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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

North Yorkshire
EnglandNorthYorkshire.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
Origin 1974
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
(Part of the ceremonial county is in the North East Region)
Area
- Total
Ranked 1st
8,654 km2 (3,341 sq mi)
Admin HQ Northallerton[1]
ISO 3166-2 GB-NYK
ONS code 36
NUTS 3 UKE22
Demography
Population
- Total (2005)
- Density
- Admin. council
- Admin. pop.
Ranked 15th
1,073,200
125 /km2 (324/sq mi)
Ranked 19th
599,300
Ethnicity 97.9% White
1.0% S.Asian
Politics
Arms of North Yorkshire County Council
North Yorkshire County Council
http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
North Yorkshire Ceremonial Numbered.png
  1. Selby
  2. Harrogate
  3. Craven
  4. Richmondshire
  5. Hambleton
  6. Ryedale
  7. Scarborough
  8. City of York (Unitary)
  9. Redcar and Cleveland (Unitary)
  10. Middlesbrough (Unitary)
  11. Stockton-on-Tees (Unitary)
    (the part south of the Tees)

Neighbouring counties are: County Durham, East Riding of Yorkshire, Cumbria, Lancashire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire

North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. Created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972[2] it covers an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi), making it the largest ceremonial county in England. The majority of the Yorkshire Dales and all of the North York Moors lie within North Yorkshire's boundaries, and around 40% of the county is covered by National Parks.

Contents

Divisions and environs

The area under the control of the county council, or shire county, is divided into a number of local government districts; they are Craven, Hambleton, Harrogate, Richmondshire, Ryedale, Scarborough and Selby.[3]

The Department for Communities and Local Government did consider reorganising North Yorkshire County Council's administrative structure by abolishing the seven district councils and the county council to create a North Yorkshire unitary authority. The changes were planned to be implemented no later than 1 April 2009.[4][5] This was rejected on 25 July 2007 so the County Council and District Council structure will remain.[6]

The largest settlement in the administrative county is Harrogate, while in the ceremonial county it is York.

York, Middlesbrough and Redcar and Cleveland are unitary authority boroughs which form part of the ceremonial county for various functions such as the Lord Lieutenant of North Yorkshire, but do not come under county council control. Uniquely for a district in England, Stockton-on-Tees is split between North Yorkshire and County Durham for this purpose. Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees, and Redcar and Cleveland boroughs form part of the North East England region.[7]

The ceremonial county area, including the unitary authorities, borders East Riding of Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cumbria and County Durham.

Physical features

Within North Yorkshire are the North York Moors and most of the Yorkshire Dales; two of eleven areas of countryside within England and Wales to be officially designated as national parks. Between the North York Moors in the east and the Pennine Hills in the west lie the Vales of Mowbray and York. The Tees Lowlands lie to the north of the North York Moors and the Vale of Pickering lies to the south. Its eastern border is the North sea coast. The highest point is Whernside, on the Cumbrian border, at 736 metres (2,410 ft) [8]. The three major rivers in the county are the River Swale, River Ure and the River Tees. The Swale and the Ure form the River Ouse which flows through York and into the Humber estuary. The Tees forms the border between North Yorkshire and County Durham and flows from upper Teesdale to Middlesbrough and Stockton and to the coast.

History

North Yorkshire was formed on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, and covers most of the lands of the historic North Riding, as well as the northern half of the West Riding, the northern and eastern fringes of the East Riding of Yorkshire and the former county borough of York.

York became a unitary authority independent of North Yorkshire on 1 April 1996,[9] and at the same time Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland and areas of Stockton-on-Tees south of the river became part of North Yorkshire for ceremonial purposes, having been part of Cleveland from 1974 to 1996.

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added for North Yorkshire at current basic prices with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.[10]

Year Regional Gross Value Added[11] Agriculture[12] Industry[13] Services[14]
1995 7,278 478 2,181 4,618
2000 9,570 354 2,549 6,667
2003 11,695 390 3,025 8,281

Education

North Yorkshire LEA has a mostly comprehensive education system with 42 state schools secondary (not including sixth form colleges) and 12 independent schools.

Towns and villages

Italicised locations lie outside the current North Yorkshire shire county.

Places of interest

Italicised locations lie outside the current North Yorkshire shire county.

