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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ontario
Flag Coat of arms
Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin)
("Loyal she began, loyal she remains")
Capital Toronto
Largest city Toronto
Largest metro Greater Toronto Area
Official languages English, (French de facto)
Demonym Ontarian
Government
Lieutenant Governor David Onley
Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal)
Federal representation in Canadian Parliament
House seats 107
Senate seats 24
Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st)
Area [1] Ranked 4th
Total 1,076,395 km2 (415,598 sq mi)
Land 917,741 km2 (354,342 sq mi)
Water (%) 158,654 km2 (61,257 sq mi) (14.8%)
Population  Ranked 1st
Total (2009) 13,150,000
Density 13.8 /km2 (36 /sq mi)
GDP  Ranked 1st
Total (2008) C$597.2 billion[2]
Per capita C$43,847 (6th)
Abbreviations
Postal ON
ISO 3166-2 CA-ON
Time zone UTC-5 & -6
Postal code prefix K L M N P
Flower White Trillium
Tree Eastern White Pine
Bird Great Northern Loon
Website www.ontario.ca
Rankings include all provinces and territories
Ontario Pronunciation: /ɒnˈtɛəri./ is a province located in east-central Canada,[3][4] the largest by population[5] and second largest, after Quebec, in total area.[1] (Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are larger but are not provinces.)
Ontario is bordered by the Canadian provinces of Manitoba to the west and Quebec to the east, and 5 U.S. states (from west to east): Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania (the latter two across Lake Erie) and New York to the south and east. Most of Ontario's 2,700 km (1,677 mi) long border with the United States runs along water, in the west the Lake of the Woods and eastward of there either on lakes or rivers within the Great Lakes drainage system: Superior, St. Marys River, Huron, St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair (sometimes referred to as the sixth Great Lake), Erie, Ontario and then runs along the St. Lawrence River from near Kingston to near Cornwall. For analytical and geographical purposes Ontario is often broken into two regions, Northern Ontario and Southern Ontario. The great majority of population and arable land in Ontario is located in the south, which contrasts with its relatively small land area in comparison to the north.
The capital of Ontario is Toronto, Canada's most populous city and metropolitan area.[6] .Ottawa, the capital of Canada, is located in Ontario as well.^ Note : Ottawa , Canada's capital, is in southeastern Ontario.
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

^ Ontario is also a political powerhouse, as home of Canada’s capital city Ottawa.

^ Ottawa , the capital city of Canada , is located in Ontario .

The Ontario Government projected a population of 13,150,000 people residing in the province of Ontario as of July 2009.
The province takes its name from Lake Ontario, which is thought to be derived from Ontarí:io, a Huron (Wyandot) word meaning "great lake",[7] or possibly skanadario which means "beautiful water" in Iroquoian.[8] The province contains over 250,000 freshwater lakes.

Contents

Geography

See also List of parks and protected areas of Ontario
Toronto, the capital of Ontario.
Ottawa, the capital of Canada.
The province consists of four main geographical regions:
  • The virtually unpopulated Hudson Bay Lowlands in the extreme north and northeast, mainly swampy and sparsely forested.
  • The temperate and therefore most populous region, the fertile Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence Valley in the south where agriculture and industry are concentrated. Southern Ontario is further sub-divided into four regions; Central Ontario (although not actually the province's geographic centre), Eastern Ontario, Golden Horseshoe and Southwestern Ontario (parts of which were formerly referred to as Western Ontario).
Despite the absence of any mountainous terrain in the province, there are large areas of uplands, particularly within the Canadian Shield which traverses the province from northwest to southeast and also above the Niagara Escarpment which crosses the south. The highest point is Ishpatina Ridge at 693 metres (2,274 ft) above sea level located in Temagami, Northeastern Ontario. In the south, elevations of over 500 m (1,640.42 ft) are surpassed near Collingwood, above the Blue Mountains in the Dundalk Highlands and in hilltops near the Madawaska River in Renfrew County.
The Carolinian forest zone covers most of the southwestern section, its northern extent is part of the Greater Toronto Area at the western end of Lake Ontario. The most well-known geographic feature is Niagara Falls, part of the much more extensive Niagara Escarpment. The Saint Lawrence Seaway allows navigation to and from the Atlantic Ocean as far inland as Thunder Bay in Northwestern Ontario. Northern Ontario occupies roughly 87% of the surface area of the province; conversely Southern Ontario contains 94% of the population.
Point Pelee National Park is a peninsula in southwestern Ontario (near Windsor and Detroit, Michigan) that extends into Lake Erie and is the southernmost extent of Canada's mainland. Pelee Island and Middle Island in Lake Erie extend slightly farther. All are south of 42°N – slightly farther south than the northern border of California.

Climate and environment

Climate

Enjoying summer at Sandbanks Provincial Park on Lake Ontario.
.Ontario has three main climatic regions.^ Surrounded by three Great Lakes, Southern Ontario is a vast region that boasts some of Canada’s finest scenic wonders.
  • Real Estate Southern Ontario Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.cindycody.ca [Source type: News]

^ Three main geological regions make up Ontario: the Great Lakes-St.

Parts of Southwestern Ontario have a moderate humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dfa), similar to that of the inland Mid-Atlantic States and the Great Lakes portion of the Midwestern United States. .The region has warm, humid summers and cold winters.^ The northernmost parts of Ontario - primarily north of the 50th parallel - have a sub~arctic climate with long, very cold winters and short, warm summers and dramatic temperature changes.

^ The clay belt is in latitudes south of Winnipeg , with a good summer climate but cold winters.

^ Winter is characterized by alternating currents of cold arctic air and relatively warm air masses from the Gulf of Mexico.

Annual precipitation ranges from 75–100 cm (30–39 in) and is well distributed throughout the year with a usual summer peak. Most of this region lies in the lee of the Great Lakes making for abundant snow in some areas.
Central and Eastern Ontario have a more severe humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb). This region has warm and sometimes hot summers with colder longer winters, with ample snowfall and roughly equal annual precipitation as the rest of Southern Ontario. Along the eastern shores of Lake Superior and Lake Huron, frequent heavy lake-effect snow squalls increase seasonal snowfall totals upwards of 3 m (120 in) in some places.
The northernmost parts of Ontario — primarily north of 50°N have a subarctic climate (Köppen Dfc) with long, severely cold winters and short, cool to warm summers with dramatic temperature changes possible in all seasons. With no major mountain ranges blocking sinking Arctic air masses, temperatures of −40 °C (−40.0 °F) are not uncommon, snowfall remains on the ground for sometimes over half the year. Precipitation is generally less than 70 cm (28 in).
Severe and non-severe thunderstorms peak in summer. London, situated in Southern (Southwestern) Ontario, has the most lightning strikes per year in Canada, averaging 34 days of thunderstorm activity per year. In a typical year, Ontario averages 15 confirmed tornado touchdowns, though they are rarely destructive (the majority between F0 to F2 on the Fujita scale). Tropical depression remnants occasionally bring heavy rains and winds in the south, but are rarely deadly. A notable exception was Hurricane Hazel which struck Toronto, in October 1954. Winter storms can disrupt power supply and transportation, severe ice storms can also occur, especially in the east.

Environment

The Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009 (GEGEA), takes a two-pronged approach to creating a renewable-energy economy.

History

Territorial evolution

When Canada was formed in 1867 its provinces were a relatively narrow strip in the southeast, with vast territories in the interior. It grew by adding British Columbia in 1871, P.E.I. in 1873, the British Arctic Islands in 1880, and Newfoundland in 1949; meanwhile, its provinces grew both in size and number at the expense of its territories.
Evolution of the borders of Ontario
Land was not legally subdivided into administrative units until a treaty had been concluded with the native peoples ceding the land. In 1788, while part of the Province of Quebec (1763–1791), southern Ontario was divided into four districts: Hesse, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, and Nassau.
In 1792, the four districts were renamed: Hesse became the Western District, Lunenburg became the Eastern District, Mecklenburg became the Midland District, and Nassau became the Home District. Counties were created within the districts.
By 1798, there were eight districts: Eastern, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, and Western.
By 1826, there were eleven districts: Bathurst, Eastern, Gore, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, and Western.
By 1838, there were twenty districts: Bathurst, Brock, Colbourne, Dalhousie, Eastern, Gore, Home, Huron, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, Prince Edward, Simcoe, Talbot, Victoria, Wellington, and Western.
In 1849, the districts of southern Ontario were abolished by the Province of Canada, and county governments took over certain municipal responsibilities. The Province of Canada also began creating districts in sparsely populated Northern Ontario with the establishment of Algoma District and Nipissing District in 1858.
The borders of Ontario were provisionally expanded north and west. When the Province of Canada was formed, its borders were not entirely clear, and Ontario claimed to eventually reach all the way to the Rocky Mountains and Arctic Ocean. With Canada's acquisition of Rupert's Land, Ontario was interested in clearly defining its borders, especially since some of the new areas it was interested in were rapidly growing. After the federal government asked Ontario to pay for construction in the new disputed area, the province asked for an elaboration on its limits, and its boundary was moved north to the 51st parallel north.[9]
The northern and western boundaries of Ontario were in dispute after Confederation. Ontario's right to Northwestern Ontario was determined by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in 1884 and confirmed by the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889 of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. .By 1899, there were seven northern districts: Algoma, Manitoulin, Muskoka, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, and Thunder Bay.^ Northern Ontario, as usually defined, lies north of a line drawn from the confluence of the Mattawa and Ottawa rivers (at the Quebec border, east of Lake Nipissing ) southwest to the mouth of the French River, on Georgian Bay .
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Thunder Bay has the largest open pit gemstone mine in North America; all types of amethyst are found there.

^ I live in Parry Sound, Ontario right on Georgian Bay in a small inlet directly east of Sandy Island.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

.Four more northern districts were created between 1907 and 1912: Cochrane, Kenora, Sudbury and Timiskaming.^ Between 1891 and 1911, northern Ontario's population went from four per cent to almost 11 per cent of Ontario's population as the north's population grew 220 per cent while that of the south only grew by 11 per cent.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

[10]

European contact

Before the arrival of the Europeans, the region was inhabited both by Algonquian (Ojibwa, Cree and Algonquin) in the northern/western portions and Iroquois and Wyandot (Huron) tribes more in the south/east.[11] During the 1600s, the Algonquians and Hurons fought a bitter war against the Iroquois.[12] The French explorer Étienne Brûlé explored part of the area in 1610-12.[13] The English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into Hudson Bay in 1611 and claimed the area for England, but Samuel de Champlain reached Lake Huron in 1615, and French missionaries began to establish posts along the Great Lakes. French settlement was hampered by their hostilities with the Iroquois, who allied themselves with the British.[14] From 1634 to 1640, Hurons were devastated by European infectious diseases, such as measles and smallpox, to which they had no immunity.[15]
The British established trading posts on Hudson Bay in the late 17th century and began a struggle for domination of Ontario. The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War by awarding nearly all of France's North American possessions (New France) to Britain.[16] The region was annexed to Quebec in 1774.[17] From 1783 to 1796, the Kingdom of Great Britain granted United Empire Loyalists leaving the United States following the American Revolution 200 acres (81 ha) of land and other items with which to rebuild their lives.[14] This measure substantially increased the population of Canada west of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence during this period, a fact recognized by the Constitutional Act of 1791, which split Quebec into the Canadas: Upper Canada southwest of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence, and Lower Canada east of it. John Graves Simcoe was appointed Upper Canada's first Lieutenant-Governor in 1793.[18]

