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Nickel Creek

Chris Thile, Sara Watkins, and Sean Watkins on the Farewell (For Now) tour in October 2007.
Background information
Origin San Diego County, California, USA
Genres Progressive bluegrass
Acoustic
Years active 1989–2007
Labels Sugar Hill Records
Associated acts Alison Krauss, Mutual Admiration Society, Punch Brothers, Switchfoot, Fiction Family
Website www.nickelcreek.com
Former members
Chris Thile
Sara Watkins
Sean Watkins

Nickel Creek was an American acoustic music trio. Although the group's music has roots from bluegrass, the trio describes itself as "progressive acoustic".[1] Nickel Creek consisted of three permanent members: Chris Thile (mandolin), Sara Watkins (fiddle), and her brother Sean Watkins (guitar). The trio has always recorded and toured with a bass player, but no bass player has ever been an official member of the band. Chris's father Scott Thile played bass with the group until 2000, followed by Byron House, and Derek Jones. Mark Schatz has played bass regularly with the group since 2003.[2][3] In interviews, the band has stressed that they are not a bluegrass band, but a band that "incorporates bluegrass into [its] music".[4] Nickel Creek has covered songs by Weezer, Radiohead, Pavement, Coldplay, Elliott Smith, Bob Dylan, The White Stripes, the Jackson Five and Britney Spears.[5]

Contents

History

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Early days: 1989–1999

Nickel Creek formed at "That Pizza Place" in Carlsbad, California in 1989 with Scott Thile, Chris' father, playing string bass.[6][7][8] The two families, the Watkins and the Thiles, met after Sean Watkins and Chris Thile had mandolin lessons with the same teacher, John Moore.[8] Sara Watkins studied with Moore's bandmate, Dennis Caplinger.[8] At the start of Nickel Creek's history, Chris Thile and Sean Watkins played guitar and mandolin, respectively after deciding to switch.[6][8] The oldest of the children, Sean, was only twelve years old at the time.[9] Upon forming, the band decided the name of the band, which comes from a song by Byron Berline, who was Sara Watkins' fiddle instructor at the time.[10] Nickel Creek played many renowned bluegrass festivals throughout the nineties, but by the mid-nineties, the three members of the band had to be home-schooled to accommodate their busy schedule. "The school wasn’t really cool with us missing the first two weeks of school and the last week of school," recalled Sara Watkins, "just because there were some really great festivals back east."[11] In the early days, Nickel Creek released two albums: Little Cowpoke in 1993, and Here to There in 1997.

Nickel Creek: 2000–2001

For Nickel Creek's next album release, the trio was in need of a producer, and Alison Krauss filled that position. Sara Watkins discussed their affiliation with Krauss in a 2000 interview.

We started discussing possibilities for a producer, but hadn't decided. We played a show at the Ryman and we were opening for a band that included Tony Rice and Dan Tyminski. Alison Krauss and Ron Block were there. They came up and talked to us afterwards and were really enthusiastic about our show. So, we thought, 'WHAT IF...' Alison WAS kind of excited and just maybe she'd produce our CD. And she DID! Barry Poss of Sugar Hill asked her and we were just thrilled. We really needed vocal help. We've never been that insecure about our instrumentals, but vocals were another thing. They were weak points for us but are getting stronger, thanks to the work Alison has done with us. Alison just brought so much to the production of the CD. She was very good at spotting things that wouldn't last on a CD.[12]

Krauss produced their self titled 2000 release on Sugar Hill, which was widely considered their first major release. It was their most successful album to date, certified gold in 2002 and platinum later on. Critics responded favorably to the album, with Allmusic giving it four and a half stars out of five.