News and Media

The County is served by BBC North East and Cumbria, and for more southerly parts of the county BBC Yorkshire. Yorkshire Television and Tyne Tees Television are also received in most areas of the County. BBC Tees is broadcast to northern parts of the county, whist BBC Radio York is broadcast more widely. BBC Radio Leeds is broadcast to southern parts of the county.

Transport

There are only two main motorways that run through North Yorkshire and they are the A1(M) and the A66(M). A small stretch of the M62 motorway also runs through North Yorkshire, close to Eggborough.[3] The other main non-motorway routes are the A1, the A19 and the A66.

The East Coast Main Line, of which East Coast, First TransPennine Express and Grand Central are the principal passenger rail operators on the line. Northern Rail operate the remaining branch lines in the county including those services from York to Harrogate, Scarborough to Hull, Darlington to Saltburn and the Esk Valley Line from Middlesbrough to Whitby. Last but certainly not least, the Settle-Carlisle Line runs through the far west of the county with services again operated by Northern. The county suffered very badly under the Beeching cuts of the 1960s which saw places like Richmond, Ripon, Tadcaster, Helmsley, Pickering and the Wensleydale communities wiped from the railway map. Other notable closures were the Whitby to Scarborough, York to Driffield and the secondary main line between Northallerton and Harrogate via Ripon. The Malton to Whitby line which closed in 1965 was reopened by preservationists between Pickering and Grosmont in 1973 to form what we now know as the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The Wensleydale Railway is another success story with plans to fully reinstate the link between Northallerton and Garsdale on the Settle - Carlisle line which ran through Hawes. The line presently operates services between Leeming Bar and Redmire but they hope to be able to access Northallerton station, on the busy East Coast Main Line, as soon as an agreement can be made with the railway authorities. Another notable reinstatement project in the county is a plan to reopen the Harrogate - Ripon line. York is the largest station in the county with 11 platforms and is a major tourist attraction in its own right. The station is immediately adjacent to the world famous National Railway Museum.

Bus services also run daily; most are controlled by Arriva, Harrogate & District, Scarborough & District, Yorkshire Coastliner, First and the local Dales & District. In York, FirstGroup run a park and ride service as well as normal bus routes around the city. There are no major airports in the county itself but Durham Tees Valley in County Durham, Newcastle Airport and Leeds Bradford International Airport are the closest.

Sports

North Yorkshire is home to several football clubs, the most successful of which is Middlesbrough FC who play in the Coca-Cola Championship; others include York City FC who have played in the Football League but today play in the Conference National. Whitby Town FC have reached the FA cup first round seven times, and have played the likes of Hull City, Wigan and Plymouth Argyle , they currently play in the Unibond Premier league. No notable rugby union teams hail from the county but York City Knights are a rugby league team and play in the Rugby League National League 2. North Yorkshire is home to many racecourses; these include Catterick Bridge, Redcar, Ripon and Thirsk. It also has one motor racing circuit, Croft Circuit; the circuit holds meetings of the British Touring Car Championship, British Superbike and Pickup Truck Racing race series. Yorkshire County Cricket Club, play a number of fixtures at North Marine Road, Scarborough.

References

  1. ^ "North Yorkshire County Council : Contact us". www.northyorks.gov.uk. http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=42. Retrieved 2009-05-16.  
  2. ^ Arnold-Baker, C., Local Government Act 1972, (1973)
  3. ^ a b "Transport map of shire county divided into districts" (PDF). North Yorkshire County Council. http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=514&p=0. Retrieved 2008-10-10.  
  4. ^ "New council for North Yorkshire". North Yorkshire County Council. http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/public/site/NYCC/menuitem.72980bf1db3dfb9fd7428f1040008a0c/?vgnextoid=cfa68f0788110110VgnVCM100000420f1cacRCRD.  
  5. ^ "Proposals for future unitary structures: Stakeholder consultation" (PDF). Communities and Local Government. http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/localgovernment/pdf/322770.pdf. Retrieved 2008-10-10.  
  6. ^ "Decision letter: North Yorkshire County Council" (PDF). Communities and Local Government. http://www.communities.gov.uk/pub/59/DecisionletterNorthYorkshireCountyCouncil_id1512059.pdf.  
  7. ^ North East Assembly - List of local authorities and members
  8. ^ http://bubl.ac.uk/org/tacit/marilyns/chapter6.htm
  9. ^ OPSI - The North Yorkshire (District of York) (Structural and Boundary Changes) Order 1995
  10. ^ "Regional Gross Value Added" (PDF). Office for National Statistics. 2005-12-21. pp.  240–253. http://www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_economy/RegionalGVA.pdf. Retrieved 2008-10-06.  
  11. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  12. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  13. ^ includes energy and construction
  14. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

