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No. 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron RAF
Active 12 September 1925 - 15 July 1945
10 May 1946 - 10 March 1957
1 July 2006 - present
Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Branch Ensign of the Royal Air Force.svg Royal Air Force
Part of Royal Auxiliary Air Force
Motto Latin: Cave leonem cruciatum
("Beware the tormented lion")
Battle honours Home Defence 1940-1945; Battle of Britain 1940; Fortress Europe 1940-1944; Channel and North Sea 1940-1943; Dieppe; France and Germany 1944-1945; Normandy 1944.
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Al Deere, Paddy Finucane
Insignia
Squadron Badge In front of a saltire, a lion rampant[1]The lion was adopted in view of the squadron's association with Scotland and the saltire to represent the cross of St Andrew, being fimbriated to show it as a white saltire on a blue background.[2]
Squadron Codes ZT (May 1939 - Sep 1939)
LO (Jan 1939 - May 1939, Sep 1939 - May 1945, 1949 - 1953)
RAI (May 1946 - 1949)

No. 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron was a British Auxiliary Air Force squadron.[3] Originally formed as a light bomber squadron, its role changed later to army co-operation and fighter squadron. During World War II the squadron flew Spitfires and played amongst others a role in the Battle of Britain. After the war the squadron was reinstated as a fighter squadron within the Royal Auxiliary Air Force until all these units disbanded in March 1957. Upon reformation in 2006 it got a force-protection role and is no longer a flying squadron.

Contents

Formation and early years

Formed at RAF Renfrew on 15 September 1925 as a light bomber squadron in the Auxiliary Air Force, and initially equipped with Airco DH.9As. These were replaced by Fairey Fawns in 1927, Westland Wapitis in 1929, Hawker Harts in 1934 and finally Hawker Hinds in 1936. It continued in the light bomber until 1 November 1938 when it was redesignated an Army Co-operation unit. This was however not for long and on 14 January 1939, the squadron became a fighter squadron. It had received Hawker Hectors in the November, but re-equipped with Gloster Gauntlets on conversion to the fighter role. These were short-lived as Spitfires arrived in May 1939.

World War II

Like No. 603 Squadron RAF, it spent the early part of the war and Battle of Britain on defensive duties in Scotland, but in August 1940 it moved south to join the Battle, returning to Scotland in December. It moved south again in July 1941, remaining for a year before returning to its native Scotland. Another move came in January 1943, this time to the South-West, where in April it joined the newly forming 2nd Tactical Air Force. It briefly returned to Scotland from January to March 1944, when it returned south prior to taking part in the invasion of Europe.

From the end of June 1944, it operated from advanced airfields in Normandy, following the Army's advance into Belgium until September, when it returned to the UK. From here it carried out operations against V2 sites in Holland until disbanding on 15 May 1945 at RAF Coltishall.

Post-war

With the reactivation of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, No. 602 was reformed on 10 May 1946 at RAF Abbotsinch as a day fighter squadron. It was initially equipped with Spitfire F.14s and later with F.21s and F.22s, until January 1951 when Vampire FB.5s were received. It also acquired some F.3s in August 1953, which it flew alongside the FB.5s until February 1954. FB.9s arrived in November 1954 and the squadron continued to fly both types (FB.5 and FB.9s) until, along with all the flying units of the RAuxAF, it was disbanded on 10 March 1957.

Present role

The squadron was reformed on 1 July 2006, when the mission support element of No 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron was separated to form a new unit. The role of 602 Squadron is to provide mission support to Nimrods and other surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft at RAF Kinloss, RAF Waddington and other deployed locations at home and overseas. The Squadron trains Flight Operations Officers, Flight Operations Managers and Flight Operations Assistants to supplement the regular RAF flight operations staff in this task.[4]