Nickel Creek received two Grammy nominations for the album: Best Bluegrass Album and Best Country Instrumental for "Ode to a Butterfly". They were also nominated at the CMA Awards for Best Vocal Group and the Horizon Award.[13] Nickel Creek's video for "The Lighthouse's Tale" was nominated a CMT "Flameworthy Video Award" for Group/Duo Video of the Year.[14] In addition to the Grammy nominations, they were named one of the "Five Music Innovators of the Millennium" by TIME Magazine in May 2000.[3]

To promote the album, Nickel Creek toured as a headlining and opening act in 2000 and 2001. The band opened eleven shows for ??? and opened eleven shows for Lyle Lovett in the summer of 2000, and played Austin City Limits in January 2001 with Dolly Parton. One month later, Parton invited Nickel Creek to perform as her back-up band at the 2001 Grammy Awards. The trio also had a spring tour with former Toad the Wet Sprocket lead singer Glen Phillips in a collaboration dubbed Mutual Admiration Society. A self titled album was set to be released, but the album's release was delayed until 2004. Nickel Creek also opened for Vince Gill and Amy Grant in the winter.[15][16] Shortly after Nickel Creek started touring, Scott Thile decided to stop playing with the band due to lack of family time. Thile was briefly replaced by bassist Byron House, and in March 2001, a new bassist, Derek Jones, joined the touring band.[16]

This Side: 2002–2004

Sara Watkins, Mark Schatz, and Chris Thile touring in 2003 after the release of This Side.

In 2002, the band released their fourth album This Side, produced by Alison Krauss. The album was a major transition from their previous releases, the first two being purely bluegrass. Although the core influence of bluegrass remained throughout the album, many other genres were present, such as indie rock and folk rock (the band covered Spit on a Stranger by Pavement, and Should've Known Better by Carrie Newcomer). When discussing the album in an interview from Barnes & Noble, Chris Thile described it:

We're not content to just go a little further. It's been three years since we recorded the first album, and I think people are forgetting that because all the attention has come in the last year. So the response is almost like, "Well, is it a concept record?" It certainly isn't; it's just who we are. People who ask that question have no concept of what we were like three years ago, before the first album came out. They also need to understand that [because of our youth], three years in our lives is a much larger percentage of how long we've lived. So there's going to be more change per year. We're growing and we're together all the time, so we're constantly trying to figure out new stuff.[17]

As with Nickel Creek, critics responded positively to This Side. Charles Spano of Allmusic said that "Thile and the Watkins siblings' originals, like the sleepy, subtle "Speak" and the darker "Beauty and the Mess," easily outdo the likes of folk-rockers Dave Matthews and Hootie & the Blowfish, while forging a new style to rejuvenate a genre that has always been a bit of a dark horse."[18]

This Side entered the Billboard 200 at #18 on the chart, and at #2 on the magazine's Top Country Albums chart.[19] The album was soon certified gold the following year of its release by the RIAA.[20] The success of This Side earned the group several awards, including a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album.[3][7] The band was featured in Rolling Stone's "Best Of 2002" edition following the release of This Side.[3]

During the 2002 and 2003 This Side tour, Nickel Creek performed mainly as a headlining act, but also opened five shows for John Mayer in November 2002 in Upstate New York and New England,[21] and toured with Gillian Welch and David Rawlings earlier in the year.[22] In 2003, Nickel Creek appeared on Béla Fleck and the Flecktones's album Little Worlds.[23]

Why Should the Fire Die?: 2005

After three years since the release of This Side, Nickel Creek released their fifth album Why Should the Fire Die?. The album brought more rock and pop influences to Nickel Creek, just as This Side did. Chris Thile discussed the band's genre and style in a 2005 interview from Jambase: "We actually feel like more than a bluegrass band that stretched out. We are a band that incorporates bluegrass into our music. There's been a problem in perception. 'Bluegrass band leaves the fold' (uses a news announcer voice). No, no, no, no, no. Actually, it's a band that incorporates a little bluegrass into whatever the hell kind of music they play."[4] Sean Watkins also said:

Well, actually, I think this record that we’re doing, it’s not moving farther away from bluegrass, I mean – we’ve always been far away from our bluegrass roots, I don’t think this record is much farther away than the last one. It’s just different. This record – I think it sounds more like we do I think than anything we’ve ever done. It’s a lot more rock I think than our first two, and there’s some stuff that’s farther out than we’ve gone, and there’s some stuff that’s very, that’s more roots–oriented. So I wouldn’t say that the whole thing is farther away.[9]

Why Should the Fire Die? debuted and peaked at #17 on the Billboard 200 and topped the Billboard bluegrass chart.[7]

In the summer of 2006, Nickel Creek appeared at numerous music festivals including Bonnaroo,[24] High Sierra Music Festival, Austin City Limits,[25] SXSW,[26] Lollapalooza,[27] and Star Fest.[28]

