the town where there are numerous old houses of the 14th to the 17th centuries.

Among the ecclesiastical buildings the most important is the Cathédrale of Saint Cyr-Sainte Julitte, dedicated to Saint Quiricus and Saint Julietta, which is a combination of two buildings, and possesses two apses. The apse and transept at the west end are the remains of a Romanesque church, while the nave and eastern apse are in the Gothic style and belong to the 14th century. There is no transept at the eastern end. The lateral portal on the south side belongs to the late 15th century; the massive and elaborately decorated tower which rises beside it to the early 16th century.

The church of Saint Etienne is a specimen of the Romanesque style of Auvergne of which the disposition of the apse with its three radiating chapels is characteristic. It was consecrated at the close of the 9th century, and belonged to a priory affiliated to Cluny.

The Ducal Palace (now occupied by the courts of justice and an important ceramic museum) was built in the 15th and 16th centuries and is one of the principal feudal edifices in central France. The facade is flanked at each end by a turret and a round tower. A middle tower containing the great staircase has its windows adorned by sculptures relating to the history of the house of Cleves by the members of which the greater part of the palace was built.

In front of the palace lies an open space with a fine view over the valley of the Loire. The Porte du Croux, a square tower, with corner turrets, dating from the end of the 14th century, is among the remnants of the old fortifications; it now contains a collection of sculptures and Roman antiquities.

A triumphal arch from the eighteenth century, commemorating the victory of Fontenoy and the hotel de ville, a modern building which contains the library, are of some interest. The Loire is crossed by a modern stone bridge, and by an iron railway bridge.

At the Chapel of Saint Bernadette at the mother house of the Sisters of Charity in Nevers, it is possible to view the preserved remains of Bernadette Soubirous (Saint Bernadette) which are presented in a gold and crystal reliquary.

Economy

Nevers is the seat of a bishopric, of tribunals of first instance and of commerce and of a court of assizes and has a chamber of commerce and a branch of the Bank of France. Its educational institutions include a lycee, a training college for female teachers, ecclesiastical seminaries and a school of art. The town manufactures porcelain, agricultural implements, chemical manures, glue, boilers and iron goods, boots and shoes and fur garments, and has distilleries, tanneries and dye-works. Its trade is in iron and steel, wood, wine, grain, live-stock, &c. Hydraulic lime, kaolin and clay for the manufacture of faience are worked in the vicinity.

Demographics

At the 1999 census, the population was 40,932.

Notable people

Nevers was the birthplace of Pierre Gaspard Chaumette, revolutionary. Pierre Bérégovoy once Prime Minister of France committed suicide on 1 May 1993 in Nevers.

Culture

Nevers Rugby Club in 1900

The Formula One circuit of Magny-Cours is located near Nevers.

The anonymous French actress (Emmanuelle Riva) who is the main character in the film Hiroshima Mon Amour by Alain Resnais is from Nevers, and the film features many flashbacks to her youth there during World War II. In the final scene of the film, her Japanese lover tells her "You are Nevers". There is a lot of play on the English translation of the town's name throughout the film, with dialogue such as "Nevers? Jamais!" ("Nevers? Never!")

You can see locations of Nevers in Conte d'hiver (A Tale of Winter), the 1992 French film directed by Éric Rohmer.

American indie rock band The Fiery Furnaces wrote a song entitled "Nevers".

Twin towns

Nevers is twinned with:

See also

References

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents

Nevers is a town in Nièvre.

Get in

By train from Paris Gare du Lyon or from Paris-Bercy. The service from Gare du Lyon is a direct non-stop train and the journey takes almost 2 hours. In 2009, the fare for second class return journey is approximately 65 Euros. The service is operated by Corail Téoz, a super-smart train on the Paris to Nevers route to Clermont-Ferrand. This has all sorts of luxuries from a children’s play area to leather seats and points for the laptop in first class. For security reasons, the precise platform number at Gare du Lyon is not announced until approximately 10 minutes before the scheduled departure time.

The Nevers train station is located on Rue Saint Charleville, from where there are local train services to Vauzelles, Les Perrièrs and Le Banlay. Located just adjacent to the train station is the bus station.

By car, the 230 km journey from Paris would take about 2 hours. The road journey commences from Paris on the A6. Then at Le Puy join the A77 going south. Nearer to Nevers exit the A77 near Vernuche and take the D907 which brings you into Nevers.

Get around

Nevers is located on slight hilly terrain on the northern bank of the Loire River. The town centered around Place Carnot is quite walkable. Within a radius of approximately 1 kilometre are some of the main places of interest.

