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Oncostatin M receptor: Wikis

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oncostatin M receptor
Identifiers
Symbols OSMR; MGC150627; OSMRB; MGC75127; MGC150626
External IDs OMIM601743 MGI1330819 HomoloGene2972 GeneCards: OSMR Gene
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 9180 18414
Ensembl ENSG00000145623 ENSMUSG00000022146
UniProt Q99650 O70458
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_003999 NM_011019
RefSeq (protein) NP_003990 NP_035149
Location (UCSC) Chr 5:
38.88 - 38.97 Mb
Chr 15:
6.76 - 6.82 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Oncostatin-M specific receptor subunit beta also known as the oncostatin M receptor is a protein that in humans is encoded by the OSMR gene.[1][2]

OSMR is a member of the type I cytokine receptor family. This protein heterodimerizes with interleukin 6 signal transducer to form the type II oncostatin M receptor and with interleukin 31 receptor A to form the interleukin 31 receptor, and thus transduces oncostatin M and interleukin 31 induced signaling events.[1]

Clinical significance

The oncostatin M receptor is associated with primary cutaneous amyloidosis.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: oncostatin M receptor". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=9180.  
  2. ^ Mosley B, De Imus C, Friend D, Boiani N, Thoma B, Park LS, Cosman D (December 1996). "Dual oncostatin M (OSM) receptors. Cloning and characterization of an alternative signaling subunit conferring OSM-specific receptor activation". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (51): 32635–43. PMID 8999038.  
  3. ^ Arita K, South AP, Hans-Filho G, et al (January 2008). "Oncostatin M receptor-beta mutations underlie familial primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 82 (1): 73–80. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.09.002. PMID 18179886.  

External links

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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