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Nintendo DSi
A text logo that contains "NINTENDO" in a squarish font with the "O" duplicated underneath itself, followed by "DS" in a rounder font and a superscripted "i" in a black disk.
An opened clamshell dual-screen handheld device. A camera is embedded in the internal hinge.
Manufacturer Nintendo
Product family Nintendo DS
Type Handheld game console
Generation Seventh generation era
Retail availability JP November 1, 2008[1]
AUS April 2, 2009[2]
EU April 3, 2009[3]
NA April 5, 2009[4]
Units shipped Worldwide: 16.43 million (as of December 31, 2009)[5] (details)
Media Nintendo DS Game Card, Secure Digital card (SD card), Secure Digital High Capacity card (SDHC card)[6]
CPU 2 ARM architecture processors[cn 1]
Storage capacity Cartridge save
256 MB internal flash memory
SD/SDHC card (up to 32 GB)[6]
Connectivity Wi-Fi (with WEP and WPA/2 support)
Online services Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection
DSi Shop
Nintendo Zone
Predecessor Nintendo DS Lite (concurrent)
Successor Nintendo DSi XL (concurrent, redesign)

The Nintendo DSi (ニンテンドーDSi?)[7] is a handheld game console produced by Nintendo. It is the third iteration of the Nintendo DS system, succeeding the Nintendo DS Lite. A seventh-generation console, it primarily shares the handheld market with Sony's PlayStation Portable.[8] Between 2008 and 2009, the console launched in Japan, Australasia (Oceania), Europe and North America. It is distributed in China by iQue, under the title "iQue DSi". A larger model with bigger screens, called the Nintendo DSi LL, was released in Japan on November 21, 2009. It was released as the Nintendo DSi XL in Europe on March 5, 2010 and will be released in North America on March 28, 2010.

Nintendo began development of the DSi in late 2006, and unveiled it during a Nintendo Conference in Tokyo on October 2, 2008. After the success of the DS Lite, Nintendo's goal was to narrow the gap between DS consoles per household and DS users per household. While the console's design is similar to that of the DS Lite, it includes the major addition of two interactive digital cameras, which may be incorporated into gameplay or simply used to take photographs. The console allows for internal and external content storage, and connects to an online store called the Nintendo DSi Shop. These new features are meant to facilitate personalization, in order to appeal to the individual members of a household.

The Nintendo DSi received generally positive reviews. While reviewers criticized its lack of exclusive software, they recommended the console to those who did not purchase prior DS models, due to its additions to the DS Lite design. CNET.com and PC World considered the DSi Shop to be the largest buying incentive for current DS owners.

Contents

History

Nintendo conceived a third iteration of the Nintendo DS handheld at the end of 2006, around the time of the Wii's release.[9] Following instructions from his supervisor, Masato Kuwahara of Nintendo's Engineering Department began development on the DSi project. During production, Kuwahara reported that his team had difficulty marketing the handheld, as it was based on—and meant to supplement—previously existing hardware. "We have to be able to sell the console on its own. It also has to be able to meld into the already-existing DS market," he said.[9] The handheld's cameras were considered early on: Satoru Iwata, president and CEO of Nintendo, said that the touchscreen was the console's sense of touch, and the microphone its "ears". A co-worker suggested that the device should have "eyes". Yui Ehara, the designer of the DSi's casing, advocated a change to the speaker apertures, because of the redundancy of the design's circular perforations. The team believed that this alteration signaled a clearer distinction between the DSi and its predecessors. Ehara wanted to include new features, but also to keep the unit "neat" and "simple".[9]

Due to demand from fan communities and Nintendo employees, the DSi's original design included two DS game card slots. However, speaking about the console's in-company unveiling in October 2007, Kuwahara said that "the response wasn’t that great, and, ... we’d sort of been expecting that". The secondary game card slot was removed, which slimmed the system by approximately 3 millimetres (0.12 in);[9] this version was revealed to the public at the October 2008 Nintendo Conference in Tokyo, along with its Japanese price and release date.[10] Since its release, the Nintendo DS Lite had surpassed the competition in yearly sales figures worldwide;[11][12] however, slowing sales of the console in Japan caused Nintendo to announce its new iteration. The company was less concerned with releasing the DSi in other territories, where market demand for the DS Lite remained high.[1][13]

Nintendo had developed 3-inch screens for the DS Lite, and the idea of a DS Lite with larger 3.8-inch screens advanced far enough that the company could have started mass production. However, the DS Lite's commercial success stalled its release, and the company later began efforts on the DSi. Iwata pitched the idea of a simultaneous release of a large and small version of the DSi, but Nintendo's hardware team was incapable of developing two versions concurrently. The DSi XL, a larger version of the DSi, has an improved viewing angle over its predecessor, which allows onlookers to see the screen's contents more easily. This feature was absent from the larger screened DS Lite due to cost issues.[14] After finishing work on the DSi, Kuwahara jump-started the DSi XL project and became project leader.[15] Various names for the DSi XL were considered, including "DSi Comfort," "DSi Executive," "DSi Premium", "DSi Living" and Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto insisted on calling it "DSi Deka" (Japanese for "large").[14]

Launch

The DSi was released in Japan on November 1, 2008, in matte black and matte white;[16] these same colors were available for its April 2, 2009 launch in Australia and New Zealand.[2] It was released in Europe on April 3 in the same colors, with a list price of £149.99,[3] and in the United States and Canada two days later, alongside the game Rhythm Heaven.[4] It was the first DS console to launch with multiple colors in North America[17]—matte black and matte blue, for US$169.99.[4] The console totaled 92,000 sales in its first two days on shelves in the United Kingdom.[18] According to GfK/Chart-Track data, the console had the fourth-best opening weekend ever in the UK, higher than previous records set by earlier DS iterations.[19] iQue released a Chinese version of the DSi in December 2009 with a pre-installed version of Nintendogs.[20] The Nikkei Sangyo Shimbun reported that this version has improved security to combat piracy.[21]

