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Since about 2001 there has been considerable discussion about an imminent nuclear power industry revival or nuclear renaissance. However, the current global financial crisis and other problems are making this difficult to achieve in practice.[1][2][3]

In 2007, nuclear power plants generated some 2600 TWh of electricity and provided 14 per cent of the electricity used in the world, which represented a fall of 2 per cent compared with 2006.[4]

As of August 1, 2009, there were 435 (370 GW) nuclear reactors operating globally (and 52 units listed by the IAEA as under construction). A peak was reached in 2002 when there were 444 nuclear reactors operating.[4]

For the first time in the history of nuclear power no new unit went online in 2008. Moreover, no start-up has been reported for the past two years, since "Cernavoda-2 was connected to the grid on 7 August 2007, after 24 years of construction".[5]

French utility EDF, which is "slated to lead Britain's nuclear renaissance, hopes to sell part of a British energy company to reduce its massive debt".[6] New reactors under construction in Finland and France, which were meant to lead a nuclear renaissance, have been delayed and are running over-budget.[7][8]

China has 16 nuclear units under construction, and at least eight more to start construction later in 2009.[9]

In September 2009, Luc Oursel, chief executive of Areva Nuclear Plants, the core nuclear reactor manufacturing division of Areva, stated: "We are convinced about the nuclear renaissance".[10]

In December 2009, Korea won a contract for four nuclear power plants to be built in the United Arab Emirates, in 2017 to 2020.[11] [12]

See also

References

  1. ^ Mycle Schneider, Steve Thomas, Antony Froggatt, and Doug Koplow (August 2009). The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009 Commissioned by German Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety, pp. 5-7.
  2. ^ A nuclear power renaissance? Maybe not.
  3. ^ Markets will decide nuclear's future, says FERC chairman
  4. ^ a b Nuclear decline set to continue, says report Nuclear Engineering International, 27 August 2009.
  5. ^ Mycle Schneider, Steve Thomas, Antony Froggatt, and Doug Koplow (August 2009). The World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2009 Commissioned by German Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety, p. 5.
  6. ^ EDF starts selling to reduce debt
  7. ^ In Finland, Nuclear Renaissance Runs Into Trouble
  8. ^ Nuclear dawn delayed in Finland
  9. ^ Nuclear Power in China
  10. ^ Areva rushes to hire workers as demand for nuclear reactors explodes
  11. ^ Seoul's U.A.E. Deal Caps Big Sales Push
  12. ^ A new nuclear reactor nucleus

Further reading

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