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New York's 1st congressional district: Wikis

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New York's 1st congressional district
New York District 01 109th US Congress.png
Current Representative Tim Bishop (D)
Population (2000) 654,360
Median income $61,884
Ethnicity 89.3% White, 4.3% Black, 2.4% Asian, 7.5% Hispanic, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% other
Cook PVI EVEN

The 1st Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in eastern Long Island. It includes most of Central and Eastern Suffolk County, including most of Smithtown, as well as the entirety of the towns of Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, East Hampton, and Shelter Island. The district encompasses extremely wealthy enclaves such as the Hamptons, middle class suburban towns such as Selden, Centereach and Lake Grove, working class neighborhoods such as Mastic, Shirley, and Riverhead and rural farming communities such as Mattituck and Jamesport on the North Fork. Democrat Tim Bishop has represented the district since 2003.

The district is a battleground, as President George W. Bush defeated challenger John Kerry by less than a percentage point here in 2004, while in 2008, President Barack Obama defeated John McCain here 52%-48%.

Contents

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2000 President Gore 52 - 44%
2004 President Bush 49 - 49%
2008 President Obama 51 - 48%

Communities within the District

Amagansett, Aquebogue, Baiting Hollow, Bellport, Blue Point, Bridgehampton, Center Moriches, Centereach, Coram, Cutchogue, East Hampton, East Marion, East Moriches, East Patchogue, Farmingville, Greenport, Hampton Bays, Head of the Harbor, Holtsville, Jamesport, Kings Park, Lake Grove, Mastic, Mastic Beach, Mattituck, Medford, Middle Island, Miller Place, Montauk, Mount Sinai, Moriches, Nissequogue, North Bellport, North Patchogue, Patchogue, Port Jefferson, Quogue, Ridge, Riverhead, Rocky Point, Ronkonkoma, Sag Harbor, Sagaponack, Selden, Setauket, Shelter Island, Shirley, Shoreham, Smithtown, Southampton, Speonk, Springs, St. James, Stony Brook, Wading River, Wainscott, Water Mill, Westhampton, Westhampton Beach, Yaphank

Components: Past and Present

1963-present:

Parts of Suffolk

1945-1963:

All of Suffolk
Parts of Nassau

1913-1945:

All of Suffolk, Nassau
Parts of Queens

List of representatives

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1789 - 1813: One seat

Representative Party Years District home Note
William Floyd Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 – March 3, 1791 Brookhaven
Vacant March 4, 1791 – May, 1791 Representative-elect James Townsend died before taking his seat.
Thomas Tredwell Anti-Administration May, 1791 – March 3, 1795
Jonathan Nicoll Havens Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 – October 25, 1799 Shelter Island Died
vacant October 25, 1799 – February 6, 1800
John Smith Democratic-Republican February 6, 1800 – February 23, 1804 Mastic Resigned
vacant February 23, 1804 – November 5, 1804
Samuel Riker Democratic-Republican November 5, 1804 – March 3, 1805
Eliphalet Wickes Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1807
Samuel Riker Democratic-Republican March 4, 1807 – March 3, 1809
Ebenezer Sage Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1813

1813 - 1823: Two seats

From 1809 to 1823, two seats were apportioned, elected at-large on a general ticket.

Seat A

Representative Party Years District home Note
John Lefferts Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1815
Henry Crocheron Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1817
Tredwell Scudder Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819
Silas Wood Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 – March 3, 1823 Became the sole representative from the district in 1823

Seat B

Representative Party Years District home Note
Ebenezer Sage Democratic-Republican March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1815
George Townsend Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1819
vacant March 3, 1819 – January 14, 1820 Ebenezer Sage presented his credentials as a Representative-elect, but did not qualify.
James Guyon, Jr. Democratic-Republican January 14, 1820 – March 3, 1821 Successfully contested the election of Ebenezer Sage
Vacant March 3, 1821 – December 12, 1821 Peter Sharpe presented his credentials as a Representative-elect, but did not qualify.
Cadwallader D. Colden Federalist December 12, 1821 – March 3, 1823 Successfully contested the election of Peter Sharpe