Farewell (For Now): 2006–2007

In late summer 2006, via Billboard and their official website, Nickel Creek announced that at the end of the year they would no longer be recording together as a group and their tour scheduled through 2007 would be their last for an indefinite period of time. According to Thile, "It's always been so natural, but lately it hasn't been quite as natural and we're running the risk of actually having to break up. We would rather leave it for a while, while it's still intact and healthy."[29]

Sean Watkins stated that all three members were ready to expand their musical horizons by experiencing real life again: "When you're on the road all the time and meet all these people who love your music, you can't always relate to them because stuff never happens to you. We're supposed to be writing songs that relate to other people... I need to be out there and having a different life than that. I am ready to write about real things again."[29]

Sara Watkins and Chris Thile on the Farewell (For Now) Tour in April 2007.

In November 2006, Sugar Hill released Reasons Why: The Very Best, a compilation album of selected studio tracks from Nickel Creek's three latest albums, as well as two previously un-released tracks and all of the music videos from the trio's singles.[30]

In 2006, Nickel Creek planned the Farewell (For Now) Tour, which was originally intended to be called the Victory Lap Tour, but the band's managers thought it would make them sound "presumptuous and boastful".[31] The seven month long Farewell (For Now) Tour started in April 2007 and ended in November 2007. In a statement at the start of the tour, Nickel Creek said that they "wanted to do this in a positive way and take that last lap before our break. We want to see our fans one more time and play with the musicians that have inspired us over the years."[32] The tour featured numerous guest appearances by Glen Phillips,[33][34] Jon Brion,[2] Fiona Apple,[35][36][37][38] Bruce Molsky,[39] Bela Fleck,[37] Tom Brosseau,[37] and Tift Merritt, among others.

Nickel Creek planned to record a live DVD at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville in November 2007 with special guests over the course of two nights.[40] However, in November 2007, it was announced that the "plans for the video shoot have been scrapped".[40] The performances still took place, and were the last before the hiatus.[41]

Looking back on the Nickel Creek experience, which spanned eighteen years, Sara Watkins said, "A lot of the other stuff will be special in the way that anything is special when you realize that it’s not going to be around forever...Nothing is going to be Nickel Creek except Nickel Creek. I’m not looking for anything to top this. It can’t be duplicated in my life."[42]

