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In computing, object model has two related but distinct meanings:

  1. The properties of objects in general, in a specific computer programming language, technology, notation or methodology that uses them. For example, the Java object model, the COM object model, or the object model of OMT. Such object models are usually defined using concepts such as class, message, inheritance, polymorphism, and encapsulation. There is an extensive literature on formalized object models as a subset of the formal semantics of programming languages.
  2. A collection of objects or classes through which a program can examine and manipulate some specific parts of its world. In other words, the object-oriented interface to some service or system. Such an interface is said to be the object model of the represented service or system. For example, the Document Object Model (DOM) [1] is a collection of objects that represent a page in a web browser, used by script programs to examine and dynamically change the page. There is a Microsoft Excel object model [2] for controlling Microsoft Excel from another program, and the ASCOM Telescope Driver [3] is an object model for controlling an astronomical telescope.

See also

Literature

  • Weisfeld, Matt (2003). The Object-Oriented Thought Process (2nd Edition). Sams. ISBN 0672326116. 
  • Fowler, Martin (1996). Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0201895420. 
  • K. Fisher, F. Honsell, and J.C. Mitchell (1994). "A Lambda Calculus of Objects and Method Specialization". Nordic Journal of Computing 1: 3–37. 
  • Marini, Joe (2002). Document Object Model: Processing Structured Documents. Osborne/McGray-Hill. ISBN 0072224363. 
  • Lippman, Stanley (1996). Inside the C++ Object Model. Addison-Wesley Professional. ISBN 0201834545. 

External links

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