Aircraft operated

From To Aircraft Version
October 1925 January 1928 Airco DH.9A
September 1927 September 1929 Fairey Fawn
July 1929 April 1934 Westland Wapiti Mk.IIa
February 1934 June 1936 Hawker Hart
June 1936 January 1939 Hawker Hind
November 1938 January 1939 Hawker Hector Mk.I
January 1939 May 1939 Gloster Gauntlet Mk.II
May 1939 June 1941 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I
May 1941 August 1941 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa
August 1941 September 1943 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb
September 1942 October 1942 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Va
September 1942 October 1942 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VI
October 1942 April 1943 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vc
From To Aircraft Version
September 1943 January 1944 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IXb
January 1944 March 1944 Supermarine Spitfire LF.Vb
March 1944 August 1944 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IXb
August 1944 September 1944 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IXe
September 1944 November 1944 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IXb
November 1944 May 1945 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. XVI
August 1946 August 1947 Supermarine Spitfire F.14
April 1947 May 1951 Supermarine Spitfire F.21
June 1948 January 1951 Supermarine Spitfire F.22
January 1951 March 1957 de Havilland Vampire FB.5
August 1953 February 1954 de Havilland Vampire F.3
November 1954 March 1957 de Havilland Vampire FB.9

[5][6][7][8]

Commanding officers

From To Name
September 1925 February 1926 S/Ldr. C.N. Lowe, MC, DFC
February 1926 1928 S/Ldr. J.D. Latta, MC
1928 June 1931 S/Ldr. J. Fullerton
June 1931 1936 S/Ldr. Lord Clydesdale
1936 January 1939 S/Ldr. D.F. McIntyre, AFC
January 1939 March 1940 S/Ldr. A.D. Farquhar, DFC
March 1940 July 1940 S/Ldr. Pinkerton, DFC
July 1940 June 1941 S/Ldr. A.V.R. Johnstone, DFC
June 1941 August 1941 S/Ldr. P.E. Meagher
August 1941 January 1942 S/Ldr. A.C. Deere, DFC & Bar
January 1942 June 1942 S/Ldr. B.E. Finucane, DSO, DFC & Bar
June 1942 October 1942 S/Ldr. P.M. Brothers, DFC
October 1942 October 1943 S/Ldr. M.F. Beytagh, DFC
October 1943 July 1944 S/Ldr. R.A. Sutherland
July 1944 August 1944 S/Ldr. J.J. Le Roux, DFC & 2 Bars
August 1944 September 1944 S/Ldr. A.R. Stewart
September 1944 May 1945 S/Ldr. R.A. Sutherland, DFC
1946 1950 S/Ldr. M. Robinson, AFC
1950 1952 S/Ldr. H.M. Stephen, DSO, DFC
1952 December 1953 S/Ldr. J.A. Forrest
December 1953 1956 S/Ldr. R.B. Davidson, DFC
1956 March 1957 S/Ldr. C.D. Bartman

Squadron bases

From To Base
12 September 1925 20 January 1933 Renfrew
20 January 1933 7 October 1939 Abbotsinch
7 October 1939 13 October 1939 Grangemouth
13 October 1939 14 April 1940 Drem
14 April 1940 28 May 1940 Dyce
28 May 1940 13 August 1940 Drem
13 August 1940 17 December 1940 Westhampnett
17 December 1940 15 April 1941 Prestwick
15 April 1941 10 July 1941 Ayr
10 July 1941 14 January 1942 Kenley
14 January 1942 4 March 1942 Redhill
4 March 1942 13 May 1942 Kenley
13 May 1942 17 July 1942 Redhill
17 July 1942 16 August 1942 Peterhead
16 August 1942 20 August 1942 Biggin Hill
20 August 1942 10 September 1942 Peterhead
10 September 1942 20 January 1943 Skaebrae
20 January 1943 14 April 1943 Perranporth
14 April 1943 29 April 1943 Lasham
29 April 1943 1 June 1943 Fairlop
1 June 1943 1 July 1943 Bognor
1 July 1943 13 August 1943 Kingsnorth
13 August 1943 12 October 1943 Newchurch
From To Base
12 October 1943 18 January 1944 Detling
18 January 1944 12 March 1944 Skaebrae
12 March 1944 13 March 1944 Detling
13 March 1944 20 March 1944 Llanbedr
20 March 1944 18 April 1944 Detling
18 April 1944 25 June 1944 Ford
25 June 1944 13 August 1944 B.11 Longues-sur-Mer
13 August 1944 2 September 1944 B.19 Lingèvres
2 September 1944 5 September 1944 B.40 Nivillers
5 September 1944 17 September 1944 B.52 Douai
17 September 1944 29 September 1944 B.70 Deurne
29 September 1944 18 October 1944 Coltishall
18 October 1944 20 November 1944 Matlaske
20 November 1944 19 February 1945 Swannington
19 February 1945 23 February 1945 Coltishall
23 February 1945 5 April 1945 Ludham
5 April 1945 15 May 1945 Coltishall
10 May 1946 30 July 1949 Abbotsinch
30 July 1949 15 April 1951 Renfrew
15 April 1951 14 July 1951 Leuchars
14 July 1951 14 June 1954 Renfrew and Abbotsinch
14 June 1954 10 March 1957 Abbotsinch

