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Office of Science and Technology Policy
US-OfficeOfScienceAndTechnologyPolicy-Seal.svg
Agency overview
Formed May 11, 1976
Preceding agency Office of Science and Technology
Headquarters 725 17th Street,Washington, D.C.
Employees 45
Agency executive Dr. John Holdren, Director
Parent agency Executive Office of the President
Website
Office of Science and Technology

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is an office in the Executive Office of the President (EOP), established by Congress on May 11, 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs.

The director of this office is colloquially known as the President's Science Advisor. Dr. John Holdren, Director, nominated in December 2008, serves as Science Advisor to President Barack Obama[1]. Dr. John Holdren also co-chairs the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and supports the President's National Science and Technology Council (NSTC)[2][3].

Contents

History

The current OSTP grew out of the Office of Science and Technology which was formed in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy to provide advice and recommendation in response to the growing importance of space exploration and the accelerating Space Race that was taking place with the USSR.

The United States Congress established the OSTP in 1976 with a broad mandate to advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The 1976 Act also authorizes OSTP to lead inter-agency efforts to develop and to implement sound science and technology policies and budgets and to work with the private sector, state and local governments, the science and higher education communities, and other nations toward this end.

Mission

The OSTP's mission is set out in the National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (Pub. L. 94-282). The act calls for the OSTP to serve as a source of scientific and technological analysis and judgement for the President with respect to major policies, plans, and programs of the Federal Government.

It further authorizes the OSTP to:

  • Advise the President and others within the Executive Office of the President on the impacts of science and technology on domestic and international affairs;
  • Lead an inter-agency effort to develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets;
  • Work with the private sector to ensure Federal investments in science and technology contribute to economic prosperity, environmental quality, and national security;
  • Build strong partnerships among Federal, State, and local governments, other countries, and the scientific community;
  • Evaluate the scale, quality, and effectiveness of the Federal effort in science and technology.[4]

OSTP handles a broad range of scientific and technological issues within the Executive Office of the President. It participates in a multitude of White House Policy Coordinating Committees (PCC) that are tasked with developing policies for the Federal Government and are populated by senior officials from cabinet and independent agencies. The OSTP has approximately 45 staff members, most of whom are experienced scientists functioning as assistant directors or policy analysts.

Key Staff

  • Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy: John Holdren
    • Associate Director for Science: Vacant
    • Associate Director for Technology and Chief Technology Officer: Aneesh Chopra[5]
    • Associate Director for National Security & International Affairs: Vacant
    • Associate Director for Energy & Environment: Shere Abbott[6]

Past Science Advisors

President Name Term
Franklin D. Roosevelt Vannevar Bush 1939–1951
Harry S. Truman Oliver E. Buckley 1951–1952
Harry S. Truman Lee A. DuBridge 1952–1953
Dwight Eisenhower Lee A. DuBridge 1953–1956
Dwight Eisenhower Isadore I. Rabi 1956–1957
Dwight Eisenhower James Killian 1957–1959
Dwight Eisenhower George Kistiakowsky 1959–1961
John F. Kennedy Jerome B. Wiesner 1961–1963
Lyndon B. Johnson Jerome B. Wiesner 1963–1964
Lyndon B. Johnson Donald F. Hornig 1964–1969
Richard Nixon Lee A. DuBridge 1969–1970
Richard Nixon Edward E. David Jr. 1970–1973
Gerald Ford H. Guyford Stever 1973–1977
Jimmy Carter Frank Press 1977–1981
Ronald Reagan Benjamin Huberman 1981
Ronald Reagan George A. Keyworth, II 1981–1985
Ronald Reagan John P. McTague 1986
Ronald Reagan Richard G. Johnson 1986
Ronald Reagan William Robert Graham 1986–1989
Ronald Reagan Thomas P. Rona 1989
George H. W. Bush D. Allan Bromley 1989–1993
Bill Clinton John H. Gibbons 1993–1998
Bill Clinton Kerri-Ann Jones 1998
Bill Clinton Neal F. Lane 1998–2001
George W. Bush Rosina Bierbaum 2001
George W. Bush Clifford Gabriel 2001
George W. Bush John H. Marburger III 2001–2009

References

  1. ^ Office of the President-Elect (2008-12-20). "President-elect Obama announces key members of Science and Technology team". Press release. http://change.gov/newsroom/entry/president-elect_obama_announces_key_members_of_science_and_technology_team/. Retrieved 2009-06-05.  
  2. ^ ""About OSTP: John Holdren"". OSTP.gov. Office of Science and Technology Policy. http://www.ostp.gov/cs/about_ostp/. Retrieved 2009-03-09.  
  3. ^ ""About PCAST"". OSTP.gov. Office of Science and Technology Policy. http://www.ostp.gov/cs/pcast. Retrieved 2008-06-21.  
  4. ^ ""About OSTP: Department Organization"". OSTP.gov. Office of Science and Technology Policy. http://www.ostp.gov/cs/about_ostp. Retrieved 2008-06-21.  
  5. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (2009-04-18). "Weekly Address: Efficiency and Innovation". Press release. http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/09/04/18/Weekly-Address-Efficiency-and-Innovation/. Retrieved 2009-06-05.  
  6. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (2009-03-10). "Nominations sent to the Senate". Press release. http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/Presidential-Nominations-Sent-to-the-Senate/. Retrieved 2009-09-16.  

External links

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