Awards and nominations

Wins

Nominations

Discography

Albums

Compilations

  • 2006: Reasons Why: The Very Best

Singles

References

  1. ^ May, Caryn. "Nickel Creek dares to branch out". The Source Weekly. July 14, 2006. Retrieved January 20, 2008.
  2. ^ a b MacDonald, Patrick. "Bluegrass fans tell Nickel Creek "hurry back"". The Seattle Times. May 11, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  3. ^ a b c d Nickel Creek. "Meet The Band". Nickel Creek. June 8, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  4. ^ a b Cook, Dennis. "Chris Thile: Bringing In Some New Blood". JamBase. Retrieved January 17, 2007.
  5. ^ "The Complete List of Non-Album Originals/Covers". nickelcreek.info. 2006-11-12. http://www.nickelcreek.info/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=6638. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  6. ^ a b Quillien, Shay. "Hit-making Nickel Creek tries to catch its breath". Oakland Tribune. April 27, 2007. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  7. ^ a b c Rubin, Steven. "Grammys follow Nickel Creek as sound morphs". NC Times. December 14, 2005. Retrieved January 20, 2008.
  8. ^ a b c d Havighurst, Craig. "Nickel Creek: Newgrass Wunderkinder". Acoustic Guitar. August 2000. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  9. ^ a b "Nickel Creek's Sean Watkins Blue Ridge Exclusive Interview". Blue Ridge. 2006. http://www.blueridgecountry.com/people/sean-watkins.html. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  10. ^ Seida, Linda. "Chris Thile Bio on JamBase". JamBase. Retrieved December 27, 2007.
  11. ^ "Nickel Creek: Mandolin With No Country". Paste Magazine. 2006-08-01. http://www.pastemagazine.com/action/article/2051/nickel_creek?page=3. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  12. ^ "Sara Watkins". iBluegrass.com. 1999. Retrieved on October 13, 2007
  13. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "CMA Awards Add McBride, Tritt & More". Billboard. October 10, 2002. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  14. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "Jackson, McBride, Keith Lead 'Flameworthy' Noms". Billboard. May 14, 2002. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  15. ^ Martens, Todd. "Grant, Gill Take Christmas On Tour". Billboard. September 21, 2001. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  16. ^ a b Sara Watkins, Sean Watkins. "Nickel Creek Journals". Nickel Creek. August 17, 2000. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  17. ^ "Nickel Creek Tackle Bluegrass Tradition and Pop Innovation on This Side". Barnes & Noble. August 16, 2002. Retrieved November 11, 2007.
  18. ^ Charles Spano. "This Side - Nickel Creek". Allmusic. Retrieved November 11, 2007.
  19. ^ Martens, Todd/Ellis, Michael. "Nelly Topples The Boss At No. 1". Billboard. August 22, 2002. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  20. ^ "Nickel Creek Certified Gold". CMT. September 11, 2003. Retrieved February 19, 2008.
  21. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "Mayer Taps Randolph, Nickel Creek For Fall Tour". Billboard. October 25, 2002. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  22. ^ Sara Watkins. "Nickel Creek Journals". Nickel Creek. November 19, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  23. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "Flecktones Prep Ambitious Triple 'Worlds'". Billboard. June 12, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  24. ^ "Bonnaroo 2006 Lineup Announced". CMT. February 1, 2006. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  25. ^ "Petty, Morrison, Nelson Top 'Austin City Limits' Bill". Billboard. May 18, 2006. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  26. ^ Cohen, Johnathan. "First Round Of Artists Confirmed For SXSW". Billboard. December 15, 2005. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  27. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "Chili Peppers, Kanye, Wilco Lead Lollapalooza Lineup". Billboard. March 16, 2006. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  28. ^ Jeckell, Barry A. "Train, Pink lead Atlanta's Star Fest". Billboard. May 17, 2006. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  29. ^ a b Hasty, Katie. "Nickel Creek Going On Hiatus, Just Not Yet". Billboard. August 28, 2006. Retrieved February 19, 2008.
  30. ^ a b "Top 10 Country Compilations of 2006". CMT. December 22, 2006. Retrieved February 19, 2008.
  31. ^ Argyrakis, Andy. "Interview with Sean Watkins: Roots rock/alternative country combiners Nickel Creek say "farewell" for now LiveWire. August 8, 2007. Retrieved February 18, 2008.
  32. ^ "Nickel Creek Prepares First Leg of Farewell Tour". CMT. Retrieved February 19, 2008.
  33. ^ Jackson, Cory. "Sold out crowd says 'farewell' to Nickel Creek" Marshall Parthenon. Retrieved March 1, 2008.
  34. ^ Dickens, Tad. "End of the road for Nickel Creek?". The Roanoke Times. November 2, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  35. ^ Hasty, Kate. "Apple, Nickel Creek Teaming For Tour". Billboard. May 18, 2007.
  36. ^ Madison, Tjames. "Fiona Apple joins Nickel Creek's 'farewell' tour". LiveDaily. May 17, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  37. ^ a b c Kilgore, Kym. "Nickel Creek tours to the finish". LiveDaily. October 4, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  38. ^ Madison, Tjames. "Nickel Creek & Fiona Apple - 2007 collaborative & farewell Tour Dates (Summerstage)". Brooklyn Vegan. May 17, 2007. Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  39. ^ "Bruce Molsky On Tour with Nickel Creek". Compass Records. October 18, 2007. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  40. ^ a b John. "Nickel Creek - no DVD after all". The Bluegrass Blog. November 7, 2007. Retrieved November 11, 2007.
  41. ^ Dollar, Steve. "Putting the 'Blue' Back in Bluegrass" The New York Sun. February 19, 2008. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  42. ^ "Bluegrass group Nickel Creek says farewell (for now)". Go to Reno Tahoe. April 2007. Retrieved February 19, 2008.