Upper Canada

American troops in the War of 1812 invaded Upper Canada across the Niagara River and the Detroit River, but were defeated and pushed back by British regulars, Canadian fencibles and militias, and First Nations warriors. The Americans gained control of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, however. During the Battle of York they occupied the Town of York (later named Toronto) in 1813. The Americans looted the town and burned the Parliament Buildings but were soon forced to leave.
After the War of 1812, relative stability allowed for increasing numbers of immigrants to arrive from Europe rather than from the United States. As was the case in the previous decades, this deliberate immigration shift was encouraged by the colonial leaders. Despite affordable and often free land, many arriving newcomers, mostly from Britain and Ireland found frontier life with the harsh climate difficult, and some of those with the means eventually returned home or went south. However, population growth far exceeded emigration in the decades that followed. It was a mostly agrarian-based society, but canal projects and a new network of plank roads spurred greater trade within the colony and with the United States, thereby improving previously damaged relations over time.
Lower Ontario in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, approximate province area highlighted.
Meanwhile, Ontario's numerous waterways aided travel and transportation into the interior and supplied water power for development. .As the population increased, so did the industries and transportation networks, which in turn led to further development.^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.By the end of the century, Ontario vied with Quebec as the nation's leader in terms of growth in population, industry, arts and communications.^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Municipal spending on the arts was C $58 per person, and federal spending on the arts in Ontario was C $98 per person, slightly higher than the national average of C $96.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

[19]
Many in the colony however, began to chafe against the aristocratic Family Compact who governed while benefiting economically from the region's resources, and who did not allow elected bodies the power to effect change (much as the Château Clique ruled Lower Canada). This resentment spurred republican ideals and sowed the seeds for early Canadian nationalism. Accordingly, rebellion in favour of responsible government rose in both regions; Louis-Joseph Papineau led the Lower Canada Rebellion and William Lyon Mackenzie led the Upper Canada Rebellion.

Canada West

Although both rebellions were put down in short order, the British government sent Lord Durham to investigate the causes of the unrest. He recommended that self-government be granted and that Lower and Upper Canada be re-joined in an attempt to assimilate the French Canadians. Accordingly, the two colonies were merged into the Province of Canada by the Act of Union 1840, with the capital at Kingston, and Upper Canada becoming known as Canada West. Parliamentary self-government was granted in 1848. There were heavy waves of immigration in the 1840s, and the population of Canada West more than doubled by 1851 over the previous decade. As a result, for the first time the English-speaking population of Canada West surpassed the French-speaking population of Canada East, tilting the representative balance of power.
An economic boom in the 1850s coincided with railway expansion across the province, further increasing the economic strength of Central Canada. With the repeal of the Corn Laws and a reciprocity agreement in place with United States, various industries such as timber, mining, farming and alcohol distilling benefited tremendously.
A political stalemate between the French- and English-speaking legislators, as well as fear of aggression from the United States during and immediately after the American Civil War, led the political elite to hold a series of conferences in the 1860s to effect a broader federal union of all British North American colonies. The British North America Act took effect on July 1, 1867, establishing the Dominion of Canada, initially with four provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. .The Province of Canada was divided into Ontario and Quebec so that each linguistic group would have its own province.^ International Nannies and Homecare Ltd Ontario, Canada Part of the AllWorldJobs.com Group © 2006-2009 All Rights Reserved All World Jobs Ltd.
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ The Laudi Group Toronto, Ontario, Canada The Laudi Group is a hybrid search firm dedicated to the ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ Derhak Ireland & Partners Etobicoke, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Randstad Montréal, Quebec, Canada Randstad is a provider of professional employment services ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

Both Quebec and Ontario were required by section 93 of the BNA Act to safeguard existing educational rights and privileges of Protestant and the Catholic minority. Thus, separate Catholic schools and school boards were permitted in Ontario. .However, neither province had a constitutional requirement to protect its French- or English-speaking minority.^ English is the only official language, but Ontario's French speakers play an essential part in the province's cultural life and are the largest language minority The provincial government provides services in French in the regions where the French-speaking population is sufficiently high.

.Toronto was formally established as Ontario's provincial capital.^ Toronto, Ontario's capital and Canada's largest city, had a population of 4.37 million in 2001.

^ Toronto, the provincial capital, has grown from S9,000 in 1871 to about 300,000, partly through the absorption of neighbouring towns and villages.

^ Toronto, Ontario, Canada Established in 1986, AKI is a consulting and training ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

In 1868 the coat of arms and motto of Ontario are created. Curiously, the motto ("Ut incepit fidelis sic permanet") was added to Ontario´s coat of arms by Sir Henry William Stisted, The first Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario; who was a great friend of the Spanish General José of Bascarán and Federic, the 27th Lord of Olvera. In one of his visits to him, Sir Henry observed the mentioned motto in the coat of arms that was hung on the wall of the lounge of the house of the General Bascarán, and Sir Henry requested authorization from his friend to include in the coat of arms of Ontario the motto of the Spanish city because he thought that it was representing perfectly the feelings of the Ontarians.

Province of Ontario

.Once constituted as a province, Ontario proceeded to assert its economic and legislative power.^ By 15 August, Ontario Hydro had reestablished 75 percent of the power in the province, although rolling blackouts were still occurring.

In 1872, the lawyer Oliver Mowat became Premier of Ontario and remained as premier until 1896. He fought for provincial rights, weakening the power of the federal government in provincial matters, usually through well-argued appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. His battles with the federal government greatly decentralized Canada, giving the provinces far more power than John A. Macdonald had intended. .He consolidated and expanded Ontario's educational and provincial institutions, created districts in Northern Ontario, and fought to ensure that those parts of Northwestern Ontario not historically part of Upper Canada (the vast areas north and west of the Lake Superior-Hudson Bay watershed, known as the District of Keewatin) would become part of Ontario, a victory embodied in the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889.^ Becoming part of a global community of over 220,000 members interested in global issues and creating positive change.

^ My TIG For Educators For Organizations Donate About Us Home Explore the World Canada Ontario Ontario, Canada .

.He also presided over the emergence of the province into the economic powerhouse of Canada.^ When the Dominion of Canada was created in 1867, the region was split into the separate provinces of Ontario and Québec.

Mowat was the creator of what is often called Empire Ontario.
Beginning with Sir John A. Macdonald's National Policy (1879) and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (1875–1885) through Northern Ontario and the Canadian Prairies to British Columbia, Ontario manufacturing and industry flourished. .However, population increase slowed after a large recession hit the province in 1893, thus slowing growth drastically but only for a few short years.^ This emigration accounts in large measure for the slow increase of the population, though there has also been a slight decrease in the birth-rate.

^ The finances of the province have been well administered, and only in recent years has a debt been incurred, chiefly owing to the construction of a provincial railway to aid in the development of the northern districts.

^ Ontario is thus pre-eminently an agricultural province, though the growth of manufactures has increased the importance of the towns and cities, and many of the farmers are seeking new homes in the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan .

Many newly arrived immigrants and others moved west along the railroad to the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia, sparsely settling Northern Ontario.
Mineral exploitation accelerated in the late 19th century, leading to the rise of important mining centres in the northeast like Sudbury, Cobalt and Timmins. The province harnessed its water power to generate hydro-electric power and created the state-controlled Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, later Ontario Hydro. The availability of cheap electric power further facilitated the development of industry. The Ford Motor Company of Canada was established in 1904. General Motors Canada was formed in 1918. The motor vehicle industry would go on to become the most lucrative industry for the Ontario economy during the 20th century.
In July 1912, the Conservative government of Sir James Whitney issued Regulation 17 which severely limited the availability of French-language schooling to the province's French-speaking minority. French Canadians reacted with outrage, journalist Henri Bourassa denouncing the "Prussians of Ontario". It was eventually repealed in 1927.
Influenced by events in the United States, the government of Sir William Hearst introduced prohibition of alcoholic drinks in 1916 with the passing of the Ontario Temperance Act. However, residents could distil and retain their own personal supply, and liquor producers could continue distillation and export for sale, which allowed this already sizable industry to strengthen further. Ontario became a hotbed for the illegal smuggling of liquor and the biggest supplier into the United States, which was under complete prohibition. Prohibition in Ontario came to an end in 1927 with the establishment of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario under the government of Howard Ferguson. .The sale and consumption of liquor, wine, and beer are still controlled by some of the most extreme laws in North America to ensure that strict community standards and revenue generation from the alcohol retail monopoly are upheld.^ The program is also the most ambitious program of its kind in North America and the largest goal of any jurisdiction, anywhere.
  • Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop – Daily Commercial News 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dcnonl.com [Source type: News]

^ It is the second most important vehicle producing region in North America after Michigan.

In April 2007, Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament Kim Craitor suggested that local brewers should be able to sell their beer in local corner stores; however, the motion was quickly rejected by Premier Dalton McGuinty.
.The post-World War II period was one of exceptional prosperity and growth.^ World War II (1939–1945) brought both the United States and Canada out of the depths of the Depression.

Ontario, and the Greater Toronto Area in particular, have been the recipients of most immigration to Canada, largely immigrants from war-torn Europe in the 1950s and 1960s and after changes in federal immigration law, a massive influx of non-Europeans since the 1970s. From a largely ethnically British province, Ontario has rapidly become very culturally diverse.
The nationalist movement in Quebec, particularly after the election of the Parti Québécois in 1976, contributed to driving many businesses and English-speaking people out of Quebec to Ontario, and as a result Toronto surpassed Montreal as the largest city and economic centre of Canada. Depressed economic conditions in the Maritime Provinces have also resulted in de-population of those provinces in the 20th century, with heavy migration into Ontario.
Ontario has no official language, but English is considered the de facto language. Numerous French language services are available under the French Language Services Act of 1990 in designated areas where sizable francophone populations exist.

Demographics

Population since 1851

Year Population Five-year
% change
Ten-year
% change
Rank among
provinces
1851 952,004 n/a 208.8 1
1861 1,396,091 n/a 46.6 1
1871 1,620,851 n/a 16.1 1
1881 1,926,922 n/a 18.9 1
1891 2,114,321 n/a 9.7 1
1901 2,182,947 n/a 3.2 1
1911 2,527,292 n/a 15.8 1
1921 2,933,662 n/a 16.1 1
1931 3,431,683 n/a 17.0 1
1941 3,787,655 n/a 10.3 1
1951 4,597,542 n/a 21.4 1
1956 5,404,933 17.6 n/a 1
1961 6,236,092 15.4 35.6 1
1966 6,960,870 11.6 28.8 1
1971 7,703,105 10.7 23.5 1
1976 8,264,465 7.3 18.7 1
1981 8,625,107 4.4 12.0 1
1986 9,101,695 5.5 10.1 1
1991 10,084,885 10.8 16.9 1
1996 10,753,573 6.6 18.1 1
2001 11,410,046 6.1 13.1 1
2006* 12,160,282 6.6 11.6 1
*2006 Census[20][21][22][23]

Ethnic groups

Ethnic Responses %
Total population 12,028,895 100
English 2,971,360 24.7
Canadian 2,768,870 23.0
Scottish 2,101,100 17.5
Irish 1,988,940 16.5
French 1,351,600 11.2
German 1,144,560 9.5
Italian 867,980 7.2
Chinese 644,465 5.4
East Indian 573,250 4.8
Dutch (Netherlands) 490,995 4.1
Polish 465,560 3.9
Ukrainian 336,355 2.8
North American Indian 317,890 2.6
Portuguese 282,870 2.4
Filipino 215,750 1.8
British, not included
elsewhere
205,755 1.7
Jamaican 197,540 1.6
Welsh 182,825 1.5
Jewish 177,255 1.5
Russian 167,365 1.4
Hungarian (Magyar) 151,750 1.3
Spanish 149,160 1.2
Greek 132,440 1.1
American (USA) 113,050 0.9
Pakistani 91,160 0.8
Métis 87,090 0.7
Sri Lankan 85,935 0.7
Vietnamese 83,330 0.7
Romanian 80,710 0.7
African, not included elsewhere 75,500 0.6
Finnish 72,990 0.6
Korean 72,065 0.6
Croatian 71,380 0.6
.The percentages add to more than 100% because of dual responses (e.g.^ More than 100 professional companies perform plays, cabaret, opera, and dance in Toronto.