1823 - present: One seat

Representative Party Years District home Note
Silas Wood Adams-Clay DR March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
Adams March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829
James Lent Jacksonian March 4, 1829 – February 22, 1833 Died
Vacant February 22, 1833 – March 4, 1833
Abel Huntington Jacksonian March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837
Thomas B. Jackson Democratic March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1841
Charles A. Floyd Democratic March 4, 1841 – March 3, 1843
Selah B. Strong Democratic March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1845
John W. Lawrence Democratic March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1847
Frederick W. Lord Democratic March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849
John Alsop King Whig March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1851
John G. Floyd Democratic March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853
James Maurice Democratic March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1855
William Valk American March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857
John A. Searing Democratic March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859
Luther C. Carter Republican March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1861
Edward H. Smith Democratic March 4, 1861 – March 3, 1863
Henry G. Stebbins Democratic March 4, 1863 – October 24, 1864 Resigned
Vacant October 24, 1864 – December 5, 1864
Dwight Townsend Democratic December 5, 1864 – March 3, 1865
Stephen Taber Democratic March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1869
Henry A. Reeves Democratic March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1871
Dwight Townsend Democratic March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873
Henry J. Scudder Republican March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Henry B. Metcalfe Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877
James W. Covert Democratic March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1881
Perry Belmont Democratic March 4, 1881 – December 1, 1888 Resigned to become United States minister to Spain
vacant December 1, 1888 – March 4, 1889
James W. Covert Democratic March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1895
Richard C. McCormick Republican March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1897
Joseph M. Belford Republican March 4, 1897 – March 3, 1899
Townsend Scudder Democratic March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1901
Frederic Storm Republican March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903 Lost reelection
Townsend Scudder Democratic March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1905
William W. Cocks Republican March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911 Lost reelection
Martin W. Littleton Democratic March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1913
Lathrop Brown Democratic March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1915 Lost reelection
Frederick C. Hicks Republican March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1923
Robert L. Bacon Republican March 4, 1923 – September 12, 1938 Died
Vacant September 12, 1938 – January 3, 1939
Leonard W. Hall Republican January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1945 Redistricted to the 2nd congressional district
Edgar A. Sharp Republican January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1947 Brookhaven
W. Kingsland Macy Republican January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1951
Ernest Greenwood Democratic January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1953 Bay Shore
Stuyvesant Wainwright Republican January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1961
Otis G. Pike Democratic January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1979
William Carney Republican January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1987
George J. Hochbrueckner Democratic January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1995
Michael P. Forbes Republican January 3, 1995 – July 17, 1999
Democratic July 17, 1999 – January 3, 2001
Felix Grucci Republican January 3, 2001 – January 3, 2003 Brookhaven
Timothy H. Bishop Democratic January 3, 2003 – present Southampton Incumbent

Election results

Note that in New York State electoral politics there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

In 2008, Bishop won re-election against Republican challenger Lee Zeldin.

US House election, 2006: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 104,360 62.2 +6.0
Republican Italo Z. Zanzi 63,328 37.8 -6.0
Majority 41,032 24.5 +12.1
Turnout 167,688 100 -39.7
US House election, 2004: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 156,354 56.2 +6.0
Republican William M. Manger, Jr. 121,855 43.8 -4.8
Majority 34,499 12.4 +10.8
Turnout 278,209 100 +65.8
US House election, 2002: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Timothy H. Bishop 84,276 50.2 +9.6
Republican Felix Grucci 81,524 48.6 -6.9
Green Lorna Salzman 1,991 1.2 -0.0
Majority 2,752 1.6 -13.3
Turnout 167,791 100 -30.0
US House election, 2000: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Felix Grucci 133,020 55.5 -8.6
Democratic Regina Seltzer 97,299 40.6 +4.7
Democratic Michael P. Forbes 6,318 2.6 +2.6
Green William G. Holst 2,967 1.2 +1.2
Majority 35,721 14.9 -13.4
Turnout 239,604 100 +54.5
US House election, 1998: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael P. Forbes 99,460 64.1 +9.4
Democratic William G. Holst 55,630 35.9 -9.4
Majority 43,830 28.3 +18.9
Turnout 155,090 100 -27.2
US House election, 1996: New York District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael P. Forbes 116,620 54.7
Democratic Nora L. Bredes 96,496 45.3
Majority 20,124 9.4
Turnout 213,116 100

References


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