External links


Simple English

Nickel Creek
Origin Southern California, United States
Genres Progressive acoustic
Years active 1989–2007
Labels Sugar Hill Records
Website www.nickelcreek.com
Members
Chris Thile
Sara Watkins
Sean Watkins

Nickel Creek is an American acoustic musical group. Although the group's music has roots in bluegrass, Nickel Creek now calls itself "progressive acoustic".[1] The band has three people: Chris Thile (mandolin), Sean Watkins (guitar), and Sara Watkins (violin). A fourth member also plays bass with the band. Chris Thile's father Scott Thile, Byron House, and Derek Jones have played bass with the group. Mark Schatz has played bass with Nickel Creek since 2003. The band has played songs by Radiohead, Elliott Smith, Bob Dylan, and even "Toxic" by Britney Spears.[2] However, most of the songs the band play are originals.

Contents

History

The band started in California in 1989 with Scott Thile, Chris' father, playing the double bass. The oldest of the children, Sean Watkins, was only twelve years old at the time.[3] In the early days, Nickel Creek made two albums: Little Cowpoke in 1993, and Here to There in 1997.

Nickel Creek: 2000–2001

Alison Krauss produced the album Nickel Creek, which came out in 2000 on Sugar Hill Records. It was made gold in 2002 by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and has now sold one million copies. Nickel Creek got two Grammy Award nominations for the album: Best Bluegrass Album and Best Country Instrumental for "Ode to a Butterfly". Three singles, "When You Come Back Down", "The Lighthouse's Tale", and "Reasons Why" were released with music videos, and the first two were on the US Country chart. The album itself topped the Billboard Heatseekers chart, and reached #125 on the Billboard 200.[4]

To help sell the album, Nickel Creek toured with artists like Lyle Lovett, Dolly Parton, Vince Gill, and Amy Grant.[5][6]

This Side: 2002–2004

[[File:|thumb|right|Sara Watkins, Mark Schatz, and Chris Thile in 2003]] In 2002, This Side came out and it was also produced by Alison Krauss. It reached #18 on the Billboard 200, and was also made gold by the RIAA.[7] This Side was different from the first album by adding more pop and rock. Chris Thile described the album in 2002:

"We're not content to just go a little farther. It's been three years since we recorded the first album, and I think people are forgetting that because all the attention has come in the last year. So the response is almost like, "Well, is it a concept record?" It certainly isn't; it's just who we are. People who ask that question have no concept of what we were like three years ago, before the first album came out. They also need to understand that [because of our youth], three years in our lives is a much larger percentage of how long we've lived. So there's going to be more change per year. We're growing and we're together all the time, so we're constantly trying to figure out new stuff."[8]

On the This Side tour of 2002 and 2003, Nickel Creek played shows as the main act for the most part, but also opened five shows for John Mayer in November 2002 in Upstate New York and New England,[9] and played with Gillian Welch and David Rawlings earlier in the year.[10] In 2003, Nickel Creek was on Béla Fleck's album Little Worlds.[11]

Nickel Creek also released three singles from This Side: "This Side", "Speak", and "Smoothie Song". "This Side" appeared on the US Country chart, but the others did not chart with Billboard. However, "Smoothie Song" topped the AAA Contemporary chart for three weeks.

Why Should the Fire Die?: 2005

Nickel Creek released Why Should the Fire Die? in August 2005. The album brought even more rock and pop to Nickel Creek's sound, just as This Side did. Chris Thile talked about the band's genre and style in a 2005 interview from JamBase: "We actually feel like more than a bluegrass band that stretched out. We are a band that incorporates bluegrass into our music. There's been a problem in perception. 'Bluegrass band leaves the fold' (uses a news announcer voice). No, no, no, no, no. Actually, it's a band that incorporates a little bluegrass into whatever the hell kind of music they play."[12] Sean Watkins also said:[13]

"Well, actually, I think this record that we’re doing, it’s not moving farther away from bluegrass, I mean – we’ve always been far away from our bluegrass roots, I don’t think this record is much farther away than the last one. It’s just different. This record – I think it sounds more like we do I think than anything we’ve ever done. It’s a lot more rock I think than our first two, and there’s some stuff that’s farther out than we’ve gone, and there’s some stuff that’s very, that’s more roots–oriented. So I wouldn’t say that the whole thing is farther away."