"French-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "French" and the category "Canadian"). Groups with greater than 200,000 responses are included.
The majority of Ontarians are of British or other European descent. Slightly less than five percent of the population of Ontario is Franco-Ontarian, that is those whose native tongue is French, although those with French ancestry account for 11% of the population.
In relation to natural increase or inter-provincial migration, immigration is a huge population growth force in Ontario, as it has been over the last two centuries. More recent sources of immigrants with already large or growing communities in Ontario include Caribbeans (Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Guyanese, and Bajan), South Asians (e.g. Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and Sri Lankans), East Asians (mostly Chinese and Filipinos), Latin Americans (such as Colombians, Mexicans, Hondurans, Argentinans, and Ecuadorians), Eastern Europeans such as Russians and Bosnians, and groups from Somalia, Iran, and West Africa. .Most populations have settled in the Greater Toronto area.^ Transmission to others subsequently led to an outbreak among 257 people in the greater Toronto area.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

^ Greater Toronto Area (GTA) Locals / Branches GTA Committees .
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

A smaller number have settled in other cities such as London, Kitchener, Hamilton, Windsor, Barrie, and Ottawa.

Religion

The largest denominations by number of adherents according to the 2001 census were the Roman Catholic Church with 3,866,350 (34 %); the United Church of Canada with 1,334,570 (12 %); and the Anglican Church of Canada with 985,110 (9 %).[25]
The major religious groups in Ontario, as of 2001, are:[26]
Religion in Ontario in 2001.[27]
Religion People %
Total 11,285,545 100
Protestant 3,935,745 34.9
Catholic 3,911,760 34.7
No Religion 1,841,290 16.3
Muslim 352,530 3.1
Other Christians 301,935 2.7
Christian Orthodox 264,055 2.3
Hindu 217,555 1.9
Jewish 190,795 1.7
Buddhist 128,320 1.1
Sikh 104,785 0.9
Eastern Religions 17,780 0.2
Other Religions 18,985 0.2

Visible minorities and aboriginal peoples

Ontario is the second most diverse province in terms of visible minorities after British Columbia, with 22.8 per cent of the population consisting of visible minorities.[28] The Greater Toronto Area, Ottawa, Windsor, Hamilton and Waterloo Region are quite diverse cities.
Aboriginal peoples make up two per cent of the population, with two-thirds of that consisting of North American Indians and the other third consisting of Métis. The number of Aboriginal people has been increasing at rates greater than the general population of Ontario.[29]

Economy

The CN Tower in Toronto has the 2nd highest public observation level on Earth.
Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Home of the federal government.
Ontario is Canada's leading manufacturing province accounting for 52% of the total national manufacturing shipments in 2004.[30] Ontario's largest trading partner is the American state of Michigan.
.Ontario's rivers, including its share of the Niagara River, make it rich in hydroelectric energy.^ Niagara river into Lake Ontario, which is only 247 ft.

[31] Since the privatization of Ontario Hydro which began in 1999, Ontario Power Generation runs 85% of electricity generated in the province, of which 41% is nuclear, 30% is hydroelectric and 29% is fossil fuel derived. Much of the newer power generation coming online in the last few years is natural gas or combined cycle natural gas plants. OPG is not however responsible for the transmission of power, which is under the control of Hydro One. Despite its diverse range of power options, problems related to increasing consumption, lack of energy efficiency and aging nuclear reactors, Ontario has been forced in recent years to purchase power from its neighbours Quebec and Michigan to supplement its power needs during peak consumption periods.
An abundance of natural resources, excellent transportation links to the American heartland and the inland Great Lakes making ocean access possible via container ships, have all contributed to making manufacturing the principal industry, found mainly in the Golden Horseshoe region, which is the largest industrialized area in Canada, the southern end of the region being part of the North American Rust Belt. Important products include motor vehicles, iron, steel, food, electrical appliances, machinery, chemicals, and paper. Ontario surpassed Michigan in car production, assembling 2.696 million vehicles in 2004. Ontario has Chrysler plants in Windsor and Bramalea, two GM plants in Oshawa and one in Ingersol, a Honda assembly plant in Alliston, Ford plants in Oakville and St. Thomas and Toyota assembly plants in Cambridge and Woodstock.
However, as a result of steeply declining sales, in 2005, General Motors announced massive layoffs at production facilities across North America including two large GM plants in Oshawa and a drive train facility in St. Catharines resulting in 8,000 job losses in Ontario alone. In 2006, Ford Motor Company announced between 25,000 and 30,000 layoffs phased until 2012; Ontario was spared the worst, but job losses were announced for the St. Thomas facility and the Windsor Casting plant. However, these losses will be offset by Ford's recent announcement of a hybrid vehicle facility slated to begin production in 2007 at its Oakville plant and GM's re-introduction of the Camaro which will be produced in Oshawa. On December 4, 2008 Toyota announced the grand opening of the RAV4 plant in Woodstock,[32] and Honda also has plans to add an engine plant at its facility in Alliston. Despite these new plants coming online, Ontario has been hurt by layoffs created cause by the global recession, its unemployment rate is steadied at 9.2% (as of Jan. 2010) vs. roughly 6% in 2007.
Toronto, the capital of Ontario, is the centre of Canada's financial services and banking industry. Neighbouring cities in the Greater Toronto Area like Brampton, Mississauga and Vaughan are large product distribution and IT centres, in addition to having various manufacturing industries. The information technology sector is also important, particularly in the Silicon Valley North section of Ottawa , as well as the Waterloo Region. Government is the single largest employer in the National Capital Region employing hundreds of thousands. Hamilton is the largest steel manufacturing city in Canada, and Sarnia is the centre for petrochemical production. Construction employs at least 7% of the work force, this sector has slowed down somewhat after a ten year plus boom.
Mining and the forest products industry, notably pulp and paper, are vital to the economy of Northern Ontario. More than any other region, tourism contributes heavily to the economy of Central Ontario, peaking during the summer months owing to the abundance of fresh water recreation and wilderness found there in reasonable proximity to the major urban centres. At other times of the year, hunting, skiing and snowmobiling are popular. This region has some of the most vibrant fall colour displays anywhere on the continent, and tours directed at overseas visitors are organized to see them. Tourism also plays a key role in border cities with large casinos, among them Windsor, Cornwall, Sarnia and Niagara Falls, which attract many U.S. visitors.[33]

Agriculture

Once the dominant industry, agriculture occupies a small percentage of the population but still a large part of Southern Ontario's land area. The number of farms has decreased from 68,633 in 1991 to 59,728 in 2001, but farms have increased in average size, and many are becoming more mechanized. Cattle, small grains and dairy were the common types of farms in the 2001 census. The fruit, grape and vegetable growing industry is located primarily on the Niagara Peninsula and along Lake Erie, where tobacco farms are also situated. The Corn Belt covers much of the southwestern area of the province extending as far north as close to Goderich. Apple orchards are a common sight along the southern shore of Georgian Bay near Collingwood and along the northern shore of Lake Ontario near Cobourg. Tobacco production, centred in Norfolk County has decreased leading to an increase in some other new crop alternatives gaining popularity, such as hazelnuts and ginseng. The Ontario origins of Massey Ferguson, once one of the largest farm implement manufacturers in the world, indicate the importance agriculture once had to the Canadian economy.
Southern Ontario's limited supply of agricultural land is going out of production at an increasing rate. Urban sprawl and farmland severances contribute to the loss of thousands of acres of productive agricultural land in Ontario each year. Over 2,000 farms and 150,000 acres (61,000 ha) of farmland in the GTA alone were lost to production in the two decades between 1976 and 1996. This loss represented approximately 18% of Ontario's Class 1 farmland being converted to urban purposes. In addition, increasing rural severances provide ever-greater interference with agricultural production.
The 500,000, or so, acres (200,000 ha) comprising the black peat soil Holland Marsh, located just south of Lake Simcoe and near the town of Bradford West Gwillimbury (35 mi (56 km) north of Toronto) continues to be Canada's premier vegetable production center.

Energy

Niagara Falls is a large supplier of hydroelectric energy for the province.
The CANDU Bruce Nuclear Generating Station is the second largest nuclear power plant in the world.
The Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009 (GEA), takes a two-pronged approach to creating a renewable-energy economy. The first is to bring more renewable energy sources to the province and the second is the creation of more energy efficiency measures to help conserve energy. The bill would also appoint a Renewable Energy Facilitator to provide "one-window" assistance and support to project developers in order to facilitate project approvals. The approvals process for transmission projects would also be streamlined and for the first time in Ontario, the bill would enact standards for renewable energy projects. Homeowners would have access to incentives to develop small-scale renewables such as low- or no-interest loans to finance the capital cost of renewable energy generating facilities like solar panels.[34]
Ontario is home to Niagara Falls, which supplies a large amount of clean, hydroelectric energy for the province. The Bruce Nuclear Generating Station, the second largest nuclear power plant in the world, is also in Ontario and uses 8 CANDU reactors to power the province with clean, reliable energy.

Transportation

Historically, the province has used two major east-west routes, both starting from Montreal in the neighbouring province of Quebec. The northerly route, which was pioneered by early French-speaking fur traders, travels northwest from Montreal along the Ottawa River, then continues westward towards Manitoba. Major cities on or near the route include Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, and Thunder Bay. The much more heavily travelled southerly route, which was driven by growth in predominantly English-speaking settlements originated by the United Empire Loyalists and later other European immigrants, travels southwest from Montreal along the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, and Lake Erie before entering the United States in Michigan. Major cities on or near the route include Kingston, Oshawa, Toronto, Mississauga, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Sarnia, and Windsor. This route was also heavily used by immigrants to the Midwestern US particularly in the late 19th century. .Most of Ontario's major transportation infrastructure is oriented east-west and roughly follows one of these two original routes.^ Automobiles are Ontario's major manufacturing industry and are its most important export.

^ As Canada's most populous province, Ontario is both the primary origin and primary destination for internal migration.

^ We were so excited watching both of them when suddenly another one soared from above and came down to these two.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

Roads

Highway 401, running 817.9 km (508.2 mi) east/northeast from Windsor to the Quebec border is one of the busiest highways in the world.[35][36]
400-Series Highways make up the primary vehicular network in the south of province, and they connect to numerous border crossings with the U.S., the busiest being the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel and Ambassador Bridge (via Highway 401) and the Blue Water Bridge (via Highway 402). The primary highway along the southern route is Highway 401/Highway of Heroes, the busiest highway in North America[35][36] and the backbone of Ontario's road network, tourism, and economy,[35][36] while the primary highways across the north are Highway 417/Highway 17 and Highway 11, both part of the Trans-Canada Highway. Highway 400/Highway 69 connects Toronto to Northern Ontario. Other provincial highways and regional roads inter-connect the remainder of the province.

Waterways

The Saint Lawrence Seaway, which extends across most of the southern portion of the province and connects to the Atlantic Ocean, is the primary water transportation route for cargo, particularly iron ore and grain. In the past, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River were also a major passenger transportation route, but over the past half century passenger travel has been reduced to ferry services and sightseeing cruises.