Demographic and sales

Sales figures
(as of December 31, 2009)[5]
Region Units shipped First available
Japan 4.66 million November 1, 2008
Americas 6.16 million April 5, 2009
Other regions 5.61 million April 2009
Total 16.43 million

Nintendo launched the Nintendo DS in 2004 to target a wider demographic than it had with its Game Boy line.[10] Satoru Iwata said that families often shared the DS and DS Lite;[11][22] the DSi was designed to facilitate personalization, in order to close the gap between DS users per household and DS owners per household.[11] The lower-case "i" character in "DSi" is symbolic of its two cameras, which represent "eyes", and of an individual person ("I"). The latter meaning contrasts the two lower-case "i" characters in "Wii", which represent players gathering together.[23]

Iwata said that the DSi is meant to be the first camera for children, and a means of social networking for older people.[24] A Nintendo representative said that the company "hope[s] that the Nintendo DSi becomes more than a game system and more of a personal tool to enrich our daily lives".[25] Shortly after the console's announcement, in response to media opinions, Iwata insisted that the new capabilities of the DSi are not meant to compete with mobile phones, the iPod or the PSP.[11]

The DSi frequently topped weekly sales charts in Japan during its first twelve months of availability and accounted for 40% of sales of its product line in the UK for 2009.[26][27] In the United States, the DSi's sales during its first three months of availability were greater than those achieved by the DS, DS Lite and Wii over the same timeframe.[28] The DS Lite and DSi maintained strong sales in the US throughout mid-2009; the DSi's first four months of availability saw a steady decline of its share of DS hardware sales from 80% to 54% and the launch of the DSi stabilized the average weekly sales rate of its product line to over 200,000 for seven months. Gamasutra estimated the DSi accounted for approximately 50% of sales of its product line for October 2009 and February 2010.[29][30] In an October 2009 interview, Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, announced that 2.2 million DSi units had been sold in the United States. He said, "If you give the consumer great value in terms of what they pay, they're willing to spend, and we say based on the experience of launching the DSi".[31] By December 31, 2009, the combined, worldwide total of Nintendo DS units shipped had reached 125.13 million.[5]

Hardware

View of the closed handheld. An embedded second camera at its top right corner, away from the hinge, faces the user.
A closed DSi; the second camera is visible.

The Nintendo DSi's design is similar to that of the Nintendo DS Lite, the second DS iteration. It has two TFT-LCD screens, which, at 82.5 millimetres (3.25 in), are larger than the 76.2 millimetres (3.00 in) screens of previous models.[32] The screens are capable of displaying 260,000 colors.[33] The lower display is overlaid with a touchscreen, which accepts input from the included stylus, or from the curved plastic tab attached to the optional wrist strap. The handheld features four lettered buttons (X, Y, A, B), a directional pad, and Start, Select, and Power buttons. Under the console's hinge are two shoulder buttons, a game card slot and a power cable input.[34] The DSi is 74.9 mm long × 137 mm wide × 18.9-mm tall (when closed), which is about 12% shorter (2.6 mm) than the Nintendo DS Lite, but slightly wider.[33][32]

The handheld has two VGA (0.3-megapixel) digital cameras. The first, placed on the internal hinge, points toward the user; the second is on the outer shell, and faces away from the user.[35] Another new feature is a SD card slot, set behind the cover on the handheld's right side. The power switch present on the DS Lite has been replaced by a power button, similar to that of the original Nintendo DS; however, the DSi's power button has extra functions, and is located on the bottom-left side of the touchscreen, rather than its top-left placement on the original DS.[9] The left side of the handheld features controls for adjusting volume and brightness; five brightness settings--one more than the DS Lite--are available. However, the console's battery life is shorter than that of the DS Lite, regardless of which brightness setting is selected;[36] for example, the DSi has a battery life of 9–14 hours on the lowest brightness setting, compared to the 15–19 hours of the DS Lite on the same setting.[37][38] The handheld uses an 840 mAh internal rechargeable battery, compared to 1000 mAh for the DS Lite,[36] and has a lifespan of approximately 500 charge cycles; after this point, it may be replaced by the user.[38]

The DSi has a matte surface to prevent the appearance of fingerprints, as opposed to the gloss finish of the DS Lite.[9] Standalone units are available in seven colors, but only the matte black and matte white models are available in all regions. The lime green color is only available in Japan,[39] and pink is available in Japan, North America, and Australasia.[40][41][42] The metallic blue color is available in Australasia, Japan, and Europe.[42][40][43] European countries received blue and red models on October 23, 2009.[43] Numerous special edition models and bundles have been released, including those for Ace Attorney Investigations: Miles Edgeworth, Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Echoes of Time, and the 2009 Black Friday shopping day.[44][45][46]

Technical specifications

A printed circuit board. A metal chassis and main electronic components dominate opposite ends of the PCB.
The DSi's main printed circuit board

The DSi's CPU and RAM are different from the DS Lite's.[47] The CPU was also relocated, and the battery housing was raised to fill the unused space. Due to the inclusion of Codec IC, which amplifies sound and converts digital signals to analog, the DSi's audio output is louder and higher quality than previous DS models.[9] Nintendo explained that the front Game Boy Advance (GBA) cartridge slot--present on earlier models--was removed to improve portability without sacrificing durability.[48] Because of its removal, the DSi is not backward compatible with GBA Game Paks. Accessories that require the GBA slot, such as the Nintendo DS Rumble Pak and the Guitar Hero: On Tour series guitar grip, are also incompatible.[49]

  • CPU: The DSi has two ARM architecture CPUs; ARM9 and ARM7.[cn 1] The ARM9 is clocked at 133 MHz (twice as fast as previous models).[47][50][51]
  • RAM: 16 MB of RAM (four times as much as previous models)[32]
  • Storage: 256 MB of internal flash memory[53] with a SD card (up to 2 GB) and SDHC card (up to 32 GB) expansion slot[6]
  • Wireless: 802.11b/g internal wireless connectivity[33]

