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North Island
Māori: Te Ika-a-Māui
NZNorthIsland.png
Geography
North Island is located in New Zealand
North Island (New Zealand)
Location New Zealand
Coordinates 38°24′S 175°43′E / 38.4°S 175.717°E / -38.4; 175.717
Area 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi) (14th)
Highest point Mount Ruapehu (2,797 metres (9,177 ft))
Country
New Zealand
Largest city Auckland (pop. 1,333,300)
Demographics
Population 3,287,600 (as of June 2009 estimate)
Density 28.9 /km2 (75 /sq mi)

The North Island (Māori: Te Ika-a-Māui) is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the South Island by Cook Strait. The island is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi) in area,[1] making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,287,600 (June 2009 estimate).[2]

Eight important cities are in the North Island, notably New Zealand's largest city, Auckland, New Plymouth, Tauranga, Gisborne, Napier, Hamilton, Palmerston North and Wellington, the capital, located at the southern extremity of the island. Approximately 76% of New Zealand's population lives in the North Island.

Contents

Naming and usage

Although the island has been known as the North Island for many years,[3] the New Zealand Geographic Board has found that, along with the South Island, it has no official name. The board intends to make North Island the island's official name, along with an alternative Māori name. Although several Māori names have been used, Maori Language Commissioner Erima Henare sees Te Ika-a-Māui as the most likely choice.[4]

The definite article is used with the names of the North and South islands, as the North Island and the South Island, like the North Sea and the Western World, but unlike Rangitoto Island or West Point. Maps, headings or tables and adjectival expressions use North Island, whereas the North Island is used after a preposition or before or after a verb, e.g. my mother lives in the North Island, the North Island is smaller than the South Island, or I'm visiting the North Island. When specifying that the island is where a place, person, or object is located, it is normal to use the word in rather than on, for example Hamilton is in the North Island.

Māori mythology

According to Māori mythology, the North and South Islands of New Zealand arose through the actions of the demigod Māui. Māui and his brothers were fishing from their canoe (the South Island) when he caught a great fish and pulled it from the sea. While he was not looking his brothers fought over the fish and chopped it up. This great fish became the North Island and thus a Māori name for the North Island is Te Ika-a-Māui (The Fish of Māui). The mountains and valleys are said to have been formed as a result of Māui's brothers' hacking at the fish. Until the early 20th Century, an alternative Māori name for the North Island was Aotearoa. In present Māori usage, Aotearoa is a collective name for New Zealand as a whole.

Ecology

North Island has an extensive flora and bird population, with numerous National Parks and other protected areas. Hamilton Ecological District is an example of a smaller protected area within a national park unit.

Regions of the North Island

Nine local government regions cover the North Island and all its adjacent islands and territorial waters.

Cities and towns in the North Island

Smaller urban areas are found on the List of towns in New Zealand, as are components of larger metropolitan area.

Geographic features

Notes

  1. ^ Statistics New Zealand Geography - physical features
  2. ^ "Subnational Population Estimates: At 30 June 2009". Statistics New Zealand. 23 October 2009. http://www.stats.govt.nz/methods_and_services/access-data/tables/subnational-pop-estimates.aspx. Retrieved 2009-10-23.  
  3. ^ On some 19th century maps, the North Island is named New Ulster, which was also a province of New Zealand that included the North Island.
  4. ^ Isaac Davison, North and South Islands officially nameless, New Zealand Herald, 22 April 2009. Accessed 22 April 2009.


Coordinates: 38°24′S 175°43′E / 38.4°S 175.717°E / -38.4; 175.717

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Oceania : New Zealand : North Island
Contents

The North Island of New Zealand is warm, with scenery ranging from sandy beaches, through rolling farmland to active volcanic peaks. Although it is smaller than the South Island, it is more populous, with half of the New Zealand population living north of Lake Taupo, in the middle of the island.

Hahei Beach near Coromandel
Hahei Beach near Coromandel
Thermal Pool in Rotorua
Thermal Pool in Rotorua
Chateau Tongariro
Chateau Tongariro
Wairere Boulders, the world unique natural phenomenon of Northland
Wairere Boulders, the world unique natural phenomenon of Northland
Come to the Hokianga and play Sisiphus, the Koutu Boulders might be the biggest concretions in the world!
Come to the Hokianga and play Sisiphus, the Koutu Boulders might be the biggest concretions in the world!
Top of sand dune, forming the northern part of the Hokianga Heads
Top of sand dune, forming the northern part of the Hokianga Heads
  • Whangarei - The central and only city in Northland
  • Auckland - The largest and most populated NZ city and the largest city in Polynesia.
  • Hamilton - home of the Waikato River.
  • Tauranga - In the Bay of Plenty.
  • Rotorua - Famous for geysers and hot pools... and that funny sulphuric smell! (smells like eggs!)
  • Hastings and Napier - Art Deco and wine in the sunny Hawkes Bay.
  • New Plymouth -
  • Wanganui - Once a port town, now gateway to the Whanganui river
  • Palmerston North - Knowledge capital of New Zealand, has over 70 educational institutes, that roughly one per 1000 population
  • Wellington - The national capital - home of the Parliament and the Beehive. The Windy city (and its not hot air).
  • Auckland - Is the primary arrival point for most people in New Zealand a large majority of those coming in through the Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) which handles 70% of all tourist air travel and is serviced by most major airlines. A significant number of people also arrive in Auckland by cruise ship.

Get around

The North Island is adequately serviced by many national bus companies.

  • Newmans Coach Lines [1] operates a premium sightseeing tours throughout the North Island.
  • InterCity Coachlines [2] is New Zealand's national coach company and operates over 150 services to more than 600 destinations nationwide.
  • Nakedbus.com [3] is the cheap alternative to Intercity with tickets starting from $1 - book early and get bargin bus travel. They do not have quite as many routes or services as Intercity but are catching up fast.
  • Overnight Cruise with Bay of Islands Rock Cruises Overnight Cruise Cruise the Bay of Islands for 22 hours.
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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

North Island

Proper noun

North Island

  1. One of the two major islands making up New Zealand.

Translations

See also


Simple English

The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the South Island by Cook Strait. The island is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi) in area,[1] making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,287,600 (June 2009) It is also called by its Māori name, Te Ika-a-Māui.

Twelve cities are in the North Island. Two are Auckland, New Zealand's largest city, and Wellington, the capital which is at the southern end of the island. About 76% of New Zealand's population live in the North Island.

References

  1. Statistics New Zealand Geography - physical features


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