Railways

The O-Train, Ottawa's light rail train system (LRT).
Via Rail operates the inter-regional passenger train service on the Quebec City – Windsor Corridor, along with "The Canadian", a transcontinental rail service from Toronto to Vancouver, and "The Lake Superior", a regional rail service from Sudbury to White River. Additionally, Amtrak rail connects Ontario with key New York cities including Buffalo, Albany, and New York City. Ontario Northland provides rail service to destinations as far north as Moosonee near James Bay, connecting them with the south.
Freight rail is dominated by the founding cross-country Canadian National Railway and CP Rail companies, which during the 1990s sold many short rail lines from their vast network to private companies operating mostly in the south.
Regional commuter rail is limited to the provincially owned GO Transit, which serves a train/bus network spanning the Golden Horseshoe region, with its hub in Toronto.
The Toronto Transit Commission operates the province's only subway and streetcar system, one of the busiest in North America. The O-Train Light rail line operates in Ottawa with expansion of the line and proposals for additional lines.

Air travel

Toronto Pearson International Airport is the nation's busiest and the world's 29th busiest, handling over 30 million passengers per year. Other important airports include Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport and Hamilton's John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport, which is an important courier and freight aviation centre. Toronto/Pearson and Ottawa/Macdonald-Cartier form two of the three points in Canada's busiest set of air routes (the third point is Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport).
Most Ontario cities have regional airports, many of which have scheduled commuter flights from Air Canada Jazz or smaller airlines and charter companies — flights from the larger cities such as Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, North Bay, Timmins, Windsor, London, and Kingston feed directly into Toronto Pearson. Bearskin Airlines also runs flights along the northerly east-west route, connecting Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, and Thunder Bay directly without requiring connections at Toronto Pearson.
Isolated towns and settlements in the northern areas of the province rely partly or entirely on air service for travel, goods, and even ambulance services (MEDIVAC), since much of the far northern area of the province cannot be reached by road or rail.

Government

The wordmark of the Government of Ontario, featuring a stylized version of the provincial flower, the trillium. This wordmark was introduced in late 2007.
The previous wordmark of the Government of Ontario, which was in use from the late-1960s until 2007 (apart from the lettering used here).
The British North America Act 1867 section 69 stipulated "There shall be a Legislature for Ontario consisting of the Lieutenant Governor and of One House, styled the Legislative Assembly of Ontario." The assembly has 107 seats representing ridings elected in a first-past-the-post system across the province. The legislative buildings at Queen's Park in Toronto are the seat of government. Following the Westminster system, the leader of the party holding the most seats in the assembly is known as the "Premier and President of the Council" (Executive Council Act R.S.O. 1990). The Premier chooses the cabinet or Executive Council whose members are deemed "ministers of the Crown." Although the Legislative Assembly Act (R.S.O. 1990) refers to members of the assembly, the legislators are now commonly called MPPs (Members of the Provincial Parliament) in English and députés de l'Assemblée législative in French, but they have also been called MLAs (Members of the Legislative Assembly), and both are acceptable. The title of Prime Minister of Ontario, correct in French (le Premier ministre), is permissible in English but now generally avoided in favour of the title "Premier" to avoid confusion with the Prime Minister of Canada.

Politics

.Ontario has traditionally operated under a three-party system.^ By 1995, the Progressive Conservative Party had returned to power in Ontario under the leadership of Mike Harris.

In the last few decades the liberal Ontario Liberal Party, conservative Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario, and social-democratic Ontario New Democratic Party have all ruled the province at different times.
Ontario is currently under a Liberal government headed by Premier Dalton McGuinty. The present government, first elected in 2003, was re-elected on October 10, 2007.
Federally, Ontario is known as being the province that offers strong support for the Liberal Party of Canada. Currently, half of the party's 76 seats in the Canadian House of Commons represent Ontario ridings, although, in the 2008 federal election, for the first time since the Mulroney government, the Conservatives won a plurality of the seats and the vote. As the province has the most seats of any province in Canada, earning support from Ontario voters is considered a crucial matter for any party hoping to win a Canadian federal election.

Urban areas

Census Metropolitan Areas

Statistics Canada's measure of a "metro area", the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), roughly bundles together population figures from the core municipality with those from "commuter" municipalities.[37]
CMA (largest other included municipalities in brackets) 2006 2001
Toronto CMA (Region of Peel, Region of York, Pickering) 5,113,149 4,682,897
Ottawa CMA (Gatineau, Clarence-Rockland)* 1,130,761* 1,067,800*
Hamilton CMA (Burlington, Grimsby) 692,911 662,401
London CMA (St. Thomas, Strathroy-Caradoc) 457,720 435,600
Kitchener CMA (Cambridge, Waterloo) 451,235 414,284
St. Catharines CMA (Niagara Falls, Welland) 390,317 377,009
Oshawa CMA (Whitby, Clarington) 330,594 296,298
Windsor CMA (Lakeshore, LaSalle) 323,342 307,877
Barrie CMA (Innisfil, Springwater) 177,061 148,480
Sudbury CMA (Whitefish Lake, Wanapitei Reserve) 158,258 155,601
Kingston CMA 152,358 146,838
*Parts of Quebec (including Gatineau) are included in the Ottawa CMA. The entire population of the Ottawa CMA, in both provinces, is shown. Clarence-Rockland and Russell Township are not the second and third largest municipalities in the entire CMA, they are the largest municipalities in the Ontario section of the CMA.

Municipalities

Ten largest municipalities by population[20]
Municipality 2006 2001 1996
Toronto (Provincial capital) &0000000002503281.0000002,503,281 &0000000002481494.0000002,481,494 &0000000002385421.0000002,385,421
Ottawa (National capital) &0000000000812129.000000812,129 &0000000000774072.000000774,072 &0000000000721136.000000721,136
Mississauga &0000000000668549.000000668,549 &0000000000612925.000000612,925 &0000000000544382.000000544,382
Hamilton &0000000000504559.000000504,559 &0000000000490268.000000490,268 &0000000000467799.000000467,799
Brampton &0000000000433806.000000433,806 &0000000000325428.000000325,428 &0000000000268251.000000268,251
London &0000000000352395.000000352,395 &0000000000336539.000000336,539 &0000000000325669.000000325,669
Markham &0000000000261573.000000261,573 &0000000000208615.000000208,615 &0000000000173383.000000173,383
Vaughan &0000000000238866.000000238,866 &0000000000182022.000000182,022 &0000000000132549.000000132,549
Windsor &0000000000216473.000000216,473 &0000000000209218.000000209,218 &0000000000197694.000000197,694
Kitchener &0000000000204668.000000204,668 &0000000000190399.000000190,399 &0000000000178420.000000178,420

Songs and slogans

During the John Robarts government of the 1960s, the slogan "Is There Any Other Place You'd Rather Be?" was in use to promote tourism. During a blizzard early in 1971, highway travellers stranded at a Highway 401 service centre, with Premier Robarts (in his last months of office), asked him the slogan in an ironic twist.
In 1967, in conjunction with the celebration of Canada's centennial, the song "A Place to Stand" was introduced at the inauguration of Ontario's pavilion at the Expo 67 World's Fair, and became the background for the province's advertising for decades.
In 1973 the first slogan to appear on licence plates in Ontario was "Keep It Beautiful". This was replaced by "Yours to Discover" in 1982,[38] apparently inspired by a tourism slogan, "Discover Ontario," dating back to 1927.[39] (From 1988 to 1990,[40] "Ontario Incredible"[41] gave "Yours to Discover" a brief respite.)
In 2007, a new song replaced "A Place to Stand" after four decades. "There's No Place Like This" (Un Endroit Sans Pareil) is featured in current television advertising, performed by Ontario artists including Molly Johnson, Brian Byrne, Keshia Chanté (from Ottawa),[42] as well as Tomi Swick and Arkells (both from Hamilton).

Famous Ontarians

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Canada's provinces and territories total area, land area and water area.". Statistics Canada. http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/phys01.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  2. ^ "Ontario Budget 2007: Chapter II". Fin.gov.on.ca. http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/english/budget/ontariobudgets/2007/chpt2.html#secg1. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  3. ^ "Ontario." Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. 2003. (ISBN 0-87779-809-5) New York: Merriam-Webster, Inc."
  4. ^ Ontario is located in the eastern part of Canada, but is also historically and politically considered to be part of Central Canada (with Quebec).
  5. ^ "Ontario is the largest province in the country by population". Statistics Canada. http://www40.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/getcans/sorth.cgi?lan=eng&dtype=fina&filename=demo02a.htm&sortact=2&sortf=6. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  6. ^ "Population of census metropolitan areas (2001 Census boundaries)". Statistics Canada. http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/demo05a.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  7. ^ Mithun, Marianne (2000). The Languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 312. 
  8. ^ "About Canada // Ontario". Study Canada. pp. Last Paragraph-second last sentence. http://www.studycanada.ca/english/about-ont.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-05. "Ontario's name is thought to come form the Iroquois word "Skanadario" which means "beautiful water"" 
  9. ^ Mills, David (1877). Report on the Boundaries of the Province of Ontario. Toronto: Hunter, Rose & Co.. p. 347. http://books.google.com/books?id=BlYCAAAAMAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s. Retrieved 2009-09-14. 
  10. ^ "Early Districts and Counties 1788-1899". Archives of Ontario. 2006-09-05. http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/on-line-exhibits/maps/ontario-districts.aspx. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  11. ^ "About Ontario; History: Government of Ontario". http://www.gov.on.ca/ont/portal/!ut/p/.cmd/cs/.ce/7_0_A/.s/7_0_252/_s.7_0_A/7_0_252/_l/en?docid=EC001034. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  12. ^ "Native America on the Eve of Contact". Digital History.
  13. ^ "Étienne Brûlé's article on Encyclopædia Britannica". Encyclopædia Britannica. http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9016763/Etienne-Brule. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  14. ^ a b "About Ontario; History; French and British Struggle for Domination". Government of Ontario. http://www.gov.on.ca/ont/portal/!ut/p/.cmd/cs/.ce/7_0_A/.s/7_0_252/_s.7_0_A/7_0_252/_l/en?docid=004520. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  15. ^ "The Contact Period". Ontarioarchaeology.on.ca.
  16. ^ "The Treaty of Paris (1763)". http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Paris_%281763%29. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  17. ^ "The Quebec Act of 1774". http://www.solon.org/Constitutions/Canada/English/PreConfederation/qa_1774.html. Retrieved 2007-01-15. 
  18. ^ "The Constitutional Act of 1791". http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~sprague/con91.htm. Retrieved 2007-01-15. 
  19. ^ Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada
  20. ^ a b "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data". Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population. 2007-03-13. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/popdwell/Table.cfm?T=302&SR=1&S=3&O=D&RPP=25&PR=35. Retrieved 2007-03-13. 
  21. ^ "Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Ontario)". Statistics Canada. 2005-09-01. http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/demo62g.htm. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  22. ^ "Canada's population". The Daily. Statistics Canada. 2006-09-27. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/060927/d060927a.htm. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  23. ^ "Selected Ethnic Origins1, for Canada, Provinces and Territories - 20% Sample Data". Statistics Canada. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/highlight/ETO/Table1.cfm?Lang=E&T=501&GV=1&GID=35. Retrieved 2007-12-18. 
  24. ^ "Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada Highlight Tables, 2006 Census". Statistics Canada. 2008-04-02. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/highlights/ethnic/pages/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&Code=35&Data=Count&Table=2&StartRec=1&Sort=3. Retrieved 2009-07-08. 
  25. ^ Selected Religions, for Canada, Provinces and Territories - 20% Sample Data
  26. ^ "Population by religion, by province and territory (2001 Census) (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan)". Statistics Canada. 2005-01-25. http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/demo30b.htm. Retrieved 2006-11-07. 
  27. ^ Statistics Canada "2001 Community Profiles". Statistics Canada. 2006-12-14. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/Profil01/CP01/Details/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=PR&Code1=35&Geo2=PR&Code2=01&Data=Count&SearchText=ontario&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=All&Custom= Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2007-01-12. 
  28. ^ "Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada Highlight Tables, 2006 Census". 2.statcan.ca. 2008-04-02. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/highlights/ethnic/pages/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&Code=01&Table=1&Data=Dist&StartRec=1&Sort=5&Display=Page&CSDFilter=5000. Retrieved 2009-06-16. 
  29. ^ StatCan - Native Population
  30. ^ Government of Ontario. "Ontario Facts: Overview". http://www.2ontario.com/facts/fact01.asp. Retrieved 2007-01-05. 
  31. ^ "Ontario is rich in hydroelectricity, especially areas near the Niagara River". Ontario Facts. http://www.2ontario.com/welcome/oout_508.asp. Retrieved 2007-02-02. 
  32. ^ Toyota's opening a new chapter in Woodstock's industrial history
  33. ^ "Ontario". Ministry of Economic Development and Trade. http://www.2ontario.com/welcome/oo_000.asp. Retrieved 2006-11-29. 
  34. ^ Ontario Unveils Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009
  35. ^ a b c Ministry of Transportation (Ontario) (August 6, 2002). "Ontario government investing $401 million to upgrade Highway 401". http://ogov.newswire.ca/ontario/GPOE/2002/08/06/c0057.html?lmatch=&lang=_e.html. Retrieved 2006-12-20. 
  36. ^ a b c Brian Gray (2004-04-10). "GTA Economy Dinged by Every Crash on the 401 - North America's Busiest Freeway". Toronto Sun, transcribed at Urban Planet. http://www.urbanplanet.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=3459. Retrieved 2007-03-18. "The "phenomenal" number of vehicles on Hwy. 401 as it cuts through Toronto makes it the busiest freeway in the world..." 
  37. ^ Statistics Canada "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data". Statistics Canada. 2008-11-05. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/popdwell/Table.cfm?T=202&PR=35&S=0&O=A&RPP=50 Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2009-04-01. 
  38. ^ "Ontario". 15q.net. 2007-02-24. http://www.15q.net/on.html. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  39. ^ "| Library | University of Waterloo". Lib.uwaterloo.ca. http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/cart/ont_road_chart.html. Retrieved 2009-05-06. 
  40. ^ Official Ontario Road Maps Produced -1971 - 2006
  41. ^ Measuring the Returns to Tourism Advertising - Butterfield et al. 37 (1): 12 - Journal of Travel Research
  42. ^ There's more to discover in Ontario