Larger model

The Nintendo DSi XL (Nintendo DSi LL in Japan) was announced on October 29, 2009. It features larger screens, and a greater overall size, than the original DSi.[54][55] It is the fourth model of Nintendo DS, and marketed as the first "size variation" of its product family.[54][56] Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata said that cost restraints had limited the screen size and multiplayer aspects of portable game consoles. Nintendo stated that the DSi XL offers "an improved view angle on the screens," which makes it the first "portable system that can be enjoyed with people surrounding the gamer."[56] He argued that this introduces a new method of playing portable video games, wherein those "surrounding the game player can also join in one way or the other to the gameplay."[56]

While the original DSi was intended for individual use, Iwata suggested that buyers find a "steady place on a table in the living room" for the DSi XL, so that it would be shared by multiple members of a household.[56] With a weight of 314 grams, and measurements of 91.4 mm long × 161 mm wide × 21.2 mm tall, the DSi XL is the longest, widest and heaviest DS model.[57][58] It features two 4.2-inch screens, and has improved battery life over the DSi on all brightness settings; for example, batteries last 13–17 hours on the lowest level of brightness.[58] The console is bundled with two longer styli, one of which is thicker, rounded and pen-like.[54][33]

The DSi LL was released in Japan on November 21, 2009, with three available colors: dark brown (bronze), wine red (burgundy) and natural white.[54] The former two colors were available for its European launch on March 5, 2010[59] and will be available for its North American launch on March 28 for $189.99.[60] In Japan and North America, it is more expensive than the original DSi.[60][61] Nintendo sells the console to European retailers at a premium over the original DSi and let them decide on a price.[27] It features pre-installed software which varies by region, in addition to the Nintendo DSi Browser and Flipnote Studio which were later bundled with the original DSi.[59][60][62][63]

Features

The DSi supports external storage, which enhances its multimedia capabilities over previous models; pictures, downloaded software and AAC audio may be saved to SD cards.[64] The built-in "Nintendo DSi Sound" audio player allows for voice recording and music playback. Supported file formats include AAC, .mp4, .m4a, and .3GP; MP3 files are not supported.[65] While audio is playing, users may adjust pitch and playback, and add filters. Sound files may be listened to even when the DSi is shut, only if headphones are being used.[4] Users may save and modify up to eighteen ten-second sound clips from voice recordings (recorded via the internal microphone), and then apply them to songs.[36] The console also features the "Nintendo DSi Camera" software, which gives users ten tools (called "lenses") for modifying live video before taking pictures with the DSi camera.[66][67] Photographs taken with the DSi can be viewed on the Wii's Photo Channel using an SD Card, and, for DSi consoles with the 1.4 firmware update or greater, to the social networking website Facebook.[68][69][70]

Internet

The Nintendo DSi console can connect to the Internet through its built-in 802.11b/g Wi-Fi, or through a Nintendo Wi-Fi USB Connector; both methods give users access to the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service.[71] The DSi uses region locking for DSi-specific software; Nintendo has said that this is because the console's Internet services are tailored individually for each region, and because its parental controls system differs by country. Internet browsing, photo sharing and Nintendo DS cartridge software, however, are region-free.[72] The DSi supports WEP, WPA (AES/TKIP) and WPA2 (AES/TKIP) wireless encryption; the latter two may only be used by software where they are built-in, as the DS and DS Lite did not support these encryption types.[73][74][75]

Menu

Like the Wii, the DSi features a menu interface that displays applications as selectable icons.[76] The seven primary icons represent card software, Nintendo DSi Camera, Nintendo DSi Sound, Nintendo DSi Shop, DS Download Play, PictoChat and system settings; additional applications may be downloaded from the DSi Shop. Icons are set in a grid, navigated with the stylus or D-pad, and may be re-arranged via dragging-and-dropping.[77] The power button soft resets the console, which returns it to the main menu. An engineer from Nintendo's Developing Engineering Department, who relayed ideas from the company to the production team, commented that users "can move around, return to the menu, or play a different game, without shutting down the power every time" like the first two DS iterations had required.[9] DS cards can be hot swapped when the console is set to the main menu.[78]

Software library

Except for a few titles, such as the Guitar Hero: On Tour series, all DS games are compatible with the DSi.[79] Nintendo DSi-enhanced game cards contain DSi-exclusive features, but can still operate on previous console versions;[80][81] however, Nintendo DSi-exclusive game cards are not compatible with earlier DS systems.[79] The first DSi-exclusive retail game was System Flaw,[82] which was released in North America on October 27, 2009.[83] Homebrew flash cards designed for previous DS models are incompatible with the DSi,[35] but new cards capable of running DS software on a DSi have been created.[84]

Like the Wii, the DSi has upgradeable firmware,[17] and can connect to an online store. The store, called the DSi Shop,[53] allows users to download DSiWare games and applications, which are paid for with a Nintendo Points Prepaid Card (previously known as Wii Points Prepaid Card).[68] Certain applications are free, while others are priced 200, 500 or 800+ Nintendo Points—$2, $5 or $8+.[85] DSiWare purchases are locked to the system they were bought on unless the console is in need of repair or replacement by Nintendo.[86] A DSiWare trial campaign offers 1,000 Points to each DSi that accesses its shop application. This trial has an expiration date that varies by region. The DSi Shop launched with the DSi Browser, a free web browser developed by Opera Software and Nintendo.[87][88] Currently, Nintendo is not planning to offer Game Boy games through the DSi Shop.[79]

Reception

The Nintendo DSi's initial reviews were generally positive. Critics praised the majority of its changes to the DS Lite's aesthetic and functionality, but complained that it launched with insufficient exclusive software.[51][89][90][91][92] IGN's Craig Harris noted that, after five months on the Japanese market, both the DSi-exclusive software selection and DSi Shop were still lacking in content.[17] Jeff Bakalar of CNET.com said that owners of the first DS model should consider buying a DSi, but argued that, for DS Lite owners, the new system's only incentive was the DSi Shop.[88] PC World New Zealand's Jan Birkeland shared Bakalar's opinion, but believed that it was too early to judge the quality of the shop's software.[51] Many critics were disappointed by the absence of a slot for Game Boy Advance cartridges,[76][93][35][89][88] but others, such as PC World's Darren Gladstone, Bit-tech's Joe Martin, and IGN's Harris and Lowe, believed that it was a reasonable exchange for SD card support and the DSi Shop.[93][35][89] However, Bakalar stated, "We'd gladly give up the 4 millimeters [of thickness lost] to be able to play any Game Boy Advance game".[88]

