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New Jersey's 5th congressional district: Wikis

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New Jersey's 5th congressional district
NJ05congressdistrict.gif
Current Representative Scott Garrett (R)
Population (2000) 647,258
Median income $72,781
Ethnicity 89.3% White, 1.5% Black, 6.6% Asian, 4.5% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% other
Cook PVI R+7

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Scott Garrett. Garrett defeated Democrat Paul Aronsohn and independent candidate R. Matthew Fretz 55%-44% in the United States general elections, 2006.[1]

Garrett is a conservative member of the U.S. House of Representatives, especially on social and economic issues. He draws support from the Club for Growth, among others.

In the 2008 race, Scott Garrett beat back a challenge from his opponent Dennis Shulman.

Contents

Counties and municipalities in the district

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is predominantly rural, with some suburban areas closer to New York City. The district is an L-shaped district comprising the rural northern and western parts of New Jersey. A portion of the district is in suburban northern Bergen County. All of the areas in the district are generally favorable for Republicans; although Bergen County has trended Democratic in recent elections.

For the 108th and successive Congresses (based on redistricting following the 2000 Census), the district contains all or portions of four counties and 84 municipalities.[2]

Bergen County:

Allendale, Alpine, Bergenfield, Closter, Cresskill, Demarest, Dumont, Emerson, Franklin Lakes, Glen Rock, Harrington Park, Haworth, Hillsdale, Ho-Ho-Kus, Mahwah, Midland Park, Montvale, New Milford (part, also 9th), Northvale, Norwood, Oakland, Old Tappan, Oradell, Paramus, Park Ridge, Ramsey, Ridgewood, River Edge, River Vale, Rochelle Park, Rockleigh, Saddle River, Tenafly, Upper Saddle River, Waldwick, Washington Township, Westwood, Woodcliff Lake, Wyckoff

Passaic County:

Bloomingdale (part, also 11th), Ringwood, Wanaque, West Milford

Sussex County:

Andover Borough, Andover Township, Branchville, Frankford Township, Franklin, Fredon Township, Green Township, Hamburg, Hampton Township, Hardyston Township, Hopatcong, Lafayette Township, Montague Township, Newton, Ogdensburg, Sandyston Township, Sparta Township (part, also 11th), Stillwater Township, Sussex, Vernon Township, Walpack Township, Wantage Township

Warren County:

All 22 municipalities

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2008 President McCain 54 - 45%
2004 President Bush 57 - 43%
2000 President Bush 52 - 45%

Representatives

Representative Party Years District home Note
District organized from New Jersey's At-large congressional district
Franklin Davenport Federalist March 4, 1799 – March 3, 1801 Woodbury Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem Counties
District organized to New Jersey's At-large congressional district
District organized from New Jersey's At-large congressional district
William Wright Whig March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1847 Newark Bergen, Essex, Hudson, and Passaic Counties
Dudley S. Gregory Whig March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849 Jersey City
James G. King Whig March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1851 Hoboken
Rodman M. Price Democratic March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853 Hoboken
Alexander C. M. Pennington Whig March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1855 Newark Essex and Hudson Counties
Opposition March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857
Jacob R. Wortendyke Democratic March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859 Jersey City Union County formed from Essex (1857)
William Pennington Republican March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1861 Newark Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1860-1861
Nehemiah Perry Democratic March 4, 1861 – March 3, 1865 Newark Hudson County and City of Newark from 1862
Edwin R.V. Wright Democratic March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1867 Hudson City
George A. Halsey Republican March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1869 Newark
Orestes Cleveland Democratic March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1871 Jersey City
George A. Halsey Republican March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873
William W. Phelps Republican March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875 Bergen, Morris, and Passaic Counties
Augustus W. Cutler Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1879
Charles H. Voorhis Republican March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881
John Hill Republican March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1883
William W. Phelps Republican March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1889
Charles D. Beckwith Republican March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1891
Cornelius A. Cadmus Democratic March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1895 Bergen and Passaic Counties from 1892
James F. Stewart Republican March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1903
Charles N. Fowler Republican March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1911 Morris, Union, and Warren Counties / Fowler from the 8th district
William E. Tuttle, Jr. Democratic March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1915 Morris and Union Counties from 1912
John H. Capstick Republican March 4, 1915 – March 17, 1918 died
Vacant March 17, 1918 – November 5, 1918
William F. Birch Republican November 5, 1918 – March 3, 1919
Ernest R. Ackerman Republican March 4, 1919 – October 18, 1931 died
Vacant October 18, 1931 – December 1, 1931
Percy Hamilton Stewart Democratic December 1, 1931 – March 3, 1933
Charles A. Eaton Republican March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1953 Morris, Somerset, and northern Middlesex counties / Eaton from 4th district
Peter Frelinghuysen, Jr. Republican January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1975 Northern Middlesex removed to the new 15th District (1962) / From 1970 District no longer follows county lines.
Millicent Fenwick Republican January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1983
Marge Roukema Republican January 3, 1983 – January 3, 2003 redistricted from 7th district
Scott Garrett Republican January 3, 2003 – Present Incumbent

References

External links

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