The Full Wiki

Nicaraguan córdoba: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nicaraguan córdoba
Córdoba Nicaragüense (Spanish)
Córdoba banknotes. This image includes both the banknotes in circulation and the older "centavos" (cents) notes that are rarely used. Córdoba coins, otherwise known as cents. These coins have replaced the old centavos banknotes. Their denominations vary from 2 Córdobas to 5 Córdoba cents.
Córdoba banknotes. This image includes both the banknotes in circulation and the older "centavos" (cents) notes that are rarely used. Córdoba coins, otherwise known as cents. These coins have replaced the old centavos banknotes. Their denominations vary from 2 Córdobas to 5 Córdoba cents.
ISO 4217 Code NIO
User(s)  Nicaragua
Inflation 19.8%
Source Index Mundi, 2009 est.
Subunit
1/100 centavo
Symbol C$
Coins 5, 10, 25, 50 centavos, C$1, C$5, C$10
Banknotes C$10, C$20, C$50, C$100, C$200, C$500
Central bank Banco Central de Nicaragua
Website www.bcn.gob.ni

The córdoba, sign: C$; code: NIO is the currency of Nicaragua. It is divided into 100 centavos

Contents

History

The first córdoba was introduced on March 20, 1912. It replaced the peso at a rate of 12½ pesos = 1 córdoba & was initially equal to the US dollar. It was named after the founder of Nicaragua, Francisco Hernández de Córdoba.

On February 15, 1988, the 2nd córdoba was introduced. It was equal to 1000 1st córdobas. On April 30, 1991 the third córdoba, also called the córdoba oro, was introduced, worth 5,000,000 2nd córdobas. As of September 17, 2009, 20.555 córdobas oro equals one dollar.

Coins

Advertisements

First córdoba

In 1912, coins were introduced in denominations of ½, 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 centavos and 1 córdoba. The ½ & 1 centavo were minted in bronze, the 5 centavos in cupro-nickel and the higher denominations in silver. The 1 córdoba was only minted in 1912, whilst ½ centavo production ceased in 1937.

In 1939, cupro-nickel replaced silver on the 10, 25 & 50 centavos. In 1943, a single year issue of brass 1, 5, 10 & 25 centavos was made. These were the last 1 centavo coins. In 1972, cupro-nickel 1 córdoba coins were issued, followed, in 1974, by aluminium 5 and 10 centavos.

A new series of coins, featuring a portrait of Augusto César Sandino, was introduced in 1981, consisting of aluminum 5 & 10 centavos, nickel-clad steel 25 centavos & cupro-nickel 50 centavos, 1 & 5 córdobas. Nickel clad steel replaced cupro nickel between 1983 and 1984. In 1987, the final coins of the 1st córdoba were issued, featuring Sandino's characteristic hat. Aluminum 5, 10 & 25 centavos and aluminium-bronze 50 centavos, 1 & 5 córdobas were issued, together with aluminium 500 córdobas.

2nd córdoba

No coins were issued for this currency.

3rd córdoba (córdoba oro)

In 1994, coins were issued in denominations of 5, 10, 25 & 50 centavos. All were minted in chrome-plated steel. In 1997, nickel-clad steel 50 centavos, 1 & 5 córdobas were introduced, followed by copper-plated steel 5 centavos & brass-plated steel 10 & 25 centavos in 2002 & brass-plated steel 10 cordobas in 2007.

All current coins have the coat of arms of the country on the obverse and the numeral of the denomination on the reverse.

1997 Series
Value Technical parameters Description Date of first minting
Diameter Mass Composition Edge Obverse Reverse
5 centavos 18.5 mm 3 g Copper plated steel Plain Coat of arms Value, "EN DIOS CONFIAMOS"1, year of minting 2002
10 centavos 20.5 mm 4 g Brass plated steel Reeded and plain sections Coat of arms Value, "EN DIOS CONFIAMOS", year of minting 2002
25 centavos 23.2 mm 5 g
50 centavos Nickel clad steel Coat of arms Value, "EN DIOS CONFIAMOS", year of minting 1997
1 córdoba
5 córdobas
For table standards, see the coin specification table.

Remarks

  1. "EN DIOS CONFIAMOS" - In God we trust

Banknotes

First córdoba

In 1912, the National Bank of Nicaragua introduced notes for 10, 25 and 50 centavos, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 córdobas, together with old 50 centavos and 1 peso notes overprinted for 4 and 8 centavos of the new currency. In 1934, all circulating banknotes were exchanged for notes which had been overprinted with "REVALIDO" ("revalidated"). The last notes for less than 1 córdoba were dated 1938. In 1945, 500 córdobas notes were introduced, followed by 1000 córdobas in 1953.

In 1962, the Central Bank of Nicaragua took over paper money issuance. The 1 córdoba notes were replaced by coins in 1972. After 5 córdobas coins were introduced in 1981, 2 and 5 córdobas notes were withdrawn. In 1987, 5000 córdobas notes were introduced, followed by overprinted 10,000 (on 10), 20,000 (on 20), 50,000 (on 50), 100,000 (on 100), 100,000 (on 500), 200,000 (on 1,000), 500,000 (on 20), 500,000 (on 1,000) and 1,000,000 (on 1,000) córdobas notes as inflation drastically reduced the córdoba's value.