Most reviewers criticized the quality of the DSi's cameras,[94][95] particularly for their resolution, which is lower than that of mobile phones.[93][17][35][90] They considered them sufficient for the DSi's screens, however.[51][95][96][92] Harris and Lowe believed that the cameras' only use was to take "silly pictures of yourself and others". They complained about the extreme difficulty of taking photographs in low-light environments, and said that even when an image was distinguishable, it was tinged green or blue.[89] Opinions varied on the DSi's photograph-editing software: Bit-tech's Martin and Reid considered the software a gimmick,[35][90] but Bakalar and Cliff Edwards of BusinessWeek thought otherwise.[88][76] Edwards saw the cameras' integration into gameplay as a new opportunity for developers; Martin did not think that the concept would be widely adopted, as he believed it to be "a gimmick that would alienate [...] DS Lite owners".[35][76] Eurogamer's Tom Bramwell speculated the DSi follows Game & Watch and Game Boy creator Gunpei Yokoi's philosophy of using dated technology developers are familiar with to introduce new game design concepts that are inexpensive enough for mass production at a profit. He argued its features are designed to "briefly entertain" early adopters while encouraging "developers to consider it as an alternative [of the DS Lite]" to build an attractive game library for the long term.[97]

Because of the DSi's additions to the DS Lite design, critics recommended the console to those who did not purchase previous DS models.[51][88][76][89][90][98] Pete Metzger of the Los Angeles Times considered the DSi to be "more like version 2.5 than a total reboot", but called its new features "worthwhile additions to an already great product".[98] PC World's Darren Gladstone gave the DSi a score of 75/100, and said that Nintendo "puts in smart nips and tucks to its already-svelte handheld while adding a raft of useful multimedia features".[93] Harris and Lowe defined the console's hardware redesign as "evolutionary", rather than "revolutionary".[89] After the DSi was unveiled, Goldman Sachs analyst Matthew J. Fassler called the DSi Shop a "tangible early threat" to big-box stores and retailers.[99] Martin believed that the cameras and DSi Shop did not justify purchasing the DSi at launch, but, in line with the general consensus, saw potential in future software for the console.[89][76][92][97][100][101]

