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New Madrid County, Missouri
Map of Missouri highlighting New Madrid County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the U.S. highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
Seat New Madrid
Largest city New Madrid
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

698 sq mi (1,808 km²)
678 sq mi (1,756 km²)
20 sq mi (52 km²), 2.87%
PopulationEst.
 - (2008)
 - Density

17,589
13/sq mi (5/km²)
Founded October 1, 1812
Named for Madrid, Spain
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

New Madrid County (pronounced New MAD-rid, short as in "mad") is a county located in the Bootheel of Southeast Missouri in the United States. As of the 2000 U.S. Census, the county's population was 19,760. A 2008 estimate, however, showed the population to be 17,589. The largest city and county seat is New Madrid[1]. The county was officially organized on October 1, 1812, and is named after a district located in the region that was once under Spanish rule, Nuevo Madrid, after Madrid, Spain.

Contents

History

The settlement of this district was begun in the winter of 1786-1787 by brothers Francois and Joseph Lesieur in the employ of Cerre, a fur trader and merchant of St. Louis. They had been sent down the Mississippi River in a canoe the previous year to select a suitable place for a trading post and had now come to build a house and begin trade with the Native Americans. They were very successful. The Delaware tribe brought in immense quantities of furs and skins, of which they readily disposed for powder and shot and such trifles as delight the heart of the savage. But so rich a mine could not be long concealed from Vincennes and other posts. The place soon became one of the best trading points in the country west of the Mississippi River and the name of “L'anse a la graisse” was bestowed upon it. But while these simple French traders were trafficking with the Native Americans and growing rich, the eyes of a man with a greater ambition were fixed upon the country. Col. George Morgan, a native of New Jersey who had been an officer in the American Army, while passing down the Mississippi River to New Orleans conceived the idea of building a great commercial city in the Spanish territory opposite or below the mouth of the Ohio River. He at once began negotiations with the Spanish government for a large grant of land, and by extravagant promises succeeded in obtaining it. He published a prospectus of the city which he proposed to lay out, and early in 1789, with a party of some 50 or 60 emigrants, descended the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to a point about a mile below the present town of New Madrid. His ambitious designs, however, were soon brought to an end. Gen. James Wilkinson was at this time intriguing with the Spanish Governor Miro at New Orleans for the purpose of inciting a rebellion of the people west of the Alleghenies against the U.S. government with the intention of attaching them to the Spanish government. He was very jealous of a rival, and such he conceived Col. Morgan to be. He conducted his negotiations through Gov. Miro, and in a letter to that officer stated that in connection with others he has applied for a grant in the Yazoo country in order “to destroy the place of a certain Col. Morgan.”[citation needed] He then went on to say:[citation needed]

“This Col. Morgan resides for the present with his family in the vicinity of Princeton, in New Jersey, but twenty or twenty-five years ago he used to trade with the Indians at Kaskaskia, in co-partnership with Boynton & Wharton. He is a man of education, and possesses an intelligent mind, but he is a deep and thorough speculator. He has already become twice a bankrupt, and according to the information I have lately received he is now in extremely necessitous circumstances. He was sent by a New Jersey company to New York in order to negotiate with Congress the purchase of a vast tract of land, comprising Cahokia and Kaskaskia. But whilst this affair was pending he found it to his interest to deal with Don Diego Gordoqui, and he discovered that it was more advantageous for him to shift his negotiations from the United States to Spain. The result was that he obtained, forsooth, the most extraordinary concession, which extends along the Mississippi from the mouth of the St. Francois River to Point Cinque Homme, in the West, containing from 12,000,000 to 15,000,000 of acres. I have not seen Morgan, nor am I acquainted with the particulars of his contract, but I have set a spy after him since his coming to these parts, and his going down the river to take possession of his new province, and through that spy I have collected the following information: That the intention of Morgan is to build a city on the west bank of the Mississippi, as near the mouth of the Ohio as the nature of ground may permit; that he intends selling his lands by small or large lots for a shilling an acre; that Don Diego Gordoqui pays all the costs of that establishment, and has undertaken to make that new town a free port to intercept all of the productions of this company on the most advantageous terms he may be able to secure from our people. Morgan departed from here on the beginning of this month to take possession of his territory, to survey it and to fix the site of the town, which will be called New Madrid. He took with him two surveyors and from forty to fifty persons beside.”[citation needed]