Farewell (For Now): 2006–2007

[[File:|thumb|right|Sara Watkins and Chris Thile on the Farewell (For Now) Tour in April 2007]] On August 28, 2006, Nickel Creek announced on their website that they would not be together as a band anymore. The message was:

"Dearest Listener, After seven years of extensive touring in support of three records (seventeen years as a band), we've decided to take a break of indefinite length at the end of 2007 to preserve the environment we've sought so hard to create and to pursue other interests. It has been a pleasure to write, record, and perform for you through the years and we'd like to heartily thank you for your invaluable contribution to our musical lives."[14]

After the break was announced, a tour was scheduled. To say goodbye to their fans, the tour was named the Farewell (For Now) Tour, because the band does not know if they will get together again. The tour started in April 2007 and ended in November 2007 in Nashville, Tennessee. The tour had many guest appearances by musicians like Fiona Apple, Glen Phillips, Jon Brion, Bruce Molsky, Béla Fleck, and Tift Merritt.

When talking about Nickel Creek's last tour before the break, Sara Watkins said "A lot of the other stuff will be special in the way that anything is special when you realize that it’s not going to be around forever... Nothing is going be Nickel Creek except Nickel Creek. I’m not looking for anything to top this. It can’t be duplicated in my life."[15]

Awards and nominations

Wins

Nominations

  • 2001: Grammy Award for Best Bluegrass Album (Nickel Creek)
  • 2001: Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance ("Ode to a Butterfly")
  • 2001: Country Music Association (CMA) Award for Best Vocal Group
  • 2001: CMA Horizon Award
  • 2005: Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album (Why Should the Fire Die?)
  • 2005: Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance ("Scotch & Chocolate")

Discography

Albums

Year Album
1993Little Cowpoke
1997Here to There
2000Nickel Creek
2002This Side
2005Why Should the Fire Die?
2006Reasons Why: The Very Best

Singles

Year Song Album
2001
  • "When You Come Back Down"
  • "The Lighthouse's Tale"
Nickel Creek
2002
  • "Reasons Why"
Nickel Creek
2003
  • "This Side"
  • "Speak"
  • "Smoothie Song"
This Side
2005
  • "When In Rome"
Why Should the Fire Die?

References

  1. "Nickel Creek dares to branch out". The Source Weekly. July 14, 2006. http://www.tsweekly.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=93&Itemid=1. Retrieved October 13, 2007. 
  2. "The Complete List of Non-Album Originals/Covers". nickelcreek.info. November 12, 2006. http://www.nickelcreek.info/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=6638. Retrieved October 13, 2007. 
  3. "Nickel Creek's Sean Watkins Blue Ridge Exclusive Interview". Blue Ridge. 2006. http://www.blueridgecountry.com/faces/seanwatkins.cfm. Retrieved October 13, 2007. 
  4. "Nickel Creek chart positions". All Music Guide. http://www.allmusic.com/album/r469755. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  5. Martens, Todd. "Grant, Gill Take Christmas On Tour". Billboard. September 21, 2001. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  6. Sara Watkins, Sean Watkins. "Nickel Creek Journals". Nickel Creek. August 17, 2000. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  7. "Nickel Creek Certified Gold". CMT. September 11, 2003. Retrieved November 18, 2007.
  8. "Nickel Creek Tackle Bluegrass Tradition and Pop Innovation on This Side". Barnes & Noble. August 16, 2002. Retrieved November 11, 2007.
  9. Jeckell, Barry A. "Mayer Taps Randolph, Nickel Creek For Fall Tour". Billboard. October 25, 2002. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  10. Sara Watkins. "Nickel Creek Journals". Nickel Creek. November 19, 2002. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  11. Jeckell, Barry A. "Flecktones Prep Ambitious Triple 'Worlds'". Billboard. June 12, 2003. Retrieved February 3, 2008.
  12. Dennis Cook. "Chris Thile: Bringing In Some New Blood". JamBase. http://www.jambase.com/headsup.asp?storyID=7300. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  13. Cara Ellen Modisett. "Nickel Creek's Sean Watkins Blue Ridge Exclusive Interview". Blue Ridge County. http://www.blueridgecountry.com/people/sean-watkins.html. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  14. "Nickel Creek Official Website". Nickel Creek. http://nickelcreek.com/. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  15. "Bluegrass group Nickel Creek says farewell (for now)". gotorenotahoe.com. http://www.gotorenotahoe.com/news/stories/html/2007/04/25/2944.php. Retrieved October 5, 2008. 
  16. "Top 10 Country Compilations of 2006". CMT. December 22, 2006. Retrieved February 19, 2008.

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