References

  • Michael Sletcher, 'Ottawa', in James Ciment, ed., Colonial America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History, (5 vols., M. E. Sharpe, New York, 2006).
  • Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada

Further reading

Ontario

  • Celebrating One Thousand Years of Ontario's History: Proceedings of the Celebrating One Thousand Years of Ontario's History Symposium, April 14, 15, and 16, 2000. Ontario Historical Society, 2000. 343 pp.
  • Baskerville, Peter A. Sites of Power: A Concise History of Ontario. Oxford U. Press., 2005. 296 pp. (first edition was Ontario: Image, Identity and Power, 2002). online review
  • Berton, Pierre. Niagara: A History of the Falls. (1992).
  • Hall, Roger; Westfall, William; and MacDowell, Laurel Sefton, eds. Patterns of the Past: Interpreting Ontario's History. Dundurn Pr., 1988. 406 pp.
  • McGowan, Mark George and Clarke, Brian P., eds. Catholics at the "Gathering Place": Historical Essays on the Archdiocese of Toronto, 1841-1991. Canadian Catholic Historical Assoc.; Dundurn, 1993. 352 pp.
  • McKillop, A. B. Matters of Mind: The University in Ontario, 1791-1951. U. of Toronto Press, 1994. 716 pp.
  • Mays, John Bentley. Arrivals: Stories from the History of Ontario. Penguin Books Canada, 2002. 418 pp.
  • Noel, S. J. R. Patrons, Clients, Brokers: Ontario Society and Politics, 1791-1896. U. of Toronto Press, 1990.

Ontario to 1869

  • Careless, J. M. S. Brown of the Globe (2 vols, Toronto, 1959–63), vol 1: The Voice of Upper Canada 1818-1859; vol 2: The Statesman of Confederation 1860-1880.
  • Clarke, John. Land Power and Economics on the Frontier of Upper Canada (2001) 747pp.
  • Clarke, John. The Ordinary People of Essex: Environment, Culture, and Economy on the Frontier of Upper Canada (2010)
  • Cohen, Marjorie Griffin. Women's Work, Markets, and Economic Development in Nineteenth-Century Ontario. (1988). 258 pp.
  • Craig, Gerald M Upper Canada: the formative years 1784-1841 McClelland and Stewart, 1963, the standard history online edition
  • Dunham, Eileen Political unrest in Upper Canada 1815-1836 (1963).
  • Errington, Jane The Lion, the Eagle, and Upper Canada: A Developing Colonial Ideology (1987).
  • Gidney, R. D. and Millar, W. P. J. Professional Gentlemen: The Professions in Nineteenth-Century Ontario. (1994).
  • Grabb, Edward, James Curtis, Douglas Baer; "Defining Moments and Recurring Myths: Comparing Canadians and Americans after the American Revolution" The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, Vol. 37, 2000
  • Johnson, J. K. and Wilson, Bruce G., eds. Historical Essays on Upper Canada: New Perspectives. (1975). . 604 pp.
  • Keane, David and Read, Colin, ed. Old Ontario: Essays in Honour of J. M. S. Careless. (1990).
  • Kilbourn, William.; The Firebrand: William Lyon Mackenzie and the Rebellion in Upper Canada (1956) online edition
  • Knowles, Norman. Inventing the Loyalists: The Ontario Loyalist Tradition and the Creation of Usable Pasts. (1997). 244 pp.
  • Landon, Fred, and J.E. Middleton. Province of Ontario: A History (1937) 4 vol. with 2 vol of biographies
  • Lewis, Frank and Urquhart, M.C. Growth and standard of living in a pioneer economy: Upper Canada 1826-1851 Institute for Economic Research, Queen's University, 1997.
  • McCalla, Douglas Planting the province: the economic history of Upper Canada 1784-1870 (1993).
  • McGowan, Mark G. Michael Power: The Struggle to Build the Catholic Church on the Canadian Frontier. (2005). 382 pp. online review from H-CANADA
  • McNairn, Jeffrey L The capacity to judge: public opinion and deliberative democracy in Upper Canada 1791-1854 (2000). online review from H-CANADA
  • Oliver, Peter. "Terror to Evil-Doers": Prisons and Punishments in Nineteenth-Century Ontario. (1998). 575 pp. post 1835
  • Rea, J. Edgar. "Rebellion in Upper Canada, 1837" Manitoba Historical Society Transactions Series 3, Number 22, 1965–66, historiography online edition
  • Reid, Richard M. The Upper Ottawa Valley to 1855. (1990). 354 pp.
  • Rogers, Edward S. and Smith, Donald B., eds. Aboriginal Ontario: Historical Perspectives on the First Nations. (1994). 448 pp.
  • Styran, Roberta M. and Taylor, Robert R., ed. The "Great Swivel Link": Canada's Welland Canal. Champlain Soc., 2001. 494 pp.
  • Westfall, William. Two Worlds: The Protestant Culture of Nineteenth-Century Ontario. (1989). 265 pp.
  • Wilton, Carol. Popular Politics and Political Culture in Upper Canada, 1800-1850. (2000). 311pp

Ontario since 1869

  • Azoulay, Dan. Keeping the Dream Alive: The Survival of the Ontario CCF/NDP, 1950-1963. (1997). 307 pp.
  • Baskerville, Peter A. Ontario: Image, Identity, and Power. (2002). 256pp
  • Cameron, David R. and White, Graham. Cycling into Saigon: The Conservative Transition in Ontario. (2000). 224 pp. Analysis of the 1995 transition from New Democratic Party (NDP) to Progressive Conservative (PC) rule in Ontario
  • Comacchio, Cynthia R. Nations Are Built of Babies: Saving Ontario's Mothers and Children, 1900-1940. (1993). 390 pp.
  • Cook, Sharon Anne. "Through Sunshine and Shadow": The Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Evangelicalism, and Reform in Ontario, 1874-1930. (1995). 281 pp.
  • Darroch, Gordon and Soltow, Lee. Property and Inequality in Victorian Ontario: Structural Patterns and Cultural Communities in the 1871 Census. U. of Toronto Press, 1994. 280 pp.
  • Devlin, John F. "A Catalytic State? Agricultural Policy in Ontario, 1791-2001." PhD dissertation U. of Guelph 2004. 270 pp. DAI 2005 65(10): 3972-A. DANQ94970 Fulltext: in ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
  • Evans, A. Margaret. Sir Oliver Mowat. U. of Toronto Press, 1992. 438 pp. Premier 1872-1896
  • Fleming, Keith R. Power at Cost: Ontario Hydro and Rural Electrification, 1911-1958. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 1992. 326 pp.
  • Gidney, R. D. From Hope to Harris: The Reshaping of Ontario's Schools. U. of Toronto Press, 1999. 362 pp. deals with debates and changes in education from 1950 to 2000
  • Gidney, R. D. and Millar, W. P. J. Inventing Secondary Education: The Rise of the High School in Nineteenth-Century Ontario. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 1990. 440 pp.
  • Halpern, Monda. And on that Farm He Had a Wife: Ontario Farm Women and Feminism, 1900-1970. (2001). 234 pp. online review from H-CANADA
  • Hines, Henry G. East of Adelaide: Photographs of Commercial, Industrial and Working-Class Urban Ontario, 1905-1930. London Regional Art and History Museum, 1989.
  • Hodgetts, J. E. From Arm's Length to Hands-On: The Formative Years of Ontario's Public Service, 1867-1940. U. of Toronto Press, 1995. 296 pp.
  • Houston, Susan E. and Prentice, Alison. Schooling and Scholars in Nineteenth-Century Ontario. U. of Toronto Press, 1988. 418 pp.
  • Ibbitson, John. Promised Land: Inside the Mike Harris Revolution. Prentice-Hall, 1997. 294 pp. praise for Conservatives
  • Kechnie, Margaret C. Organizing Rural Women: the Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario, 1897-1910. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 2003. 194 pp.
  • Landon, Fred, and J.E. Middleton. Province of Ontario: A History (1937) 4 vol. with 2 vol of biographies
  • Marks, Lynne. Revivals and Roller Rinks: Religion, Leisure and Identity in Late Nineteenth-Century Small-Town Ontario. U. of Toronto Press, 1996. 330 pp.
  • Montigny, Edgar-Andre, and Lori Chambers, eds. Ontario since Confederation: A Reader (2000).
  • Moss, Mark. Manliness and Militarism: Educating Young Boys in Ontario for War. (2001). 216 pp.
  • Neatby, H. Blair and McEown, Don. Creating Carleton: The Shaping of a University. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 2002. 240 pp.
  • Ontario Bureau of Statistics and Research. A Conspectus of the Province of Ontario (1947) online edition
  • Parr, Joy, ed. A Diversity of Women: Ontario, 1945-1980. U. of Toronto Press, 1996. 335 pp.
  • Ralph, Diana; Régimbald, André; and St-Amand, Nérée, eds. Open for Business, Closed for People: Mike Harris's Ontario. Fernwood, 1997. 207 pp. leftwing attack on Conservative party of 1990s
  • Roberts, David. In the Shadow of Detroit: Gordon M. McGregor, Ford of Canada, and Motoropolis. Wayne State U. Press, 2006. 320 pp.
  • Santink, Joy L. Timothy Eaton and the Rise of His Department Store. U. of Toronto Press, 1990. 319 pp.
  • Saywell, John T. "Just Call Me Mitch": The Life of Mitchell F. Hepburn. U. of Toronto Press, 1991. 637 pp. Biography of Liberal premier 1934-1942
  • Schryer, Frans J. The Netherlandic Presence in Ontario: Pillars, Class and Dutch Ethnicity. Wilfrid Laurier U. Press, 1998. 458 pp. focus is post WW2
  • Schull, Joseph. Ontario since 1867 (1978), narrative history
  • Stagni, Pellegrino. The View from Rome: Archbishop Stagni's 1915 Reports on the Ontario Bilingual Schools Question. McGill-Queen's U. Press, 2002. 134 pp.
  • Warecki, George M. Protecting Ontario's Wilderness: A History of Changing Ideas and Preservation Politics, 1927-1973.' Lang, 2000. 334 pp.
  • White, Graham, ed. The Government and Politics of Ontario. 5th ed. U. of Toronto Press, 1997. 458 pp.
  • White, Randall. Ontario since 1985. Eastendbooks, 1998. 320 pp.
  • Wilson, Barbara M. ed. Ontario and the First World War, 1914-1918: A Collection of Documents (Champlain Society, 1977)