This letter produced upon Gov. Miro the effect desired by Wilkinson. On May 20, 1789, Miro wrote the Spainish concerning the policy of the conditions of the concession to Morgan and the extent of it. He denominated it an Imperium in Imperio and protested against it. He also wrote to Morgan, stating how he had been deceived in regard to the conditions and extent of the concession, and declared that it was entirely inadmissible. He also infinitely regretted that Morgan had, without authority, laid out a town, and spoken of it as "our city." He further informed him that a fort would be constructed there and a detachment of soldiers placed in it to receive favorably all his emigrants. Morgan replied the next day, tendering an apology for his course, but his loss of influence with the government cost him his prestige among the colonists, who began to murmur against his authority. Finally they sent an agent, John Ward, to present a complaint to Gov. Miro. Morgan, thus stripped of his concession and influence, soon after returned to the United States. Several of the colonists also returned to their former homes.[citation needed]

Of the emigrants who came out with Col. Morgan, the greater number was from Maryland and Pennsylvania. The names of but few could be ascertained. There were David Gray, Alexander Sampson, Joseph Story, Richard Jones Waters, John Hemphill, Elisha Winsor, Andrew Wilson, Samuel Dorsey, Benjamin Harrison, Jacob Meyers, Benjamin Meyers, William Chambers, Elisha Jackson, Ephraim Conner, John Hart, James Dunn, Lawrence Harrison, William Harrison, John Gregg, Nicholas Gerry, James Gerry, John Morris, John Becket, John Summers, Louis and Joseph Vandenbenden, Joseph McCourtney, John Pickett and David Shelby.[citation needed]

Of the earliest French settlers, the Lesieurs, Francois and Joseph, were not only the first, but also among the most influential, and their descendants are now numbered by the hundreds. They were sons of Charles Lesieur, who came from South France early in the last century and located at Three Rivers, Canada. Around 1785 they came to St. Louis and found employment with Gabriel Cerre, a fur trader, who sent them out to establish a trading post, as before related. Joseph had married before leaving Canada and became the father of two sons, both of whom died young. He himself died in April 1796. Francois married Cecile Guilbeaut on May 13, 1791; she was a native of Vincennes, and a daughter of Charles Gailbeaut and Cecile Thiriat. In 1794 they removed to Little Prairie where they resided until the New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-1812, when they returned to what is now New Madrid County and located at the old Point Pleasant, about a mile above the present village of that name. There, Francois Lesieur died in 1826 after having been three times married. By his first marriage he had seven children: Francois, Jr., who married a Miss Le Grand and reared a large family; Collestique, who became the wife of Noah Gambol; Margurite, who married Hypolite Thiriat (now Teror); Godfrey, who, in 1818, married Mary E. Loignon and reared a family of 11 children; Matilda, who became Mrs. W.B. Nicholas; Christine, who married George G Alford, and an infant. His second wife was a Miss Bono, who bore him one son, Napoleon. In 1820 he married the widow of Charles Loignon of Little Prairie. Raphael Lesieur, a nephew of Francois and Joseph Lesieur, came to New Madrid in 1798 and lived to be 72 years old. He married Frances Guilbeault and had a large family.[citation needed]

The majority of the French settlers was entirely uneducated, could neither read nor write, and possessed but little property. Among them were Joseph Hunot and his sons Gabriel and Joseph, and Joseph and Etienne St. Marie, all from Vincennes. By far the larger number of the French pioneers were originally from Canada but had resided at some of the neighboring posts—Vincennes, Kaskaskia and Ste. Genevieve. A few, however, were natives of France, and these were usually the best educated. To this number belonged Pierre Antoine Laforge, who came to New Madrid in 1794. He was a member of an aristocratic family and had been educated for the priesthood, but having fallen in love with his cousin, Margaret Gabrielle Colombe Champagne, had married her. He lived in Paris until driven out by the French Revolution when, taking his wife and family, with the exception of the youngest child, he sought refuge in America.[citation needed]