North Yorkshire is a region and administrative county within the Yorkshire in northern England. North Yorkshire covers most of the lands of the traditional North Riding, as well as the northern half of the old West Riding and the northern and eastern fringes of the traditional East Riding. It is the largest county in England.

Regions

North Yorkshire contains the the North York Moors and most of the Yorkshire Dales, two of twleve areas of countryside within England and Wales to be officially designated as a National Park. Also, North Yorkshire can act as a ceremonial county, in which case it contains the unitary authorities of York, Redcar and Cleveland, and Middlesbrough.

Map of North Yorkshire
Map of North Yorkshire
  • Appletreewick - delightful village on Troller's Beck, a tributary of the Wharf. Parceval Hall Gardens are worth a visit [1]
  • Austwick - near Clapham and close to unspoiled limestone pavements.
  • Clapham - one of the points for starting up Ingleborough - passing Ingleborough cavern and Gaping Gill, a deep pothole sometimes open to public visits by a boatswain's chair.
  • Gayle - a small village near Hawes that is home to Wensleydale cheese making and is the site of Gayle Mill. This mill, having come only third in the BBC's 'Restoration' programme, has now raised the necessary funding under its own steam and is now open to the public.
  • Grassington - one of the best known villages of the lower part of Wharfedale.
  • Hubberholme - a very small village in Langstrothdale where the chuch has an unusual rood loft and where the ashes of JB Priestley were scattered.
  • Ingleton - fairly large village on the west side of the Dales with an excellent waterfalls walk - unfortunately subject to a charge!
  • Keld, Muker and Reeth - pleasant villages in lovely Swaledale.
  • Kettlewell - in Wharfedale with good walks to Littondale and over the hills or by the Wharfe to Grassington.
  • Malham - small village near Settle with terrific limestone scenery - notably Malham Cove, Gordale Scar and Janet's Foss (a waterfall).
Malham Cove

Other destinations

2 World famous National Parks:

  • North York Moors fantastic scenery
  • Yorkshire Dales more great scenery
  • Nidderdale - which for some unimaginable reason is not included in the Yorkshire Dales National Park.
  • Brimham Rocks - extraordinary rock outcrops - site owned by National Trust.

[2]

Abbeys

North Yorkshire has some striking examples of former abbeys, most of which were destroyed at the time of the dissolution under Henry VIII, although the nave of Bolton Priory is still intact because it served as the parish church.

  • Bolton Priory - beautifully situated by the Wharfe with excellent walks and extensive area where children can play (as opposed to a 'play area!') [3]
  • Byland Abbey between Thirsk and Helmsley [4]
  • Fountains Abbey - near Ripon - owned by the National Trust along with the neighbouring Studeley Royal estate. [6] These are possibly the most impressive remains of all.
  • Jervaux Abbey- in Wensleydale below Leyburn - these remains are perhaps the scantiest but
  • Rievaulx Abbey - [7]

Get in

It is possible to enter Harrogate by train from either Leeds or York, and by bus from Leeds or various towns in the area, such as Wetherby and Knaresborough. The nearest airport is Leeds/Bradford International Airport (LBA) but it is also relatively easy to enter the country through Manchester Airport (MAN). There is also rail from Leeds or Bradford to Skipton and Settle, leading to the scenic Settle - Carlisle railway. Scarborough is accessible by rail from Leeds or York. Northallerton is on the main line from York to Edinburgh.

Get around

All areas of Harrogate can be easily reached by road, and most areas can be reached by bus using the Harrogate & District local bus service from the bus station in the town centre. Most of the attractions in Harrogate are within walking distance of most of the hotels in town centre.