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

North America : Canada : Ontario
Ottawa Parliament Hill
Ottawa Parliament Hill
For other places with the same name, see Ontario (disambiguation).
Ontario [1] is the most populous and second-largest province of Canada, home to the Canadian capital city of Ottawa, as well as Ontario's own capital Toronto, Canada's largest city. Ontario is bordered by the province of Quebec to the east, by the Great Lakes region of the United States to the south, by Manitoba to the west and by Hudson and James Bays to the north.

Understand

In addition to being Canada's most populous province, it is also a major tourist destination, especially around the Niagara Falls. Most of the population, more than 90% resides in the four regions that make up Southern Ontario, which covers a much smaller land area than the expansive north.
Ontario regions
Ontario regions
Golden Horseshoe (Greater Toronto Area, Niagara Peninsula)
The wealthiest and most urban of Ontario's regions, it contains a multitude of cities filled with museums, historic architecture, great restaurants, great shopping, nightclubs, and cultural institutions.
Eastern Ontario (National Capital Region, Ottawa)
A land of lakes and boreal forests, it also contains the elegant national capitol: Ottawa. Along the St. Lawrence River there is a multitude of historic towns
Southwestern Ontario
Central Ontario
Northern Ontario

Cities

Ontario has many cities. Here are nine of the major ones.
  • Toronto—Canada's largest city and capital of Ontario with 6.1 million people

Talk

English is spoken throughout Ontario. French is spoken in some parts of the province. Services are available in both English and French at all Federal and Provincial Government offices as well as many Municipal Government offices. Many large and small business offer services in French although this is not always mandated by statute. The closer one gets to Quebec, the more likely one is to be able to receive service in French in stores, restaurants and other businesses. Some banks and ATMs offer service in Chinese, particularly in Ottawa and Toronto.
More than 95% of the Ontarian population is fluent in English or French. More than 91% of the population is fluent in English.

Get in

Most visitors arrive in Ontario by way of Lester B. Pearson International Airport in Mississauga (a large city just outside of Toronto). Several flights from within Canada and from the United States land in Ottawa. If you are going to Windsor, you will land at Detroit Metro Airport just across the border.

Get around

By car

Let's be realistic -- Ontario is a large province and, as a result, the car is nearly the most convenient way to explore it. If you are arriving by plane initially, cars are easily rented if you are over 23, but easiest if you are over 25 years of age. The train offers you too little flexibility, and planes often only take you to major centres. Despite what you may have been led to believe, there is more to Ontario than Southern Ontario and Toronto (or Hamilton, or Niagara, or whatever). Coming from the USA, your options are numerous.
Here's a brief rundown of some of the most common crossings from the USA: International Falls, Minn. to Fort Frances, Ontario; Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan to Sault Ste Marie, Ontario; Port Huron, Michigan to Sarnia, Ontario; Detroit, Michigan to Windsor, Ontario; Buffalo, NY to Fort Erie, Ontario; Niagara Falls, NY to Niagara Falls, Ontario; Wolfe Island to Lansdowne; Massena to Cornwall.
In Northern Ontario, the car is a must if you wish to get from place to place. In most cases, you will be driving the TransCanada Highway (a cross-Canada network of highways, often offering more than one route), either on Highway 17 or Highway 11. 17 follows a more Southerly route hugging Lake Superior, while 11 ventures Northward at North Bay and heads through a slightly less populous region of the province before heading southwards. Do note that 11 and 17 come together in the Thunder Bay region. To the west, 11 heads to its end at Rainy River and the USA, while 17 heads up to lead to Manitoba.
If you are coming from Quebec, the southern routes are TransCanada Highways 20 and 40. 20 connects to the 401 (a direct route to Toronto) and 40 connects to 417 (heading to Ottawa). If your intentions are Northerly, the Ottawa route is the most direct.
From Manitoba, there really is only one option by car (unless you are coming via the USA), and that option is TransCanada Highway 1, which connects to 17 in Ontario.
NOTE: Even by car, you will be unable to access the Northern half of Ontario. Roads are the exception, not the rule, and you will rely on plane and train nearly anywhere north of Lake Nipigon.
Speed limits are posted in metric. Roadways are usually in good condition. On major highways, drivers routinely exceed the speed limit by 20 to 49 km/h despite the threat of hefty fines. Anyone caught exceeding the speed limit by 50 km/h or more, or making certain undesirable driving maneuvers such as racing, preventing others from passing or rushing to turn left on a fresh green light before the oncoming lanes have moved, can be hit with an automatic fine between $2000 and $10,000, a seven-day license suspension and a seven-day vehicle impound.
Lane discipline by drivers is considered mediocre at best. Although it is widely known that passing should be only done on the leftmost lanes, drivers routinely pass on the rightmost lanes, mostly due to slower drivers failing to change lanes to the rightmost lanes.
Ontario has High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes [2] on Highway 403 and 404. Cars and even motorcycles require at least two occupants per vehicle to use them around the clock. If you are coming from the USA, remember that motorcycles without passengers are banned from Ontario HOV lanes. It is different from most USA HOV lanes allowing motorcycles, even if without passengers, to get federal funds.

By bus

Within the Greater Toronto Area (which includes a large portion of the area around Toronto), GO Transit [3] is an option. The fees depend on distance to travel, but for the most part are reasonable. This is the best mode of public transit between cities and towns in this region. Unfortunately, government cutbacks have caused many direct buses to be done away with, so expect your bus ride to include numerous stops. GO also has train service in this area.
Greyhound Canada [4] travels to nearly 1,100 towns and cities in Canada, via 400 coaches during peak travel periods. As well, Coach Canada [5] is another big bus service that runs in partnership with Trentway Wagar Lines.
Pacific Western [6] offers charter services, which is available throughout the entire GTA, Mississauga, Brampton, Niagara Falls Region, Buffalo NY Airport and Montreal Airport. But, they could assist you with any transportation requirements outside of these areas including: All of Canada and the USA.
A quick, convenient, and frequent bus service that links Toronto to Toronto Pearson Airport is Airport Express [7], which operates at peak periods: every 20 minutes and off-peak periods: every 30 minutes. It picks up at both terminals, and stops at several major hotels in the downtown core. Adult fares are $18.95 one way, $29.25 for round trips. There is a 10% discount for online reservations.

By boat

From outside of the province, the only boat options are between the USA and Ontario. Recently, a ferry service opened connecting Rochester, NY to Toronto, Ontario; the service has been suspended and it is unclear whether or when it might resume operations. To be honest, however, ferry service is only recommended when it poses a substantial reduction to driving time.
Ontario contains many excellent recreational waterways including: the Great Lakes, the Rideau Canal, the Trent-Severn Waterway, the Ottawa and St Lawrence Rivers. The St Lawrence River includes the Thousand Islands region as well as the St Lawrence Seaway system.
The Niagara River is one of the wonders of our natural world although it is most definitely not a recreational waterway! The River includes the great cataract we know as Niagara Falls and is bypassed for navigational purposes by the Welland Ship Canal.
  • The Pelee Islander, tel: 1-800-661-2220. Daily trips to Pelee Island and mainland Ontario, Canada. Service from Sandusky is limited to once daily during the summer months, and is further restricted during the spring and fall. Advance vehicle reservations.
  • The MV Jiimaan, Jackson St, [8]. The largest passenger ferry along the Lake Erie route to Pelee Island. Leaves from the foot of Jackson St., Sandusky. To Lemington, Canada, Kingsville Govt. Dock, Ontario, Canada and Pelee Island, Ontario, Canada.

By train

Within Southern Ontario's Greater Toronto Area, GO Transit [9] is a convenient and fast way to travel, if you can do so either in the early and late rush hour periods.
Within Canada, Via Rail Canada [10] is the most common way to enter Ontario. It is not unheard of to enter Ontario from the USA by train, but the customs waits between the USA and Canada are no different than might be expected by car or plane, especially with the constant increases in Terror alerts south of the border.
The big exception to the above is if your destination is Northern Ontario (such as Moosonee or Lake Superior Provincial Park). There are train services to these areas that are your only options, excepting planes.