He located at Gallipolis, Ohio, where his family remained for several years. In 1794 he came to New Madrid, where he was appointed interpreter and public writer and was held in high esteem by the authorities of Upper Louisiana. He was recommended to Capt. Stoddard by De Lassus in 1803 as “a very zealous officer, performing the duties of adjutant of militia. He is also a justice of the peace and notary public. He performs these various offices with correctness and precision. I can do no less than recommend him as a man very active, earnest and useful for the public service; but he does not write English.”[citation needed]

He was appointed commandant of the post by Stoddard and served until the organization of courts. He subsequently held office of judge of the court of common pleas. When the earthquake of December 1811 occurred, he was sick of a fever and died from exposure, having been removed from the house to a tent. He was the father of 11 children, only three of whom married. They were Adele, Gabrielle and Peter A. The last named was a farmer and married Harriet, daughter of Charles Loignon. He, also, had a family of 11, of whom eight married. They were Margaret C., who first married Justice Morgan and after his death, John W. Butler; Alfred, who married Laura, daughter of Dr. Robert D. Dawson; Eliza, who became the wife of William S. Mosely; Alphonse, who married Fanny Hatcher; Agatha, who married Thomas Dawson; Prudence, who married Benjamin Stewart; Virginia, now the widow of William O'Bannon, and Mary, the widow of Dr. Drake McDowell.[citation needed]

Robert McKay (or McCoy) came to New Madrid as early as 1791, and for a long time was in command of a Spanish galley. After the change in the government he remained in the town and continued to reside there until his death in 1840.[citation needed]

Among these American colonists, Richard Jones Waters was the most prominent and influential. He was a native of Maryland and was the son of William Waters and Rachel Jones. He received a medical education, but seems to have never practiced his profession. He was engaged in a mercantile business at Louisville, Kentucky when Morgan set out for Upper Louisiana and he joined the expedition at that place. He was then 29 years of age and unmarried. He resumed business at New Madrid and began to accumulate property rapidly. He carried a large stock of such goods as were in demand at that time and purchased the greater portion of the produce shipped from New Madrid. He also owned the first water-mill in the district which was situated on Bayou St. John. In addition to all this, he dealt very extensively in land and land grants and was in involved in endless litigation. By reference to the archives of the post, it is found that he was a party to more than one-half of the civil suits before the commandant. But he was a successful business man, and at the time of his death in 1807, his personal property alone was valued at over $65,000, a very large amount for that day.[citation needed]

On the May 31, 1800, he was married to Francoise Julie Godfrey, widow of Louis Vandenbenden and a native of Normandy. They had no children, but prior to their marriage he had adopted two sons of Mrs. Jacob Meyers, of whom he was the reputed father. He was the captain of a militia company and served at different times as commandant of the post ad interim. Col. De Lassus wrote of him to Capt. Stoddard: “He is a zealous officer of extensive knowledge, but of a somewhat extravagant disposition and very quarrelsome.” His sons were John and Richard Jones Waters. The former was an adventurous spirit, and left the country as a youth. The latter remained with his adopted mother, and at her death fell heir to all the property. He was an intelligent gentleman of the "old school" type, and from him having descended many of the best people of Southeast Missouri.[citation needed]

Dr. Samuel Dorsey was also a native of Maryland. Upon his establishment of the military post at New Madrid, he received the appointment of surgeon at a salary of $30 per month and continued that position until the transfer of the country to the United States. On January 17, 1795, he married Marie J Boneau, a native of Vincennes, who died in 1799. Subsequently he married a daughter of Jeremiah Thompson of the Cape Girardeau District where he removed to in 1804. After the earthquake of 1811-1812, he went to Claiborne County, Mississippi.[citation needed]