Notes and references

Content notes
  1. ^ a b The DSi runs on ARM architecture listed by some third-parties as a ARM9.[50][51] Gartner, cited by ARM Holdings, lists a combination of a ARM9 and ARM7 processor.[52] The specific processor(s) have not been officially confirmed by ARM Holdings or Nintendo.
General
Specific
  1. ^ a b Patrick Klepek (2008-10-02). "New Nintendo DSi Won't Be Sold In U.S. Until 'Well Into 2009'". MTV Networks. New York City: Viacom. http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1596162/20081002/story.jhtml. Retrieved 2008-10-03. 
  2. ^ a b Cam Shea (2009-02-19). "Nintendo DSi – Date and Price Announced for AU". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/955/955135p1.html. Retrieved 2009-06-20. 
  3. ^ a b Michael French (2009-02-19). "Nintendo DSi hits Europe on April 3rd, priced £149.99". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/33291/Nintendo-DSi-hits-Europe-on-April-2nd-priced-14999. Retrieved 2009-02-25. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Nintendo DSi launches April 5 in the United States". Nintendo of America. Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. 2009-02-18. http://www.nintendo.com/whatsnew/detail/Q5D4ti_bPqJO_I0Oup0AMFudaUOLz6C7. Retrieved 2009-02-18. 
  5. ^ a b c "Consolidated Financial Highlights" (PDF). Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. 2010-01-28. pp. 9. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/pdf/2010/100128e.pdf#page=9. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  6. ^ a b c "Nintendo DSi – SD Cards". Nintendo of America. Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.com/consumer/systems/dsi/en_na/sdCards.jsp. Retrieved 2009-12-01. 
  7. ^ "ニンテンドーDSi" (in Japanese). Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ds/series/dsi/index.html. Retrieved 2009-11-10. 
  8. ^ Tom Bramwell (2009-04-06). "Sony PSP man slags off Nintendo DSi". Eurogamer. Brighton: Eurogamer Network. http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/sony-psp-man-slags-off-nintendo-dsi. Retrieved 2009-06-15. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h Masato Kuwahara, Yui Ehara & Kentaro Mita. Interview with Satoru Iwata. Nintendo DSi (Volume 1 – Hardware) (Transcript). Iwata Asks. Nintendo Minami-ku, Kyoto. Retrieved on 2009-02-21.
  10. ^ a b Satoru Iwata (2008-10-02). "Nintendo Conference Fall 2008". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. p. 1. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n10/conference2008fall/presen/e/index.html. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Corporate Management Policy Briefing / Semi-annual Financial Results Briefing". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. 2008-10-31. pp. 3, 5–6. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/081031/03.html. Retrieved 2009-06-20. 
  12. ^ "Corporate Management Policy Briefing / Semi-annual Financial Results Briefing". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. 2007-10-26. pp. 4–5. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/071026/04.html. Retrieved 2009-06-20. 
  13. ^ "Financial Results Briefing". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. 2008-04-25. p. 2. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/080425/02.html. Retrieved 2009-06-20. 
  14. ^ a b Anoop Gantayat (2009-12-15). "The Other DSi LL Names". Tokyo: Andriasang. http://www.andriasang.com/e/blog/2009/12/15/dsi_ll_names. Retrieved 2009-12-15. 
  15. ^ Masato Kuwahara, Amano & Yoneyama. Interview with Satoru Iwata. Nintendo DSi XL (The Phantom "Extra Large" Nintendo DS Lite) (Transcript). Iwata Asks. Nintendo Minami-ku, Kyoto. 2009. Retrieved on 2010-02-11.
  16. ^ Satoru Iwata (2008-10-02). "Nintendo Conference Fall 2008". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. p. 5. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n10/conference2008fall/presen/e/05.html. Retrieved 2009-09-23. 
  17. ^ a b c d Craig Harris (2009-07-06). "Nintendo DSi Interim Report". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. pp. 1–2. http://ds.ign.com/articles/100/1001445p1.html. Retrieved 2009-07-30. 
  18. ^ Tim Ingham (2009-04-07). "DSi sells 92,000 in two days". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/33849/DSi-sells-92000-in-opening-weekend. Retrieved 2009-04-09. 
  19. ^ Christopher Dring (2009-04-06). "DSi enjoys rampant demand in debut weekend". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/33844/DSi-enjoys-rampant-demand-in-opening-weekend. Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  20. ^ Anoop Gantayat (2009-12-08). "Chinese DSi Comes With Nintendogs Built In". Andriasang. http://www.andriasang.com/e/blog/2009/12/08/chinese_dsi. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  21. ^ Anoop Gantayat (2009-10-27). "Nintendo Plans DS Push". Andriasang. http://www.andriasang.com/e/blog/2009/10/27/nintendo_ds_push. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  22. ^ Kris Graft (2008-10-03). "Fils-Aime's "One DS Per Person" Goal". Edge. Bath, Somerset: Future plc. http://www.edge-online.com/news/fils-aimes-one-ds-per-person-goal. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  23. ^ McKinley Noble; Will Herring (2009-04-07). "Nintendo DSi: Launch Party @ Universal Studios". GamePro. San Francisco: IDG. http://www.gamepro.com/article/features/209600/nintendo-dsi-launch-party-universal-studios/. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  24. ^ "Nintendo DSi, new version of Nintendo DS, will come with camera, MP3 player". Daily News (New York). Associated Press (New York: Mortimer Zuckerman). 2008-10-02. http://www.nydailynews.com/money/2008/10/02/2008-10-02_nintendo_dsi_new_version_of_nintendo_ds_.html. Retrieved 2009-05-19. 
  25. ^ Adam Hartley (2009). "What does the 'i' in iPod and DSi mean?". Techradar. Bath, Somerset: Future plc. http://www.techradar.com/news/portable-devices/mp3-players/what-does-the-i-in-ipod-and-dsi-mean--534928. Retrieved 2009-02-25. 
  26. ^ Anoop Gantayat (2009-11-23). "DSi LL Launches in Japan". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/104/1048858p1.html. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  27. ^ a b Dave Roberts (2010-01-14). "Trade faces 'premium' DSi XL price". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/37130/Trade-faces-premium-DSi-XL-price. Retrieved 2010-02-27. 
  28. ^ Matt Casamassina (2009-08-10). "Nintendo Minute: 08.10.09". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/101/1012759p1.html. Retrieved 2009-12-12. 
  29. ^ Matt Matthews (2009-11-16). "NPD: Behind the Numbers, October 2009 (page 4)". Gamasutra. United States: United Business Media. http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/4192/npd_behind_the_numbers_october_.php?page=4. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  30. ^ Matt Matthews (2010-03-15). "NPD: Behind the Numbers, February 2010 (page 4)". Gamasutra. United States: United Business Media. http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/4299/npd_behind_the_numbers_february_.php?page=4. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
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  43. ^ a b "New colours for the Nintendo DSi". Nintendo of Europe. Großostheim: Nintendo. 2009-09-22. http://www.nintendo.co.uk/NOE/en_GB/news/2009/new_colours_for_the_nintendo_dsi_14609.html. Retrieved 2009-09-23. 
  44. ^ John Tanaka (2008-12-22). "Echoes of Time DSi Design Revealed". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/940/940383p1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  45. ^ Justin Haywald (2009-04-02). "Limited Edition Ace Attorney DSi Coming to Japan". 1UP.com. New York City: UGO Networks. http://www.1up.com/do/newsStory?cId=3173566. Retrieved 2009-06-11. 
  46. ^ Nintendo (2009-11-23). "Black Friday Nintendo Dsi Bundles Come Loaded With More Than $20 in Software Value". Press release. http://www.mcvuk.com/press-releases/53292/Nintendo-DSi-bundles. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 
  47. ^ a b Jeff Bakalar (2009-02-20). "Gaming preview: Who should buy the Nintendo DSi and who shouldn't". CNET.com. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. http://news.cnet.com/gaming-preview-who-should-buy-the-nintendo-dsi-and-who-shouldnt/. Retrieved 2009-03-18. 
  48. ^ Satoru Iwata (2008-10-02). "Nintendo Conference Fall 2008". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. p. 2. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n10/conference2008fall/presen/e/02.html. Retrieved 2009-09-23. 
  49. ^ Craig Harris (2008-10-17). "DSi: Bye Bye GBA Slot". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. pp. 1–2, 4. http://ds.ign.com/articles/921/921239p2.html. Retrieved 2009-02-22. 
  50. ^ a b "Nintendo DSi specifications". CNET.com. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. http://reviews.cnet.com/consoles/nintendo-dsi-black/4507-10109_7-33319298.html. Retrieved 2010-03-17. 
  51. ^ a b c d e f Jan Birkeland (2009-05-26). "Nintendo DSi: Handheld console". PC World (New Zealand: Fairfax Media). http://pcworld.co.nz/pcworld/pcw.nsf/reviews/C38AEE5112690F4ECC2575C1000A4FBE. Retrieved 2010-02-06. 
  52. ^ "Nintendo DSi – ARM Powered Product". Cambridge: ARM Holdings. http://www.arm.com/markets/home/nintendo-dsi.php. Retrieved 2010-03-17. 
  53. ^ a b Anoop Gantayat (2008-11-01). "DSi Versus The Internet". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://uk.ds.ign.com/articles/926/926277p1.html. Retrieved 2009-02-22. 