Each of the national parks has a preserved railway. In the Dales there is the Embsay and Bolton Abbey Steam Railway [8] and the North York Moors has the North Yorkshire Moors Railway from Pickering to Grosmont with connections to Whitby. [9]

Eat

Monty's Grill Chophouse, St Peters Grove, York Tel. 01904 640099, [10]. Open 7 days a week for luncheon and dinner, this restaurant based in York provides a simple but delightful menu ranging from oysters, T-bone steak and lobster. The Angel, Hetton The Old Sweet Shop A delicios wonderland filled with all kinds of sweets!

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Proper noun

Singular
North Yorkshire

Plural
-

North Yorkshire

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. (from 1974) A county in north east England, comprising the North Riding of Yorkshire as well as parts of the West and East Ridings.

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
North Yorkshire
Image:EnglandNorthYorkshire.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
Origin 1974
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
(part of ceremonial county in North East)
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
- Admin. area
Ranked 1st
8,654 km²
Ranked 1st
8,038 km²
Admin HQ Northallerton
ISO 3166-2 GB-NYK
ONS code 36
NUTS 3 UKE22
Demographics
Population
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
- Admin. pop.
Ranked 15th Image:Wp_globe_tiny.gif
1,061,300


123

/ km²
Ranked 19th Image:Wp_globe_tiny.gif
591,600
Ethnicity 97.9% White
1.0% S.Asian
Politics

North Yorkshire County Council
http://www.northyorks.gov.uk/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
Image:North Yorkshire Ceremonial Numbered.png
  1. Selby
  2. Harrogate
  3. Craven
  4. Richmondshire
  5. Hambleton
  6. Ryedale
  7. Scarborough
  8. City of York (Unitary)
  9. Redcar and Cleveland (Unitary)
  10. Middlesbrough (Unitary)
  11. Stockton-on-Tees (Unitary)
    (the part south of the Tees)

North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. Created in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972 [1] it covers an area of 8,654 km², making it the largest county in England.

Contents

Divisions and environs

The area under the control of the county council, or shire county, is divided into a number of local government districts; they are Craven, Hambleton, Harrogate, Richmondshire, Ryedale, Scarborough and Selby. [2]

The Department for Communities and Local Government did consider reorganising North Yorkshire County Council's administrative structure by abolishing the seven district councils and the county council to create a North Yorkshire unitary authority. The changes were planned to be implemented no later than 1 April 2009.[3][4] This was rejected on 25 July 2007 so the County Council and District Council structure will remain.[5]

York, Middlesbrough and Redcar and Cleveland are unitary authority boroughs which form part of the ceremonial county for various functions such as the Lord Lieutenant of North Yorkshire, but do not come under county council control. Uniquely for a district in England, Stockton-on-Tees is split between North Yorkshire and County Durham for this purpose. Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar and Cleveland boroughs form part of the North East England region. [6]

The area including the unitary authorities, or ceremonial county, borders East Riding of Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cumbria and County Durham.

Physical features

Within North Yorkshire are the North York Moors and most of the Yorkshire Dales; two of eleven areas of countryside within England and Wales to be officially designated as a national park. The highest point is Whernside, on the Cumbrian border, at 2414 feet (736 m).

History

North Yorkshire was formed on 1 April, 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, and covers most of the lands of the historic North Riding, as well as the northern half of the West Riding, the northern and eastern fringes of the East Riding of Yorkshire and the former county borough of York.

York became a unitary authority independent of North Yorkshire on 1 April 1996, [7] and at the same time Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland and areas of Stockton-on-Tees south of the river became part of North Yorkshire for ceremonial purposes, having been part of Cleveland from 1974 to 1996.