Joseph Story was a native of Massachusetts and a son of William Story. He was a surveyor, and it is believed was brought to the country by Morgan to assist in laying off his city. In 1794 he married, at New Madrid, Catherine, a daughter of Jacob Seek, and a native of Pennsylvania.[citation needed]

Andrew Wilson was a native of Scotland and had been a minister in the Presbyterian Church. He was the father of George Wilson, the first sheriff of the district.[citation needed]

John Summers was also a Scotchman, and was the father of Andrew and Alexander Summers, both of whom located in the Cape Girardeau District around 1797. Andrew married Elizabeth, the daughter of George Ruddell, of Little Prairie.[citation needed]

The Vandenbendens, Joseph and Louis, were from Pennsylvania. The latter was a merchant and a man of considerable wealth. He died around 1797-1798 and his widow married Richard J. Waters. Joseph was a large land owner, and survived his brother many years.[citation needed]

Jacon Meyers was from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and was the father of Benjamin Meyers. Joseph McCourtney was a native of Ireland and married a daughter of John Prickett, who came from Virginia. David Gray was from Massachusetts; his wife, Dinah Gray, obtained a legal separation from her husband, and for many years kept up a sort of boarding house in New Madrid. She is said to have been a woman of more than ordinary intelligence.[citation needed]

John Lavallee, the last commandant under the old regime, has several descendants still residing in New Madrid County. He was the father of Charles A. Lavalle and a man of intelligence and education. He was recommended by De Lassus as follows: “He is a zealous and skillful officer, recommended for a long time for captain. I appointed him commandant ad interim of New Madrid. He was recognized by the Government, and I think would have been retained but for the change. Every time I employed him he gave me great satisfaction in the manner in which he acquitted himself. He speaks and writes Spanish, French and English, and is a firm, brave and prudent man.” He remained at New Madrid until his death and served for three years as judge of the court of common pleas.[citation needed]

In July 1789, Gov. Miro sent Lieutenant Pierre Forcher with two sergeants, two corporals and 30 soldiers to build a fort and to take civil and military command of the post at New Madrid. Upon his arrival, Forcher laid off a town between Bayou St. John and Bayou de Cypriere and built a fort upon the bank of the river, which he named Fort Celeste, in honor of the wife of Gov. Miro. Lieutenant Forcher was a man of energy and administrative ability, and soon established order and prosperity in the community. He was recalled, however, in about 18 months, and was succeeded by Thomas Portell.[citation needed]

A series of over one thousand earthquakes struck in the area in 1811 and 1812. The New Madrid Earthquake was the strongest non-subduction zone earthquake in the United States, and may have registered 9.0 on the moment magnitude scale.[citation needed]

Education

Of adults 25 years of age and older in New Madrid County, 63.6% possesses a high school diploma or higher while 9.6% holds a bachelor's degree or higher as their highest educational attainment.

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Public Schools

Private Schools

Alternative/Vocational Schools

  • New Madrid Bend Youth Center - New Madrid - (06-12) - Alternative
  • New Madrid R-I Technical Skills Center - New Madrid - (09-12) - Vocational/Technical

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 698 square miles (1,808 km²), of which, 678 square miles (1,756 km²) of it is land and 20 square miles (52 km²) of it (2.87%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 19,760 people, 7,824 households, and 5,508 families residing in the county. The population density was 29 people per square mile (11/km²). There were 8,600 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 83.21% White, 15.36% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. Approximately 0.93% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Among the major first ancestries reported in New Madrid County were 32.4% American, 10.3% Irish, 8.8% English, and 8.7% German, according to Census 2000.

There were 7,824 households out of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.00% were married couples living together, 14.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.60% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.40% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 92.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,758, and the median income for a family was $39,411. Males had a median income of $28,408 versus $19,186 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,227. About 18.60% of families and 22.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.40% of those under age 18 and 19.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Politics

Local

Politics at the local level in New Madrid County is completely controlled by the Democratic Party. All of New Madrid County's elected officeholders are Democrats.