  54. ^ a b c d Tor Thorsen (2009-10-29). "DSi XL hits US & EU Q1 2010, DS sales top 113 million". GameSpot. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. http://www.gamespot.com/news/6238345.html. Retrieved 2009-10-29. 
  55. ^ Christopher Dring (2009-10-29). "Nintendo reveals DSi LL". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/36286/Nintendo-reveals-DSi-LLrn. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  56. ^ a b c d "Corporate Management Policy Briefing / Semi-annual Financial Results Briefing". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. 2009-10-30. pp. 9–10. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/091030/09.html. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  57. ^ Anoop Gantayat (2006-02-10). "DS Lite Colors Revealed". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/687/687783p1.html. Retrieved 2009-12-03. 
  58. ^ a b "ニンテンドーDSi LL:スペック" (in Japanese). Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ds/dsiLL/spec.html. Retrieved 2009-11-09. 
  59. ^ a b Dave Roberts (2010-01-14). "Nintendo DSi XL to launch on March 5th". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/37129/DSi-XL-gets-March-5th-launch. Retrieved 2010-02-25. 
  60. ^ a b c Michael Thompson (2010-02-25). "Nintendo shows off new DSi, digital games push at summit". Ars Technica. Chicago: Condé Nast Publications. http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2010/02/nintendo-summit-2010.ars. Retrieved 2010-03-01. 
  61. ^ Chris Kohler (2009-10-29). "Nintendo DSi XL Has Big Screens, Bundled Apps". Wired News. United States: Condé Nast Publications. http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2009/10/nintendo-dsi-xl/. Retrieved 2009-11-24. 
  62. ^ Chris Leyton (2009-10-29). "Nintendo Announces DSi LL News". Total Video Games. United Kingdom: TVG Media Ltd. http://www.totalvideogames.com/Nintendo-DS/news/Nintendo-Announces-DSi-LL-14707.html. Retrieved 2009-11-24. 
  63. ^ Masato Kuwahara, Amano & Yoneyama. Interview with Satoru Iwata. Nintendo DSi XL (They Saw the Screen and Shouted: "It's Huge!") (Transcript). Iwata Asks. Nintendo Minami-ku, Kyoto. 2009. Retrieved on 2010-02-11.
  64. ^ Sarju Shah (2009-04-03). "Nintendo DSi Hands-On". GameSpot. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. p. 1. http://www.gamespot.com/features/6201087/index.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  65. ^ Nintendo (2009), p. 47.
  66. ^ Nintendo (2009), pp. 29–31.
  67. ^ Craig Harris (2008-11-05). "IGN: Nintendo DSi Hands-on". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. p. 2. http://ds.ign.com/articles/927/927128p2.html. Retrieved 2009-03-18. 
  68. ^ a b Satoru Iwata (2008-10-02). "Nintendo Conference Fall 2008". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. p. 3. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n10/conference2008fall/presen/e/03.html. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 
  69. ^ Jim Reilly (2009-06-02). "E3 2009: DSi Getting Facebook Update". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/989/989371p1.html. Retrieved 2009-06-03. 
  70. ^ "Nintendo DSi - Facebook integration with the Nintendo DSi Camera". Nintendo of America. Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.com/consumer/systems/dsi/en_na/facebook.jsp. Retrieved 2010-01-24. 
  71. ^ Nintendo (2009), pp. 76–79.
  72. ^ Tom Bramwell (2008-10-06). "Nintendo DSi software region-locked". Eurogamer. Brighton: Eurogamer Network. http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/nintendo-dsi-software-region-locked. Retrieved 2009-02-25. 
  73. ^ "Wireless Home Router Support". Nintendo of America. Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.com/consumer/wfc/en_na/ds/wrWEPkeyHelp.jsp. Retrieved 2009-07-03. 
  74. ^ 青山, 畑山 & 藤原. Interview with Satoru Iwata. 社長が訊く「ニンテンドーWi-Fiネットワークアダプタ (Transcript). Iwata Asks. Nintendo Minami-ku, Kyoto. 2008. Retrieved on 2009-09-24.
  75. ^ Nintendo (2009), p. 94.
  76. ^ a b c d e f Cliff Edwards (2009-04-10). "Nintendo's New DSi: Well Worth the Money". BusinessWeek (New York City: McGraw-Hill). http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/apr2009/tc2009049_147316.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  77. ^ Nintendo (2009), pp. 24–25.
  78. ^ "Ten Things You Didn’t Know About DSi". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/dsi/did-you-know.html. Retrieved 2009-03-24. 
  79. ^ a b c "Nintendo DSi - Frequently Asked Questions (What games can be played on the Nintendo DSi?)". Nintendo of America. Redmond, Washington: Nintendo. http://www.nintendo.com/consumer/systems/dsi/en_na/faq.jsp. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  80. ^ Craig Harris (2009-09-22). "Yes, DSi Carts are Region Locked". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/102/1027349p1.html. Retrieved 2009-09-23. 
  81. ^ Ubisoft (2009-04-06). "Ubisoft Supports The Nintendo DSi With My Cooking Coach". Press release. http://ds.ign.com/articles/969/969992p1.html. Retrieved 2009-07-02. 
  82. ^ Michael McWhertor (2009-10-21). "System Flaw Is Actually The First DSi-only Game". Kotaku. Los Angeles: Gawker Media. http://kotaku.com/5386752/system-flaw-is-actually-the-first-dsi+only-game. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  83. ^ Storm City Entertainment (2009-10-14). "Storm City Entertainment Announces Upcoming Release of System Flaw, a Nintendo DSi Exclusive Title". Press release. http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS167966+14-Oct-2009+BW20091014. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  84. ^ Chistopher Dring (2008-12-04). "Hackers crack the DS". Market for Home Computing and Video Games. United Kingdom: Intent Media. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/32587/Hackers-crack-the-DS. Retrieved 2009-02-25. 
  85. ^ Craig Harris (2008-10-07). "DSi: Just the Facts (And a Little Speculation)". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://ds.ign.com/articles/917/917200p2.html. Retrieved 2009-11-19. 
  86. ^ Robert Purchese (2009-09-30). "Nintendo DSi software region-locked". Eurogamer. Brighton: Eurogamer Network. http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/dsiware-buys-are-non-transferrable. Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  87. ^ Satoru Iwata (2008-10-02). "Nintendo Conference Fall 2008". Minami-ku, Kyoto: Nintendo. p. 4. http://www.nintendo.co.jp/n10/conference2008fall/presen/e/04.html. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 
  88. ^ a b c d e f Jeff Bakalar (2009-04-05). "CNET editors' review". CNET.com. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. http://reviews.cnet.com/nintendo-dsi/. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  89. ^ a b c d e f g Craig Harris; Scott Lowe (2009-04-06). "Nintendo DSi Review". IGN. Brisbane, California: Fox Interactive Media. http://gear.ign.com/articles/970/970172p1.html. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  90. ^ a b c d Rory Reid (2009-03-16). "Nintendo DSi review". CBS Interactive. CNET.com UK. http://reviews.cnet.co.uk/gamesconsoles/0,139102148,49301534,00.htm. Retrieved 2009-09-12. 
  91. ^ Joe Martin (2009-03-17). "Nintendo DSi Review". bit-tech.net. United Kingdom: Dennis Publishing. p. 3. http://www.bit-tech.net/gaming/dsi/2009/03/17/nintendo-dsi-review/3. Retrieved 2009-03-20. 
  92. ^ a b c Ben Kuchera (2009-04-04). "The toy that roared: Ars reviews the DSi". Ars Technica. Chicago: Condé Nast Publications. p. 2–3. http://arstechnica.com/gaming/reviews/2009/04/where-were-going-we-wont-need-stores-ars-reviews-the-dsi.ars/2. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  93. ^ a b c d Darren Gladstone (2009-04-01). "Nintendo DSi Review: Slimmer, More Multimedia-Savvy". PC World (United States: IDG). http://www.pcworld.com/article/162366/nintendo_dsi_review_slimmer_more_multimediasavvy.html. Retrieved 2009-04-20. 
  94. ^ Victor Godinez (2009-04-10). "Loaded but limited - Nintendo DSi features Web access, 2 cameras - and a few problems". The Dallas Morning News (Dallas: A. H. Belo). 
  95. ^ a b Lou Kesten (2008-10-02). "Game Review: DSi adds cameras, downloads to - Nintendo's portable". Daily News (New York). Associated Press (Batavia (city), New York: Johnson Newspaper Corporation). 
  96. ^ Sarju Shah (2009-04-03). "Nintendo DSi Hands-On". GameSpot. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. p. 2. http://www.gamespot.com/features/6201087/p-3.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 
  97. ^ a b Tom Bramwell (2009-03-06). "Nintendo DSi: A defence". Eurogamer. Brighton: Eurogamer Network. http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/nintendo-dsi-article?page=1. Retrieved 2010-03-06. 
  98. ^ a b Pete Metzger (2009-04-05). "Review: Nintendo DSi offers evolutionary, not revolutionary, upgrade over DS Lite". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2009/04/nintendodsireviewconsole.html. Retrieved 2009-07-13. 
  99. ^ Jack Loftus (2009-03-17). "Nintendo president Iwata: iPhone? What iPhone?". Macworld. United Kingdom: IDG. http://www.macworld.co.uk/ipod-itunes/news/index.cfm?newsid=23042. Retrieved 2009-11-25. 
  100. ^ Joe Martin (2009-03-17). "Nintendo DSi Review". bit-tech.net. United Kingdom: Dennis Publishing. p. 3. http://www.bit-tech.net/gaming/dsi/2009/03/17/nintendo-dsi-review/3. Retrieved 2009-05-14. 
  101. ^ Sarju Shah (2009-04-03). "Nintendo DSi Hands-On". GameSpot. San Francisco: CBS Interactive. p. 4. http://www.gamespot.com/features/6201087/p-4.html. Retrieved 2009-09-25. 