See

The incorrupt body of Sainte Bernadette rests here enshrined since 1925 in a glass and bronze casket at the chapel of the convent church of St Gildard at Nevers. The church is runned by the Sisters of Charity of Nevers and is located at Espace Bernadette 34 Rue Saint-Gildard. The visit to Nevers is recommended as a natural follow-up to the pilgrimage to Lourdes in southern France. Here there is a replica of the Grotto of Massabielle, where Bernadette saw the 18 Apparitions of Mother Mary. After the Apparitions in Lourdes in 1858, Bernadette Soubirous joined the Congregation of the Sisters of Charity of Nevers in 1866. She lived there until her death. Finally, a museum retraces the Saint’s life amongst the Congrégation des Soeurs de la Charité de Nevers. The Espace Bernadette can be contacted at +33 3 86 71 99 50 and by email ebsn@wanadoo.fr

Opening times for Espace Bernadette: From November to March from 7.30am to 12pm and from 2pm to 6pm. From April to October from 7am to 12.30pm and from 1.30pm to 7.30pm. Masses: In French every day at 11.30am; Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8am; Sundays at 10am. Mass in other languages are available upon request.

Some 500 meters from Rue Saint-Gildard is Place Carnot. This is the centre of the town where the nearby attractions are 17th century Baroque Sainte-Marie chapel and the 15th century Palais Ducal, the latter of which claims to be the earliest Loire chateau, with its stone carved Renaissance façade and octagonal turrets. The chapelle Sainte Marie, built during the first half of the 17th century, is the only remaining part of the former Couvent des Visitandines. You can’t visit the building’s interior but you will certainly be both fascinated and surprised by its extraordinary Baroque-style façade, which is unique in the Nevers region. The Palais ducal was the home of the Counts and Dukes of Nevers. It was at the initiative of Jean de Clamecy, who was looking to affirm his power, that the building was constructed around 1460. The architecture is inspired by the Gothic style of the Renaissance period as can be seen in the symmetry and regular lines of the façade, and in the decoration of the dormer windows.

Near to the Palais Ducal, the highest point of the Nevers town centre is the Cathédrale de Saint-Cyr Sainte Julitte, built between the 10th to the 16th centuries. Its oldest feature, the remains of a 6th century baptistery, was only found in 1944, after it was revealed by heavy bombing in World War II. The blown out windows have now been replaced by stunning modern stained glass.

The town itself is quite pictureque especially if viewed from the bridge across the Loire River, the longest river in France.

  • Pottery

Since the 16th century, Nevers has constantly been producing high-fired pottery. This technique, which originated in Italy, involves firing pieces twice, at 980° and then at 940°. The results are remarkable!

The main drawback of the high-firing technique is the limited number of colours. Only blue, green, ochre and black are resistant to it. This is where the originality and renown of Nevers pottery originates from. Pottery sells abroad and even today, visitors come here to buy Nevers’ Blue Gold.

  • Nougat

Wrapped in an orange-coloured fondant envelop, the Impérial Nougatine nougat has a crunchy almond and sugar centre. The Nougatine de Nevers was dreamed up over a century ago by Jean-Louis Bourumeau. The sweet earned its reputation as a result of the Empress Eugénie’s sweet-tooth.

Indeed, in 1862, when Napoleon was staying in Nevers, his majestic wife fell under the spell of these sweets. Upon returning to Paris, she placed a large order to allow others to share her delicious discovery.

Today this gastronomic tradition is perpetuated by the pâtisserie Edé, which holds the trade secret.

  • Roi Négus

Created in 1902 to commemorate the visit of the King of Ethiopia, the Négus is a soft caramel sweet, which is either chocolate or coffee flavoured, and which is covered in sugar. This amber-coloured sweet is manufactured in the traditional manner by the Confiserie Lyron, which has held the trademark since 1909.

  • Wine

Drink in moderation but don’t miss the Pouilly Fumé, a dry wine with a strange name, which will enchant wine-buffs with its very fruity taste. Also worth mentioning are the Coteaux Charitois or Giennois, which are other Ligerian wines with growing reputations.