By plane

Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport [11] (IATA: YYZ), is the province's largest airport. The airport is a major hub for most Canadian air carriers. If your ultimate destination is in Southern Ontario, you will likely pass through Pearson at some point. Many flights from overseas will land in Toronto, and daily flights are available from many Canadian cities and most American hubs.
Ottawa has another international airport for destinations in Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Valley. There are fewer overseas flights terminating in Ottawa than in Toronto but the number is always increasing. Many American hubs also have daily direct flights into Ottawa.
In Southern Ontario, there are airports at Windsor, Sarnia, London, Hamilton and Kingston which are served by Air Canada and/or WestJet to various Canadian destinations (but most commonly only to Toronto). There is also an airport at Kitchener which is served by NorthWest Airlines to Detroit and Westjet to Calgary.
If you plan to travel to Northwestern Ontario or the North of Superior region, then Thunder Bay International Airport would be your best bet. Air Canada has direct flights from Toronto and Winnipeg, to name a few, and Westjet has flights from Hamilton and Winnipeg.
  • Old Fort William in Thunder Bay, a historical fort with the best historical reenactments available in Ontario
  • Lake Huron Lighthouses along Southwestern Ontario's Lake Huron coastline
  • The National Capital Region in Ottawa
  • Take in the view from the CN Tower in Toronto
  • Sainte-Marie among the Hurons [12], 1.5 hours north of Toronto on Hwy. 12, tel: +1705 5267838. French Jesuits settled here for 10 years until they fled in 1649 after attacks from the Iroquois.
  • Explore the Historic Nipissing Road [13] now part of the Trans Canada Trail. You can drive the road as well as hike it. See Magnetawan.
  • Hike the Sleeping Giant, a series of mesas that resemble a human figure, near Thunder Bay
  • Visit and hike through Temagami's Old Growth Forest, climb the Fire Tower and canoe Lake Temagami.
  • Dive around or take a boat tour of shipwrecks at Fathom Five National Marine Park at Tobermory
  • Camp at Bruce Peninsula National Park.
  • Visit Manitoulin Island, the largest freshwater lake island in the world.
  • Visit one of Ontario's freshwater sandy beaches: Wasaga Beach, Sauble Beach [14] or Grand Bend in Southwestern Ontario; Pancake Bay Provincial Park in Northern Ontario. Also visit these Ontario Parks [15] for great beaches: Sandbanks, Lake Superior, Awenda, Charleston Lake, and the Pinery.
  • Hike the Bruce Trail [16] (or portions of it) from Niagara Falls to Tobermory.
  • Camp at the Samantha Pockele Memorial Weekend in Chatham, Ontario on May 24/Victoria Weekend: A beer and music festival to celebrate the wonderful life of Chatham-Kent's human rights pioneer Samantha Pockele
  • Visit Point Pelee National Park and Pelee Island, the Southernmost point in Canada.
  • Camp and canoe at one of the province's extensive Provincial Parks: Algonquin Park, Quetico.
  • Ride the South Simcoe steam train [17] in Tottenham.
  • Follow the wine Road from Exit 78 on QEW to Niagara on the Lake (Map [18]) and visit some wineries.
  • Try Walleye and Bass fishing in Ahmic Lake in Magnetawan.
  • Mississauga offers a wide amount of biking/hiking trails with beautiful views of trees, birds, and the Credit River, despite being located in the Greater Toronto Area. Hardly crowded at all as well - and easy terrain.

Eat

The Greater Toronto Area, Golden Horseshoe, and Niagara Falls/Niagara Region each offer you a wide variety of Indian, Chinese, Thai, Italian, Mexican, fast food, and French cuisines (all formal and unformal).
Visit Gluten-Free Ontario[19] for a list of restaurants/bakeries in Ontario that offer gluten-free food.

Drink

In Ontario, the legal drinking age is 19. In Southern Ontario, you will find a great variety of beer and spirits at your disposal, while in Northern Ontario your options are usually limited to the most common North American standards. Do take note that drinking in public is discouraged by law in Ontario and most parts of Canada, exceptions being licensed patios and the like.

Where

Beer is available from the Beer Store [20] (run by Molson, Labatt and Sleeman), while beer, wine and other alcohol is available from the Liquor Control Board of Ontario [21], commonly called the LCBO, (run by the government). In Northern Ontario, you will typically only see the LCBO (and this will also be the case in some rural areas of Southern Ontario). The only time you will ever see alcohol in a grocery store is when that store has an internal LCBO. You can also buy wine at the Wine Rack [22] in some areas.
Of course, pubs and bars are no rarity in Ontario. In nearly every community you will enter, you will be able to find at least one tavern or bar. A domestic bottled beer will typically cost around $3.50 and a cocktail-type drink around $4.50 or higher. Expect the prices to vary, with prices being much higher in urban centres.

Beer

Ontario has an active beer culture that has blossomed recently in Southern Ontario in particular. Below are some of the breweries you can expect to find:

Wine

The Niagara region, home to Niagara Falls and Niagara on the Lake, is Ontario's premier wine-production region.
Ontario has a comparatively young wine industry that is expanding rapidly. Ontario, and Canada in general, is renowned for its consistent and unique ice wines. It is also gaining increasing recognition for its world-class premium table wines.
It's wine regions are right in the middle of the northern grape-growing belt – between 41° and 44° north. That puts southern Ontario just south of the famous Bordeaux Region in France, and parallel with northern California wine regions. Ontario is considered a "cool climate region" – which means at harvest time grapes are blessed with more concentrated flavours and balanced acidity which makes them wonderfully food friendly. That's why cooler climate wines typically have a livelier flavour than those from hotter climates.
The Vinters Quality Association (VQA) is an association of wineries that provide insight into the quality of Ontario wines. When purchasing wine made in Ontario, look for a "VQA" logo on the bottle - this tells you the wine has been approved by the association. Keep in mind that there are still many wines that are not certified, but lack of certification does not necessarily mean a poor wine.

Smoke

In Ontario, recent Supreme Court rulings have made it difficult to convict on charges of possession, and police are generally lenient towards possession of up to 30 grams. However, buying, selling, cultivating (for non-medical use) and smoking marijuana in public is still illegal. The federal government has expressed a willingness to "get tough" on drugs, and as a result marijuana posession charges have jumped. Tourists are advised to avoid smoking marijuana in public areas, though the risk of criminal prosecution is miminal relative to most of the world.

Get out

Quebec, to the east, is the nearest populated area of Canada and presents an interesting contrast to Ontario.
  • Lake Erie Tour Route and Lighthouses. Go back to the mainland and see the shoreline. The drive (or boat ride) around Lake Erie takes you through the Working Waterfronts around Buffalo NY, Cleveland OH, Detroit MI, Erie PA, Toledo, OH, and southern Ontario and is intermingled with beautiful preservations of flora and fauna as well as the history of North America's first westward expansion, the Old Northwest Territory.
  • Ohio is directly south, ferries are available to Sandusky and Cedar Point.
This is a usable article. It gives a good overview of the region, its sights, and how to get in, as well as links to the main destinations, whose articles are similarly well developed. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

(There is currently no text in this page)


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Etymology

Probably from Wyandot ontari:io (great lake).

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Singular
Ontario
Plural
-
Ontario
  1. A lake between Ontario province and New York State.
  2. A province in eastern Canada that has Toronto as its capital.
  3. A city in California.
  4. A town in Oregon.

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related terms

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Probably from Wyandot ontari:io (great lake).

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Ontario m.
  1. Ontario (all senses)

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

Template:Infobox Province or territory of Canada
.Ontario (IPA: /ɒnˈtɛri.oʊ/) is a province located in the central part of Canada, the largest by population[1] and second largest, after Quebec, in total area.^ Sunset Country is located in the western part of the Canadian Province of Ontario.

^ Ontario is Canada 's second largest province and has the largest population in the country.
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A province of east-central Canada.
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

[2] .(Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are larger but are not provinces.^ CANADIAN Provinces and Territories Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland & Labrador Nova Scotia Nunavut Territory Northwest Territories Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon .
  • Ontario Map-Canadian Provinces, Maps Landforms Population History Climate, Ottawa, Toronto -World Atlas 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.worldatlas.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

) .Ontario is bordered by the provinces of Manitoba to the west and Quebec to the east, and the U.S. states (from west to east) of Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania (across Lake Erie), and New York to the south.^ Lake, a lake between the NE United States and S Canada, between New York and Ontario province: the smallest of the Great Lakes.
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

^ Its southern border is with the State of Minnesota and to the west is the Province of Manitoba.

^ Ontario is situated east of Manitoba and west of Qubec , and is bordered by the American states of New York , Ohio , Pennsylvania , Minnesota and Michigan .
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Most of Ontario's borders with the United States are natural, starting at the Lake of the Woods and continuing through four of the Great Lakes: Superior, Huron (which includes Georgian Bay), Erie, and Ontario, then along the Saint Lawrence River near Cornwall.^ Ontario surrounds the Great Lakes.

^ Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.

^ Ontario 's long American border is formed almost entirely by lakes and rivers, starting in Lake of the Woods and continuing through 4 Great Lakes to the Saint Lawrence River.

.Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.^ Ontario surrounds the Great Lakes.

^ Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.

^ Issues that span the Canadian province of Ontario.
  • Ontario - FriendFeed 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC friendfeed.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The capital of Ontario is Toronto, the largest city in Canada.^ Its capital and largest city is Toronto .
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

^ Toronto is the capital and the largest city.
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

^ The capital of Ontario is Toronto , its largest and most populous city.
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[3] .Ottawa, the capital of Canada, is located in Ontario as well.^ Note : Ottawa , Canada's capital, is in southeastern Ontario.
  • Ontario Definition | Definition of Ontario at Dictionary.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC dictionary.reference.com [Source type: General]

^ Ontario is also a political powerhouse, as home of Canada’s capital city Ottawa.

^ Ottawa , the capital city of Canada , is located in Ontario .

.The 2006 Census counted 12,160,282 residents in Ontario, which accounted for 38.5% of the national population.^ With over 12 million residents, Ontario is the largest province (by population) in the country.

^ The report found that as Ontario experienced a population growth - from 88,000 people in 1980 to 170,000 people in 2000 - it has also seen higher income levels for its residents.
  • New report names Ontario as 'new urban center' - DailyBulletin.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dailybulletin.com [Source type: News]

^ In particular, New Jersey asserts that 52,000 of its residents relocated to Ontario during the U.S. presidency of George W. Bush , forming the majority of the province's population.
  • Ontario - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[4]
.The province takes its name from Lake Ontario, which is thought to be derived from ontarí:io, a Huron word meaning "great lake",[5] or possibly skanadario which means "beautiful water" in Iroquoian.^ ORIGIN OF PROVINCE NAME: Derived from the Iroquois Indian word Kanadario , meaning "sparkling water" or "beautiful lake."

^ Ontario surrounds the Great Lakes.

^ And I thought Ontario had no natural beauty.
  • Ontario Photo Gallery by Henry Liu at pbase.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.pbase.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[6] .Along with New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Quebec, Ontario is one of the four original provinces of Canada when the nation was formed on July 1, 1867, by the British North America Act.^ By the British North America Act, which formed in 1867 the Dominion of Canada, the provinces have the right of direct taxation only.

^ Marie Realtors St.Catharines Realtors Ontario is one of the 4 original provinces of Canada when the nation was formed on Jul 1, 1867.

^ The other three original provinces are Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.
  • How to Find Hotels In Ontario, Canada | eHow.com 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.ehow.com [Source type: General]

[7]
Ontario is Canada's leading manufacturing province accounting for 52% of the total national manufacturing shipments in 2004.[8]

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of Ontario
See also: List of Ontario counties and Geography of Canada
Evolution of the borders of Ontario
File:Niagara falls aerial.id.jpg
Niagara Falls is a major tourist attraction in Ontario as well as a huge supplier of hydroelectric energy for the province.
The province consists of four main geographical regions:
.
  • The thinly populated Canadian Shield in the northwestern and central portions which covers over half the land area in the province; though mostly infertile land, it is rich in minerals and studded with lakes and rivers; sub-regions are Northwestern Ontario and Northeastern Ontario.
  • The virtually unpopulated Hudson Bay Lowlands in the extreme north and northeast, mainly swampy and sparsely forested; and
  • The temperate and therefore most populous region, the fertile Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence Valley in the south where agriculture and industry are concentrated.^ Ontario surrounds the Great Lakes.

    ^ This region is home to 90% of Ontario's population.
    • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The far north, northwestern and central parts of Ontario are part of the Canadian Shield , which, while not having fertile soil , produces minerals.
    • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Southern Ontario is further sub-divided into four regions; Southwestern Ontario (parts of which were formerly referred to as Western Ontario), Golden Horseshoe, Central Ontario (although not actually the province's geographic centre) and Eastern Ontario.
File:DSCN0019.JPG
Bruce Peninsula.
.Despite the absence of any mountainous terrain in the province, there are large areas of uplands, particularly within the Canadian Shield which traverses the province from northwest to southeast and also above the Niagara Escarpment which crosses the south.^ To the north lies a largely untouched landscape of forests and lakes, while the most heavily populated areas around Toronto and Ottawa are located in the southern region of the province.

