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Oliver Herford (1863 - 1935) was a British born American writer, artist and illustrator who has been called "The American Oscar Wilde".[citation needed] As a frequent contributor to The Mentor, Life, and Ladies' Home Journal, he sometimes signed his artwork as "O Herford". In 1906 he wrote and illustrated the "Little Book of Bores". He also wrote short poems like "The Chimpanzee" and "The Hen", as well as writing and illustrating "The Rubaiyat of a Persian Kitten" (1904) and "Excuse It Please" (1930). His sister Beatrice Herford was also a humorist.

Ethel Mumford and Addison Mizner wrote a small book The Cynic's Calendar of Revised Wisdom for 1903 as a Christmas present and added Herford's name as an author as a joke. The printer made up more copies to sell and to everyone's surprise it was an astounding success. When Herford found out about it he wanted 90% of the royalties. He was awarded an equal third[1][2].

Contents

Quotes

  • "A woman's mind is cleaner than a man's: she changes it more often."[citation needed]
  • "If you want to sacrifice the admiration of many men for the criticism of one; go ahead, get married."[citation needed]
  • "Many are called but few get up."[citation needed]
  • "Only the young die good."[citation needed]
  • "Tact: to lie about others as you would have them lie about you."[citation needed]
  • "What is my loftiest ambition? I've always wanted to throw an egg into an electric fan."[citation needed]
  • "The Irish gave the bagpipes to the Scotts as a joke, but the Scotts haven't seen the joke yet."

Books by Oliver Herford

With pictures by the author, published by Charles Scribner's Sons:[3]

  • The Bashful Earthquake
  • A Child's Primer of Natural History; a revision and extension of this title by Margaret Fishback and Hilary Knight appeared as A Child's Book of Natural History (USA: Platt & Monk, 1969)
  • Overheard in a Garden
  • More Animals
  • The Rubaiyat of a Persian Kitten
  • The Fairy Godmother-in-law
  • A Little Book of Bores
  • The Peter Pan Alphabet
  • The Astonishing Tale of a Pen-And-Ink Puppet
  • A Kitten’s Garden of Verses

With John Cecil Clay:

  • Cupid’s Cyclopedia
  • Cupid’s Fair-Weather Booke

With Addison Mizner and Ethel Mumford

  • The Cynic's Calendar of Revised Wisdom for 1903

References

  1. ^ Mizner, Addison. The Many Mizners. Chicago: Sears, 1932. p. 186.
  2. ^ The New York Times. January 10, 1903
  3. ^ Listed at the end of http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/23433, 1911 copyright / PD in US

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Oliver Herford (1863-12-031935-07-05) was an American humorous poet and illustrator.

Unsourced

  • A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame and money, but even... without any hope of doing it well.
  • A woman's mind is cleaner than a man's: She changes it more often.
  • Age, like distance lends a double charm.
  • Cat: a pygmy lion who loves mice, hates dogs, and patronizes human beings.
  • Darling: the popular form of address used in speaking to a member of the opposite sex whose name you cannot at the moment remember.
  • If you want to sacrifice the admiration of many men for the criticism of one; go ahead, get married.
  • Manuscript: something submitted in haste and returned at leisure.
  • Many are called but few get up.
  • Modesty is the gentle art of enhancing your charm by pretending not to be aware of it.
  • My wife has a whim of iron.
  • Only the young die good.
  • Tact is to lie about others as you would have them lie about you.
  • The Irish gave the bagpipes to the Scots as a joke, but the Scots haven't seen the joke yet.
  • There is no time like the pleasant.

External links

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