  • Château de Nyon, [1]. Traditional château with bed and breakfast.  edit
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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

NEVERS, a town of central France, capital of the department of Nievre, 159 m. S.S.E. of Paris by the Paris-Lyons-Mediterranee railway to Nimes. Pop. (1906) 23,561. Nevers is situated on the slope of a hill on the right bank of the Loire at its confluence with the Nievre. Narrow winding streets lead from the quay through the town where there are numerous old houses of the 14th to the 17th centuries. Among the ecclesiastical buildings the most important is the cathedral of St Cyr, which is a combination of two buildings, and possesses two apses. The apse and transept at the west end are the remains of a Romanesque church, while the nave and eastern apse are in the Gothic style and belong to the 14th century. There is no transept at the eastern end. The lateral portal on the south side belongs to the late 15th century; the massive and elaborately decorated tower which rises beside it to the early 16th century. The church of St Etienne is a specimen of the Romanesque style of Auvergne of which the disposition of the apse with its three radiating chapels is characteristic. It was consecrated at the close of the 11th century, and belonged to a priory affiliated to Cluny. The ducal palace at Nevers (now occupied by the courts of justice and an important ceramic museum) was built in the 15th and 16th centuries and is one of the principal feudal edifices in central France. The facade is flanked at each end by a turret and a round tower. A middle tower containing the great staircase has its windows adorned by sculptures relating to the history of the house of Cleves by the members of which the greater part of the palace was built. In front of the palace lies a wide open space with a fine view over the valley of the Loire. The Porte du Croux, a square tower, with corner turrets, dating from the end of the 14th century, is among the remnants of the old fortifications; it now contains a collection of sculptures and Roman antiquities. A triumphal arch of the 18th century, commemorating the victory of Fontenoy and the hotel de ville, a modern building which contains the library, are of some interest. The Loire is crossed by a modern stone bridge, and by an iron railway bridge. Nevers is the seat of a bishopric, of tribunals of first instance and of commerce and of a court of assizes and has a chamber of commerce and a branch of the Bank of France. Its educational institutions include a lycee, a training college for female teachers, ecclesiastical seminaries and a school of art. The town manufactures porcelain, agricultural implements, chemical manures, glue, boilers and iron goods, boots and shoes and fur garments, and has distilleries, tanneries and dye-works. Its trade is in iron and steel, wood, wine, grain, live-stock, &c. Hydraulic lime, kaolin and clay for the manufacture of faience are worked in the vicinity.

Noviodunum, the early name of Nevers was in later times altered to Nebirnum. The quantities of medals and other Roman antiquities found on the site indicate the importance of the place at the time when Caesar chose it as a military depot for corn, money and hostages. In 52 B.C. it was the first place seized by the revolting Aedui. It became the seat of a bishopric at the end of the 5th century. The countship (see below) dates at least from the beginning of the loth century. The citizens of Nevers obtained charters in 1194 and in 1231. For a short time in the 14th century the town was the seat of a university, transferred from Orleans, to which it was restored.

Counts And Dukes Of Nevers. Having formed part of the duchy of Burgundy, the county of Nevers (Nivernais) was given by Duke Henry I. in 987 to his stepson, Otto William, afterwards count of Macon, who five years later handed it over to his son-in-law Landri. The first house of the hereditary counts of Nevers originated in this Landri, and was brought to an end in 1192 by the death of Agnes, countess of Nevers, wife of Pierre de Courtenay (d. 1217). The county subsequently passed by successive marriages into the houses of Donzy, Chatillon and Bourbon. Mahaut de Bourbon brought the county of Nevers, together with those of Auxerre and Tonnerre, to her husband Odo (Eudes), son of Hugh IV., duke of Burgundy, in 1248. Her eldest daughter, Yoland, received the county of Nevers as her dowry when in 1265 she married Jean Tristan, son of King Louis IX. She became a widow in 1270, and in 1272 married Robert de Dampierre, who became count of Flanders. Her descendant by her second marriage, Marguerite, daughter and heiress of Louis II. de Male, count of Flanders, married successively two dukes of Burgundy, Philip I. de Rouvre and Philip II. the Bold. Philip (d. 1415), the third son of Philip the Bold, received the counties of Nevers and of Rethel and the barony of Donzy; his last male descendant, John, died in 1491. The house of Cleves then inherited the Nivernais, which was erected into a duchy by King Francis I. for Francis of Cleves in 1 539. In 1565 Louis de Gonzaga (d. 1595), son of Frederick II., duke of Mantua, married Henrietta of Cleves, duchess of Nevers, and one of his descendants, Charles (d. 1665), sold the Nivernais to Cardinal Mazarin in 1659. The cardinal devised it to his nephew Philippe Jules Mancini, whose descendants possessed it until the French Revolution. The last duke of Nivernais, Louis Jules Barbon Mancini Mazarini, died in 1798.


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