Office Incumbent Party
Assessor Ronnie Simmons Democratic
Auditor Michael J. Allgier Democratic
Circuit Clerk Marsha Meatte Holiman Democratic
Clerk Clement Cravens Democratic
Collector Dewayne Nowlin Democratic
Commissioner – District 1 Mark Baker Democratic
Commissioner – District 2 Don Day Democratic
Coroner Jimmy McSpadden Democratic
Highway Engineer Donnie Brown Democratic
Presiding Commissioner Clyde M. Hawes Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney Lewis H. Recker Democratic
Public Administrator Riley Bock Democratic
Recorder Ann Evans Copeland Democratic
Sheriff Terry M. Stevens Democratic
Treasurer Tom Bradley Democratic

State

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 44.64% 3,574 53.87% 4,313 1.49% 120
2004 47.57% 3,737 51.38% 4,036 1.05% 82
2000 41.28% 2,978 57.50% 4,148 1.22% 88
1996 28.14% 2,106 70.43% 5,270 1.43% 107

New Madrid County is divided among three legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives.

  • District 160 - Rep. Ellen Brandom (R-Sikeston). Consists of Miner and the area around Sikeston. In 2008, Brandom ran unopposed and was reelected with 100% of the vote.
  • District 161 - Rep. Steve Hodges (D-East Prairie). Consists of most of the northern and eastern parts of the county. In 2008, Hodges ran unopposed and was reelected with 100% of the vote.
  • District 162 - Rep. Terry Swinger (D-Caruthersville). Consists of most of the western and southern parts of the county. In 2008, Swinger ran unopposed and was reelected with 100% of the vote.

New Madrid County is also a part of Missouri's 25th Senatorial District and is currently represented by State Senator Rob Mayer (R-Dexter). In 2008, Mayer defeated Shane M. Stoelting (D) 65.32-34.68 percent. New Madrid County backed Mayer with 54.53 percent while Stoelting received 45.47 percent. The 25th Senatorial District consists of Butler, Dunklin, New Madrid, Pemiscot, Ripley, Stoddard, and Wayne counties.

In Missouri's gubernatorial election of 2008, Governor of Missouri Jay Nixon (D) defeated former U.S. Representative Kenny Hulshof (R) with 58.40 percent of the total statewide vote. Nixon performed extremely well and won many of the rural counties in the state, including New Madrid County. The former attorney general Nixon carried New Madrid County with 53.87 percent of the vote to Hulshof’s 44.64 percent.

Federal

In the U.S. House of Representatives, New Madrid County is represented by Jo Ann Emerson (R-Cape Girardeau) who represents all of Southeast Missouri as part of Missouri's 8th Congressional District.

Political Culture

Past Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2008 56.76% 4,593 41.65% 3,370 1.59% 129
2004 52.54% 4,154 47.00% 3,716 0.46% 37
2000 47.01% 3,416 51.45% 3,738 1.54% 112
1996 31.93% 2,417 58.80% 4,451 9.27% 702

At the presidential level, New Madrid County is a fairly independent-leaning or battleground county although, like many counties in the impoverished Bootheel with a significant African American population, it does has a slight tendency to lean Democratic. While George W. Bush carried New Madrid County in 2004, Al Gore won the county in 2000, although both times the margins of victory were significantly closer than in many of the other rural areas. Bill Clinton also carried New Madrid County both times in 1992 and 1996 by convincing double-digit margins. And like many of the other rural counties in Missouri, New Madrid County favored John McCain over Barack Obama in 2008, although the margin of victory was smaller than in most rural areas.

Like most rural areas throughout Missouri, voters in New Madrid County generally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles but are more moderate or populist on economic issues, typical of the Dixiecrat philosophy. In 2004, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to define marriage as the union between a man and a woman—it overwhelmingly passed New Madrid County with 83.82 percent of the vote. The initiative passed the state with 71 percent of support from voters as Missouri became the first state to ban same-sex marriage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to fund and legalize embryonic stem cell research in the state—it failed in New Madrid County with 56.09 percent voting against the measure. The initiative narrowly passed the state with 51 percent of support from voters as Missouri became one of the first states in the nation to approve embryonic stem cell research. Despite New Madrid County’s longstanding tradition of supporting socially conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes like increasing the minimum wage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition B) to increase the minimum wage in the state to $6.50 an hour—it passed New Madrid County with 75.66 percent of the vote. The proposition strongly passed every single county in Missouri with 78.99 percent voting in favor as the minimum wage was increased to $6.50 an hour in the state. During the same election, voters in five other states also strongly approved increases in the minimum wage.