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of North Yorkshire at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added[8] Agriculture[9] Industry[10] Services[11]
1995 7,278 478 2,181 4,618
2000 9,570 354 2,549 6,667
2003 11,695 390 3,025 8,281

Education

North Yorkshire LEA has a mostly comprehensive education system with 42 state schools (not including sixth form colleges) and 12 independent schools, including Ampleforth College and Harrogate Ladies' College. However, the grammar schools outstrip the independent schools in academic performance. North Yorkshire is a rural county, and public transport may not be up to scratch in many places, so reaching the secondary schools (mostly in larger towns) will be a struggle. Sixth-form provision varies with all except one school in Selby and Scarborough districts having no sixth form, although the other districts fare much better. The schools having no sixth forms in the rural areas tend to be much smaller schools in remote areas. Separate sixth form colleges can often perform far better than those attached to schools in all due respect. Skipton has virtually a fully selective education system with two single sex grammar schools and secondary modern schools. The Harrogate district has the largest school population by year, followed by Scarborough, with Richmondshire and Ryedale the smallest. School year sizes are either about 250 or 100 (in the rural areas), with the two largest schools in Northallerton and Scarborough. In England at GCSE on average, 45.8% of pupils gain 5 good GCSEs including English and Maths; for North Yorkshire's 7300 pupils taking GCSE at 16 it is 53.5% - the highest for a traditional county in the north of England. The Harrogate area performs much better than York at GCSE. The church schools, as elsewhere in England, also do well, notably St. Aidan's C of E High School, which gets the best results for a comprehensive in the county in 2006 with 89%, getting results similar to a grammar school. The next best is Harrogate Grammar School on 82% and the St John Fisher Catholic High School on 73%. The Manor C of E School in York also gets very good results (but doesn't have a sixth form). The three best schools at GCSE are in Harrogate. The worst by far is the Risedale Sports and Community College in Hipswell, next door to the Catterick Garrison. At A-level, the grammar schools not only do the best in North Yorkshire, but in the Yorkshire and Humber region as well, and most of the north of England. The A-Level results of 2006 placed Ermysted's Grammar School, Skipton as the best school in the whole of Yorkshire, beating many prestigious independent schools. The top comprehensives at A level are the two sixth forms in Harrogate - the church schools and Harrogate Grammar School, producing fantastic results for comprehensives - better than Ampleforth College. Overall, North Yorkshire gets one of the highest A level averages in England, and again the best in the north of England for traditional counties. York also performs above the England average. The independent Bootham School in York gets better results than all except one of the grammar schools, and York's Huntington School gets better A level marks than Harrogate's excellent comprehensives (yet produces unremarkable GCSE results).

GCSE results by district council (%)

2006 GCSE results showing proportion of pupils gaining 5 grades A-C including English and Maths.

  • Harrogate 63.6
  • Craven 58.5
  • Hambleton 57.3
  • Ryedale 50.0
  • (City of York Unitary Authority 48.8)
  • Richmondshire 47.4
  • Scarborough 45.2
  • Selby 43.0

Towns and villages

Part of a series of articles on
Yorkshire
County Town: York
The ridings:
East • North • West
Ceremonial counties
East Riding of Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
Further information
Accent & Dialect
Anthem
Culture
Famous People
History
Places
White Rose
Yorkshire Day 1 August

Italicised locations lie outside the current North Yorkshire shire county.

Places of interest

References

  1. ^ Arnold-Baker, C., Local Government Act 1972, (1973)
  2. ^ North Yorkshire County Council - Transport map of shire county divided into districts
  3. ^ North Yorkshire County Council - New Council for North Yorkshire
  4. ^ Communities and Local Government - Proposals for future unitary structures: Stakeholder consultation
  5. ^ Decision letter: North Yorkshire County Council
  6. ^ North East Assembly - List of local authorities and members
  7. ^ OPSI - The North Yorkshire (District of York) (Structural and Boundary Changes) Order 1995
  8. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  9. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  10. ^ includes energy and construction
  11. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

External links



This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at North Yorkshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

This article uses material from the "North Yorkshire" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

[[File:|right|framed|A map showing where North Yorkshire is in England (coloured red).]]

File:Bolton Abbey
Bolton Abbey

North Yorkshire is a large county in the region called Yorkshire and the Humber in the north of England.

North Yorkshire was part of one bigger county called Yorkshire. The three parts of Yorkshire used to be called the West Riding, the East Riding, and the North Riding. in 1974, the boundaries and names changed. The "North Riding" changed to "North Yorkshire". The other main parts of Yorkshire are now South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The main city of North Yorkshire is York. York is now (since 1996) a unitary authority, it is not officially part of North Yorkshire.

Yorkshire has many towns. It also has many open green areas and hills, so two of the 11 UK national parks (the North York Moors and most of the Yorkshire Dales) are in North Yorkshire.


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