Second córdoba

The second córdoba was only issued in banknote form. Notes (dated 1985) were issued in 1988 in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 córdobas together with undated 5000 córdobas. In 1989, notes for 20,000 and 50,000 córdobas were introduced, followed the next year by 5 million and 10 million córdobas notes.

Third córdoba (córdoba oro)

In 1991, notes were introduced for 1, 5, 10 and 25 centavos, ½, 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 córdobas. The notes below 1 córdoba were replaced by coins in 1994, with 5 córdobas notes also being replaced in 1997. 500 córdobas notes were introduced in 2002.

Famous people from Nicaragua's history are depicted on the obverses of the current banknotes. The reverses depict landmarks or natural habitats in the country.

2002 Series
Image Value Main Color Description Date of printing
Obverse Reverse
10 Cordobas Reg Cir Front.jpg C$10 Green Miguel Larreynaga Islets of Granada 2002
20 Cordobas Reg Cir Front.jpg C$20 Orange José Santos Zelaya Atlantic Beach
50 Cordobas Front 2002 Reg Cir.jpg C$50 Purple Pedro Joaquín Chamorro Fortress of El Castillo
100 Cordobas Front Reg Cir 2002.jpg C$100 Blue Rubén Darío Rubén Darío National Theatre
500 Cordobas Front da.jpg C$500 Red José Dolores Estrada Hacienda San Jacinto
For table standards, see the banknote specification table.

2009 Series

On 15 May 2009, polymer ten and twenty córdoba notes were issued to replace their paper counterparts.[1] A new polymer two hundred and a hundred córdoba banknote was first issued in June 2009. A new polymer 50 córdoba was issued in December 2009. It is expected that a new design of a polymer 500 córdoba banknote will be produced at a later time.

2009 Series [1]
Image Value Dimensions Main Colour Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse Watermark printing issue
10 Cordobas 2009 Front Nuevo.jpg 10 Cordobas 2009 Back Nuevo.jpg 10 Cordobas1 131 × 67 mm Green El Castillo on Rio San Juan Hacienda San Jacinto "10", slighted tilted above El Castillo on the upper right hand side. 2009 May 15, 2009
20 Cordobas 2009 Front Nuevo.jpg 20 Cordobas 2009 Back Nuevo.jpg 20 Cordobas2 136 × 67 mm Peach Hut of natives on the eastern coast of the Caribbean. Illustration of the Palo de Mayo dance "20", indigenous man with stick May 15, 2009
50 Cordobas 2009 Front Nuevo.jpg 50 Cordobas 2009 Back Nuevo.jpg 50 Cordobas 141 x 67 mm Purple National ceramic of Nicaragua Canyon of Somoto "50" watermark December 3, 2009
100 Cordobas 2009 Front Nuevo.jpg 100 Cordobas 2009 Back Nuevo.jpg 100 Cordobas 146 × 67 mm Blue and violet, respectively Monument to Ruben Dario Cathedral of Leon. Emblem of the Central Bank of Nicaragua; watermark of a lion. June 1, 2009
200 Cordobas 2009 Front Nuevo.jpg 200 Cordobas 2009 Back Nuevo.jpg 200 Cordobas 151 × 67 mm Brown-green-blue-yellow (depending on side) El Guegense Ometepe Island, the national bird, the Guardabarranco. "200", The Guegense with watermark and cape. June 1, 2009
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimetre. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.

Historical exchange rates

    • 20.865 (Yahoo) or 20.8623 (XE) or 20.5250 (Oanda) (January 10, 2009)
    • 20.425 (Yahoo) or 20.4263 (XE) or 20.222 (Oanda) or 20.4268 (Central Bank of Nicaragua) córdobas (August 4, 2009)
    • 18.032 (Yahoo) or 19.874 (XE) or 20.113 (Oanda) córdobas (January 3, 2009)
    • 18.032 córdobas (June 19, 2008)
    • 18.032 córdobas (April 24, 2007)
    • 17.066 córdobas (June 5, 2006)
    • 17.1754 córdobas (January 13, 2006)
    • 16.300 córdobas (April 2005)
    • 15.5515 córdobas (December 2003)
    • 30.0562 (Yahoo) or 30.0772 (XE) or 29.5661 (Oanda) (January 10, 2009)
    • 29.3674 (Yahoo) or 29.3721 (XE) or 28.93586 (Oanda) córdobas (August 4, 2009)
    • 25.1033 (Yahoo) or 27.532 (XE) or 28.008 (Oanda) córdobas (January 3, 2009)
    • 29.8987 córdobas (June 19, 2008)
    • 24.583 córdobas (April 24, 2007)
    • 22.1168 córdobas (June 5, 2006)
    • 19.910 córdobas (January 2006)
    • 21.361 córdobas (April 2005)
    • 19.6462 córdobas (December 2003)
Current NIO exchange rates
From Google Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From Yahoo! Finance: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From XE.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD
From OANDA.com: AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP HKD JPY USD

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1900518,00.html

External links



Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message