2008 Missouri Presidential Primary

In the 2008 Missouri Presidential Primary, voters in New Madrid County from both political parties supported candidates who finished in second place in the state at large and nationally.

Republican

Former Governor Mike Huckabee (R-Arkansas) won New Madrid County with 48.74 percent of the vote. U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) finished in second place in New Madrid County with 28.68 percent. Former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts) came in third place, receiving 18.57 percent of the vote while libertarian-leaning U.S. Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas) finished fourth with 3.19 percent in New Madrid County.

Huckabee slightly led Missouri throughout much of the evening until the precincts began reporting from St. Louis where McCain won and put him over the top of Huckabee. In the end, McCain received 32.95 percent of the vote to Huckabee’s 31.53 percent—a 1.42 percent difference. McCain received all of Missouri’s 58 delegates as the Republican Party utilizes the winner-take-all system.

Democratic

Former U.S. Senator and now Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-New York) won New Madrid County by an almost three-to-one margin over now President Barack Obama (D-Illinois). Clinton carried New Madrid County with 71.19 percent of the vote while Obama received 24.11 percent of the vote. Although he withdrew from the race, former U.S. Senator John Edwards (D-North Carolina) still received 3.99 percent of the vote in New Madrid County.

Clinton had a large initial lead in Missouri at the beginning of the evening as the rural precincts began to report, leading several news organizations to call the state for her; however, Obama rallied from behind as the heavily African American precincts from St. Louis began to report and eventually put him over the top. In the end, Obama received 49.32 percent of the vote to Clinton’s 47.90 percent—a 1.42 percent difference. Both candidates split Missouri’s 72 delegates as the Democratic Party utilizes proportional representation.

  • Hillary Rodham Clinton received more votes, a total of 1,801, than any candidate from either party in New Madrid County during the 2008 Missouri Presidential Primaries. She also received more votes than the total number of votes cast in the entire Republican Primary in New Madrid County.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Coordinates: 36°35′N 89°40′W / 36.59°N 89.66°W / 36.59; -89.66


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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New Madrid County, Missouri
Map
File:Map of Missouri highlighting New Madrid County.png
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the USA highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1812
Seat New Madrid
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 2.87%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

19760

New Madrid County (pronounced New MA-drid, short a as in "mad") is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. The county was organized in 1812 and named for the district located in the region during Spanish rule, Nuevo Madrid, after Madrid, Spain. As of 2000, the population was 19,760. Its county seat is New Madrid6.

Contents

History

A series of over one thousand earthquakes struck in the area in the early 19th Century. The New Madrid Earthquake was the strongest earthquake in the contiguous United States, and may have registered 8.0 on the Richter Scale.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,808 km² (698 sq mi). 1,756 km² (678 sq mi) of it is land and 52 km² (20 sq mi) of it (2.87%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 19,760 people, 7,824 households, and 5,508 families residing in the county. The population density was 11/km² (29/sq mi). There were 8,600 housing units at an average density of 5/km² (13/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 83.21% White, 15.36% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. 0.93% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 32.4% were of American, 10.3% Irish, 8.8% English and 8.7% German ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 7,824 households out of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.00% were married couples living together, 14.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.60% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.40% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 92.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,826, and the median income for a family was $32,462. Males had a median income of $28,408 versus $19,186 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,204. About 18.60% of families and 22.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.40% of those under age 18 and 19.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

See also


Coordinates: 36°35′N 89°40′W / 36.59, -89.66

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at New Madrid County, Missouri. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about New Madrid County, MissouriRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Missouri  +
Short name New Madrid County  +

This article uses material from the "New Madrid County, Missouri" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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