[5][6][7][8]

References

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Notes

  1. ^ Halley 1988, p. 418.
  2. ^ http://www.raf.mod.uk/history/602squadron.cfm
  3. ^ http://www.rafweb.org/Sqn600-604.htm
  4. ^ Page for present 602 sqn on RAF website
  5. ^ a b Moyes 1976, p. 274.
  6. ^ a b Rawlings 1978, pp. 479-480.
  7. ^ a b Halley 1988, p. 419.
  8. ^ a b Jefford 2001, p. 99.

Bibliography

  • Cameron, Dugald. Glasgow's own: History of 602 (City of Glasgow) Squadron. Glasgow, Scotland: Squadron Prints, 1987.
  • Deere, Al. Nine Lives. London: Hodder, 1959 (republished in 1969 by Coronet, 1991 by Wingham Press and last in 2004 by Crécy Publishing). (Autobiographical 1941-43) * Halley, James J. The Squadrons of the Royal Air Force & Commonwealth, 1981-1988. Tonbridge, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 1988. ISBN 0-85130-164-9.
  • Jefford, Wing Commander C.G., MBE,BA,RAF (Retd). RAF Squadrons, a Comprehensive Record of the Movement and Equipment of all RAF Squadrons and their Antecedents since 1912. Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK: Airlife Publishing, 2001. ISBN 1-84037-141-2.
  • Johnstone, Sandy. Enemy in the Sky. London: William Kimber, 1976 (republished in 1979 by Presidio press, ISBN 0-8914-1086-4).
  • McRoberts, Douglas. Lions Rampant: the Story of 602 Spitfire squadron. London: William Kimber, 1985. ISBN 0-7183-0572-8.
  • Nancarrow, F.G. Glasgow's fighter squadron: 602 Squadron RAF. Collins, 1942.
  • Rawlings, John D.R. Coastal, Support and Special Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Jane's Publishing Company Ltd., 1982. ISBN 0-7106-0187-5.
  • Rawlings, John D.R. Fighter Squadrons of the RAF and their Aircraft. London: Macdonald and Jane's (Publishers) Ltd., 1978. ISBN 0-354-01028-X.
  • Robinson, Anthony. RAF Squadrons in the Battle of Britain. London: Arms and Armour Press Ltd., 1987 (republished 1999 by Brockhampton Press, ISBN 1-86019-907-0.).
  • Smith, Richard C. Al Deere: Wartime Fighter Pilot, Peacetime Commander: The Authorised Biography. London: Grub Street, 2003. ISBN 1-9040-1048-2.
  • Stokes, Doug. Paddy Finucane, Fighter Ace: A Biography of Wing Commander Brendan E. Finucane, D.S.O., D.F.C. and Two Bars. London: William Kimber & Co. Ltd., 1983. ISBN 0-71830-279-6. (republished Somerton, Somerset: Crécy Publishing, 1992, ISBN 0-947554-22-X).

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