The Full Wiki

More info on New Orleans and Northeastern Railroad

New Orleans and Northeastern Railroad: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The New Orleans and Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark N&NE) was a Class I railroad in Louisiana and Mississippi in the United States. The railroad operated 196 miles (315 km) of track from its completion in 1883 until it was absorbed by the Alabama Great Southern Railroad subsidiary of the Southern Railway in 1969.

History

The New Orleans and Northeastern Railroad was incorporated in 1868 in Louisiana (under the name of Mandeville and Sulphur Springs Railroad until 1870[1]) and 1871 in Mississippi.[2] No track was built, however, and the company's land lay unused until 1881, when control of the company was acquired by the Alabama, New Orleans, Texas and Pacific Junction Railways Company.[2] Construction on the line began in 1882. The line opened in 1883 and extended 196 miles from New Orleans to Meridian, Mississippi.[2]

In 1916, the Southern Railway acquired the NO&NE, which eventually formed part of the Queen and Crescent Route.[2] From that point on, the NO&NE is not believed to have operated any of its own equipment; Southern Railway equipment was used for all movements on the line.

In 1969, as part of an effort to simplify its corporate structure, the Southern Railway's Alabama Great Southern Railroad operating subsidiary merged the NO&NE, ending its existence on paper.[2]

Today

The line remains in operation today. After a merger, the Southern Railway changed its name to the Norfolk Southern Railway in 1990.

References

  1. ^ Interstate Commerce Commission, 37 Val. Rep. 1 (1931): Valuation Docket No. 973, New Orleans and Northeastern Railroad Company
  2. ^ a b c d e The Historical Guide to North American Railroads. Kalmbach Books. p. 409.  
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message