External links

Official websites

Directories


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Category:Nintendo DS article)

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Nintendo DS
The console image for Nintendo DS.
Manufacturer Nintendo
Active 2004—present
Total Games 468 (255 present)
← Game Boy Advance (none) →
Popular guides
  1. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl
  2. Chrono Trigger
  3. Spectrobes
  4. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass
  5. Animal Crossing: Wild World
  6. Super Mario 64 DS
  7. Metroid Prime Hunters
  8. Freshly-Picked Tingle's Rosy Rupeeland
  9. Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness
  10. Mario Kart DS

The Nintendo DS is Nintendo's current generation high-end handheld. It features dual screens arranged vertically, the lower of which is touch-sensitive for input, with 3D graphics approximately on par with the Nintendo 64, and backwards compatibility with Game Boy Advance games. It also has a microphone and wireless Wi-Fi for local and Internet multiplayer play.

Nintendo DS Lite
The console image for Nintendo DS Lite.
Manufacturer Nintendo
Active 2006—present
Nintendo DSi
The console image for Nintendo DSi.
Manufacturer Nintendo
Active 2008—present

The Nintendo DS Lite is the lighter, sleeker version of the DS. It also has brighter screens than the original, with different levels of brightness.

Nintendo has released new DS, the DSi, which has a web browser and a slot for an SD card. It is also 12% slimmer than the DS Lite and has larger screens. It also plays downloadable DSiWare games.

See also

  • DS-Play, a Nintendo DS community website.
  • FriendCodes, a website dedicated to finding players over Wi-Fi for the Wii an DS.
  • DS Linux, a group trying to put the Linux operating system on the DS.

(previous 200) (next 200)

Subcategories

This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total.

D

N

Pages in category "Nintendo DS"

The following 198 pages are in this category, out of 253 total.

A

  • Ace Attorney Investigations: Miles Edgeworth
  • Advance Wars: Days of Ruin
  • Advance Wars: Dual Strike
  • Ancient Land of Ys
  • Animal Crossing: Wild World
  • Animal Paradise
  • Anno 1404
  • Another Code: Two Memories
  • Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney
  • Asphalt: Urban GT
  • Asphalt: Urban GT 2
  • Assassin's Creed: Altaïr's Chronicles
  • Avalon Code

B

C

D

E

F

  • 2006 FIFA World Cup
  • Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer
  • Fashion Designer: Style Icon
  • Fashion Dogz
  • Feel the Magic: XY/XX
  • Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Echoes of Time

F cont.

