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Nita Lowey


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 18th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 1993
Preceded by José Serrano

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 20th district
In office
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1993
Preceded by Joseph J. DioGuardi
Succeeded by Benjamin A. Gilman

Born July 5, 1937 (1937-07-05) (age 72)
New York City
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Stephen Lowey
Residence Harrison, New York
Alma mater Mount Holyoke College
Occupation U.S. Representative
Religion Jewish

Nita M. Lowey (born July 5, 1937) is a politician from the U.S. state of New York.

Lowey was born in the Bronx in New York, New York and she graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a bachelor's degree. She served as a government official before entering elected politics and was once the Assistant Secretary of State of New York.

Lowey was first elected to the House of Representatives from the New York 20th district as a Democrat in 1988 and now serving in the 18th district. Her district is located in the northern suburbs of New York City and includes most of Westchester County including New Rochelle, White Plains, Chappaqua, Greenburgh, Scarsdale, Tarrytown, Mamaroneck, Ossining, and part of Yonkers, as well as part of eastern Rockland County, including the county seat New City, Haverstraw, and Congers. She used to represent parts of Queens and the Bronx, until redistricting after the 2000 U.S. Census created her current district.

In 2001–2002, Lowey was the first female chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. She is currently a member of the House Homeland Security Committee and the House Appropriations Committee. She is the Chair of the Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee.

Lowey strongly considered running for the United States Senate in 2000, but stepped aside when First Lady of the United States Hillary Rodham Clinton announced her candidacy. Congresswoman Lowey was considered a top contender for appointment to Clinton's Senate seat after Clinton was nominated to be Secretary of State, but in a December 1st, 2008 phone interview with the Associated Press, she stated that she isn't interested in giving up her seniority seat on the House Appropriations Committee.[1]

Lowey hasn't had a hard time keeping her seat, and was re-elected to an eleventh term in 2008. In 2004, Lowey received 69% of the vote against political neophyte Richard A. Hoffman, a Wall Street Investor and largely self-funded candidate who ran on a platform of opposing special interests and cutting federal taxes. Lowey emphasized her track record on homeland security issues, notably her work to reform the formula for distributing homeland security grants to states. In 2006, also against Hoffman, Lowey won with 70%. She captured 68% of the vote in 2008 against Republican Jim Russell.

She received an "A" on the Drum Major Institute's 2005 Congressional Scorecard on middle-class issues. She received 12% on the Club for Growth's 2007 congressional scorecard.[2].

She was strongly critical of the Stupak-Pitts Amendment, which places limits on taxpayer-funded abortions in the context of the November 2009 Affordable Health Care for America Act.

Contents

Legislative Record

Lowey has had a "progressive" voting record. A notable cause supported by her is public broadcasting, and she appeared at a congressional hearing with Sesame Street characters Bert and Ernie in support of funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Congresswoman Lowey has been a vocal advocate for a Security Council Resolution on the conflict in Darfur. She is responsible for the $500 million in the Emergency Spending Bill for Aid in Darfur. She is also pushing for $1.2 Billion in the next fiscal year. She also consistently votes with the predominate Democratic majority in the House. [3].

Lowey voted for HR 2454, so called "Cap and Trade" legislation. [4]

Lowey voted for HR 1105. the 2009 Budget Bill.

Political Style

Instead of holding a public Town Hall meeting with her constituents to present her point of view on Health Care reform, Lowey elected to hold a pre-screened telephone conference call, the effectiveness of which was questioned by some of her constituents. [5]

Committee assignments

Personal life

Nita Lowey has been married to Stephen Lowey for over 45 years. Stephen Lowey is a named partner in the law firm of Lowey Dannenberg Cohen & Hart, P.C., which is located in White Plains, NY. According to the West Corporation, his practice areas include Securities Law, Antitrust Law, and Consumer Protection. Nita and Stephen Lowey have three children, and eight grandchildren.

External links

References

  1. ^ http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/C/CLINTON_SUCCESSOR?SITE=CASRP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
  2. ^ http://www.clubforgrowth.org/2008/05/the_2007_congressional_scoreca.php
  3. ^ http://www.heritage.org/research/budget/wm2595.cfm
  4. ^ http://aboutpolitics.com/politicians/New%20York-NY/Lowey/Budget,%20Spending%20and%20Taxes
  5. ^ http://polhudson.lohudblogs.com/2009/08/07/are-telephone-town-hall-meetings-democratic/
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph J. DioGuardi
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 20th congressional district

1989–1993
Succeeded by
Benjamin A. Gilman
Preceded by
Jose Serrano
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 18th congressional district

1993 – present
Incumbent
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