G

H

I

J

K

L

  • The Legend of Spyro: Dawn of the Dragon
  • The Legend of Spyro: The Eternal Night
  • The Legend of Spyro: A New Beginning
  • The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks
  • The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass
  • Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures
  • Lego Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy
  • LostMagic
  • Luminous Arc
  • Lunar Knights

M

M cont.

N

O

P

R

S

(previous 200) (next 200)

Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Nintendo DSi
Manufacturer Nintendo
Type Handheld
Release Date November 1, 2008 JP

April 2, 2009 AU
April 3, 2009 EU
April 5, 2009 US

Media DS Card, SD Card
Save Format Save to game card
Input Options Touch screen, voice recognition, 2 camer

as

Special Features Wi-Fi capabilities
Units Sold {{{unitssold}}}
Top Selling Game {{{topgame}}}
Variants Nintendo DS
Nintendo DS Lite
Competitor(s) {{{competitors}}}
Predecessor Nintendo DS Lite
Successor TBA


The third version of the Nintendo DS. The system was announced at the Nintendo Conference on October 2, 2008 in the city of Tokyo, Japan.

Contents

Information

  • 2 Cameras to take pictures.
  • SD Card for storing profiles.
  • Sound Editor to change your voice and music.
  • Picture Editor to edit pictures.
  • Moving Notepad for making animations.
  • Internet Browser
  • Flash Memory
  • DSiWare for downloading games.
  • Mii Support

Specifications

The Nintendo DSi is about 12% thinner (2.6 mm) than the Nintendo DS Lite. The new handheld has two VGA (0.3 megapixel) digital cameras; one on the internal hinge pointed towards the user and the second one on the outside of the shell.

It also has larger screens (3.25 inches, up from 3 inches) and improved speakers. The power switch has been replaced with a power button, as the original DS had, now located next to the bottom left side of the touch screen. The DSi has five brightness settings compared to the DS Lite's four; however, battery life is reduced to 14 hours on the lowest brightness setting compared to the 19 hours in its predecessor. The internal rechargeable battery may still be replaced by the user at the end of its useful life of (typically) several hundred charge/discharge cycles.

A new SD card slot is utilized for external storage of pictures and downloaded software and to play AAC audio. The front slot for Game Boy Advance (GBA) cartridges has been removed, thus removing the unit's backward compatibility and its compatibility with accessories that require the GBA slot, such as the Nintendo DS Rumble Pack, as well as the Guitar Hero: On Tour and Guitar Hero: On Tour Decades grip, which is essential for those games. The removal of backward compatibility also prevents games such as Pokémon Diamond and Pearl from accessing saved data stored on GBA cartridges. The DSi has 256 MB of internal flash memory. Photos can be synced to the Wii's Photo Channel.

All existing flash cards for the Nintendo DS and DS Lite are incompatible with DSi; however, Acekard has produced a new flashcard designed for DSi called the Acekard 2i. Similar to its competitor, the PlayStation Portable, and Nintendo's home console, Wii, the DSi will have upgradable firmware. This is a first for a Nintendo handheld system.

It has been reported that the DSi utilizes region locking for DSi-specific software, since it provides Internet services tailored individually for each region, but the DSi itself does not have region lock-outs, so Nintendo DS games from any region can be played. In addition, the DSi uses rating-based parental controls, which differ by country. The WPA and WPA2 support is not backward compatible with original DS games. Only DSi services can use WPA.

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Nintendo DSi. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Wikia Gaming, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 (unported) license. The content might also be available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.

Releases

It was released in November 1, 2008 in Japan for ¥18,900 in frosted black and polar white. For North America, the sales of the Nintendo DS Lite were still strong, so it will be released in April 5 2009 with the price of $170. For Australia it will be released in April 2 2009. For Europe, the release date is April 3 2009.

External links

  • Official Nintendo DSi Japanese Website
  • Official Nintendo DSi Australia Website
  • Official Nintendo DSi UK Website
  • Official Nintendo DSi US Website

See Also

Stub
This article is a stub. You can help by adding to it.

Stubs are articles that writers have begun work on, but are not yet complete enough to be considered finished articles.


This article uses material from the "Nintendo DSi" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

File:NIntendo
A black Nintendo DSi

The Nintendo DSi (ニンテンドーDSi Nintendō Dīesuai?)[1] is the third version of the Nintendo DS handheld.[2] It was first available in Japan in December 2008, and in other regions in April 2009.

Contents

Features

The DSi is about 12% thinner (2.6 mm) and the screen is about 17% bigger than the Nintendo DS Lite.[2][3] It has two Video Graphics Array (or VGA) 0.3 megapixel [2][4] digital cameras; one is pointed at the user and the other is in the outer shell.[5][6][7][8] The power switch is now a power button like the original Nintendo DS instead of a switch and is moved to the bottom to make it harder to bump by accident. It will no longer have a slot to play Game Boy Advance games in and one will not be able to play games such as Guitar Hero: On Tour on the DSi because the game requires the slot.

Differences between Nintendo DS lite and Nintendo DSi

  • Bigger Screen : The DSi Screen is one quarter of an inch bigger than the DS lite screen.
  • Lighter : The DSi is 4 grams lighter than the Nintendo DS lite.
  • Battery Life : The battery lasts between 1-5 hours less than the DS lite.
  • Extra memory : The Nintendo DSi has a SD card* slot, on which photos and music can be stored.
  • No Gameboy Game Slot : The DSi cannot play Gameboy and Gameboy Advance games; this caused a lot of disappointment when it came out.
  • Camera : The DSi has two cameras, one on the inside (with poor quality) and one on the outside (with better quality), and the photos can be put on the SD card* and later printed.
  • Music Player : The DSi has a AAC player, for playing music, much like an iPod does.
  • Internet : The DSi has an internet browser that cannot watch videos, but can do everything else.

* An "SD card" is a type of memory card.

References

Other websites








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