^ The most dramatic feature of the landscape is the Niagara Escarpment , running roughly northwest from Niagara Falls to the Bruce Peninsula .
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The east is divided from the rest of the region by an extension of the Canadian Shield known as the Frontenac Axis , which crosses the St. Lawrence River east of Kingston and forms the Thousand Islands region.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The highest point is Ishpatina Ridge at 693 metres (2,270 ft) above sea level located in Temagami, Northeastern Ontario.^ A low plateau, it is generally no more than 1,500 feet (460 metres) above sea level , although it contains the highest point in the province, Ishpatina Ridge, which rises to 2,274 feet (693 metres) near Lake Temagami.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Covering only about 15 percent of the area of the province, Southern Ontario contains land of gentle relief; its lowest area—on the Ottawa River —is only 150 feet (45 metres) above sea level, and its highest point—in the Blue Mountains south of Georgian Bay—is just over 1,770 feet (540 metres) in elevation.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The highest point in Ontario is found at Ishpatina Ridge in the Timiskaming District, at an elevation of 2,274 feet (693 meters).

.The Carolinian forest zone covers most of the southwestern section, its northern extent is part of the Greater Toronto Area at the western end of Lake Ontario.^ Covering the higher parts of the south-western Palaeozoic area in most places are rolling hills of boulder clay or stony moraines; while the lower levels are plains gently sloping toward the nearest of the Great Lakes and sheeted with silt deposited in more ancient lakes when the St Lawrence outlet was blocked with ice at the end of the glacial period .

^ Toronto became Ontario's capital at the time of Confederation, and as the 19th century ended (and throughout the 20th century), Ontario became and remained Canada's economic center.
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Guest328 earlier (0) (0) Report Ontario, specifically the Greater Toronto area, has Sick Childrens Hospital which is one of the premier medical centres in the world for pediatrics.
  • Help Nova Scotia and Ontario??? 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.maybenow.com [Source type: General]

.The most well-known geographic feature is Niagara Falls, part of the much more extensive Niagara Escarpment.^ Wonders of Niagara Falls, these self-catered family lodgings offer value, and most of all a fun-filled filled vacation that will exceed all of your expectations.

^ The most dramatic feature of the landscape is the Niagara Escarpment , running roughly northwest from Niagara Falls to the Bruce Peninsula .
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Niagara Falls is near Buffalo , New York (Ontario is also known as "Upper New York").
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

.The Saint Lawrence Seaway allows navigation to and from the Atlantic Ocean as far inland as Thunder Bay in Northwestern Ontario.^ Ontario 's long American border is formed almost entirely by lakes and rivers, starting in Lake of the Woods and continuing through 4 Great Lakes to the Saint Lawrence River.

^ Pictures Of Native Americans A photo of a native american indian, photographed on a Ontario vaction in the tourist attraction of the Old Fort William Historic Park close to Thunder Bay, Ontario .

^ From Lake Ontario the St Lawrence emerges through the meshes of the Thousand Islands, where it crosses Archaean rocks, after which follow several rapids separated by quieter stretches before Montreal is reached at the head of ocean navigation.

.Northern Ontario occupies roughly 85% of the surface area of the province; conversely Southern Ontario contains 94% of the population.^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ ELASH : The power authority has found that in Ontario some of the best mix of wind conditions and access to power lines is found in populated areas along the Great Lakes.
  • Ontario’s green energy plan prompts back wind | Environment | PRI's The World 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.theworld.org [Source type: News]

^ It is the 2nd biggest province in total surface area (917741 km ~ 354341 mi), almost 15% of which is water.

.Point Pelee National Park is a peninsula in southwestern Ontario (near Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan) that extends into Lake Erie and is the southernmost extent of Canada's mainland.^ Point Pelee National Park will satisfy any birder's binoculars.

^ The southernmost part of Canada is also in Ontario.
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Broker will help sell or locate premium midsize cruisers in Southwestern Ontario or Detroit area.
  • Ontario Canada Boat Brokers Directory 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.cruising.ca [Source type: Academic]

Pelee Island and Middle Island in Lake Erie extend slightly farther. All are south of 42°N – slightly farther south than the northern border of California.

Territorial evolution

Land was not legally subdivided into administrative units until a treaty had been concluded with the native peoples ceding the land. .In 1788, while part of the Province of Quebec (1763-1791), southern Ontario was divided into four districts: Hesse, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, and Nassau.^ The area was known as Upper Canada from 1791 to 1841 and as Canada West from 1841 until 1867, when it became one of four provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The goal of Trees Ontario is to restore the province's tree planting capacity, especially throughout southern Ontario on private lands, by providing funding and planning support for its tree planting partners.
  • TREES ONTARIO | Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.newswire.ca [Source type: News]

^ The patterns of economic history may be about to repeat themselves in Ontario's north providing an economic boost for the entire province as well as spillovers into adjacent provinces such as Manitoba and Quebec.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

In 1792, the four districts were renamed: Hesse became the Western District, Lunenburg became the Eastern District, Mecklenburg became the Midland District, and Nassau became the Home District. Counties were created within the districts.
By 1798, there were eight districts: Eastern, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, and Western.
.By 1826, there were eleven districts: Bathurst, Eastern, Gore, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, and Western.^ Ontario is a big province, home to the nation's capital city (Ottawa), the country's favorite waterfall (Niagara Falls), and the world's tallest building (the CN Tower).

^ Central Ontario Eastern Ontario Greater Toronto Area Niagara Region Northern Ontario Ottawa Region Southwestern Ontario You'll be amazed by Ontario's diversity in environment, culture and history.

^ Condos for sale in Toronto, Ontario Homes for sale in London, Ontario Homes for sale in Barrie, Ontario Homes for sale in Ajax, Ontario Homes for sale in Ottawa, Ontario Homes for sale in Vancouver, BC Homes for sale in Victoria, BC Homes for sale in Nanaimo, BC Homes for sale in Vernon, BC Homes for sale in Vernon, BC Homes for sale in Vernon, BC Homes for sale in Quebec city, QC Condos for sale in Quebec city, QC Homes for sale in Montreal, QC Condos for sale in Montreal, QC .
  • ByTheOwner.com - Real Estate Canada - Homes "for sale by owner" - Sell your house, Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.bytheowner.com [Source type: General]

.By 1838, there were twenty districts: Bathurst, Brock, Colbourne, Dalhousie, Eastern, Gore, Home, Huron, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, Prince Edward, Simcoe, Talbot, Victoria, Wellington, and Western.^ Ontario is a big province, home to the nation's capital city (Ottawa), the country's favorite waterfall (Niagara Falls), and the world's tallest building (the CN Tower).

^ Central Ontario Eastern Ontario Greater Toronto Area Niagara Region Northern Ontario Ottawa Region Southwestern Ontario You'll be amazed by Ontario's diversity in environment, culture and history.

^ This sighting was on the eastern end of Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada on Dec.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

.In 1849, the districts of southern Ontario were abolished by the Province of Canada, and county governments took over certain municipal responsibilities.^ The populous regions of southern Ontario are divided into counties and regional municipalities.

^ Surrounded by three Great Lakes, Southern Ontario is a vast region that boasts some of Canada’s finest scenic wonders.
  • Real Estate Southern Ontario Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.cindycody.ca [Source type: News]

^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The Province of Canada also began creating districts in sparsely populated Northern Ontario with the establishment of Algoma District and Nipissing District in 1858.
The northern and western boundaries of Ontario were in dispute after Confederation. .Ontario's right to Northwestern Ontario was determined by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in 1884 and confirmed by the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889 of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.^ Ontario has been scientifically measured as the gayest province in Canada, with a 3.2 gay units, followed by Quebec, having 7.3 gay units (Liberace had 2.5, Elton John 1.1).
  • Ontario - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Prosperity increased as more and more people immigrated to Ontario from the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy.

^ Under the Constitutional Act of 1791, "Québec" was divided in two, and Ontario became Upper Canada.

.By 1899, there were seven northern districts: Algoma, Manitoulin, Muskoka, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, and Thunder Bay.^ Northern Ontario, as usually defined, lies north of a line drawn from the confluence of the Mattawa and Ottawa rivers (at the Quebec border, east of Lake Nipissing ) southwest to the mouth of the French River, on Georgian Bay .
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Thunder Bay has the largest open pit gemstone mine in North America; all types of amethyst are found there.

^ I live in Parry Sound, Ontario right on Georgian Bay in a small inlet directly east of Sandy Island.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

.Four more northern districts were created between 1907 and 1912: Cochrane, Kenora, Sudbury and Timiskaming.^ Between 1891 and 1911, northern Ontario's population went from four per cent to almost 11 per cent of Ontario's population as the north's population grew 220 per cent while that of the south only grew by 11 per cent.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

[9]

Climate

See also: Environment Canada
File:Lake Ontario - Sandbanks Provincial Park 2001.jpg
Enjoying summer at Sandbanks Provincial Park on Lake Ontario.
.Ontario has three main climatic regions.^ Surrounded by three Great Lakes, Southern Ontario is a vast region that boasts some of Canada’s finest scenic wonders.
  • Real Estate Southern Ontario Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.cindycody.ca [Source type: News]

^ Three main geological regions make up Ontario: the Great Lakes-St.

.Most of Southwestern Ontario, the cities of Windsor, London and the southern half of the Golden Horseshoe region including Hamilton, Niagara and the city of Toronto, have a moderate humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa), similar to that of the inland Mid-Atlantic States and the lower Great Lakes portion of the Midwestern United States.^ Ontario surrounds the Great Lakes.

^ Hopefully this is a sign of there recovery in the Southern Ontario and Great Lakes region.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

^ The capital of Ontario is Toronto , its largest and most populous city.
  • Ontario@Everything2.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The region has warm, humid summers and cold winters.^ The northernmost parts of Ontario - primarily north of the 50th parallel - have a sub~arctic climate with long, very cold winters and short, warm summers and dramatic temperature changes.

^ The clay belt is in latitudes south of Winnipeg , with a good summer climate but cold winters.

^ Winter is characterized by alternating currents of cold arctic air and relatively warm air masses from the Gulf of Mexico.

Extreme heat and cold usually occur for short periods. It is considered a temperate climate when compared with most of continental Canada. .In the summer, the air masses often come out of the southern United States, as the stronger the Bermuda High Pressure ridges into the North American continent, the more warm, humid air is drawn northward from the Gulf of Mexico.^ Between 1891 and 1901, Ontario's population growth crawled to a virtual halt and out-migration of its young people to the United States became a chronic lament.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

^ Severe thunderstorms peak in frequency in June and July in most of the province, although in Southern Ontario they can occur at any time from March to November due to the collision of colder, Arctic air and warm, moist Gulf air.

^ World War II (1939–1945) brought both the United States and Canada out of the depths of the Depression.

.Particularly in the fall and winter, temperatures are moderated by the delayed cooling of the Great Lakes, making it considerably milder than the rest of the province and allowing for a longer growing season than areas at similar latitudes in the continent's interior.^ The province gets its name from a Huron/Iriquois word "Onitariio" meaning "great lake" or "beautiful water".

^ Due to the tempering effect of the great lakes and the southern location of the city within Canada, Toronto’s climate is fairly mild, making it a great city to explore on foot.

^ Because of the influence of the Great Lakes, Ontario experiences smaller variations in temperature and higher precipitation than would otherwise be expected for a region in the heart of a continent.

Both spring and fall are generally pleasantly mild, with cool nights. .Annual precipitation ranges from 75-100 centimetres (30-40 in) and is well distributed throughout the year with a summer peak.^ On a $100,000 fixed-rate loan at 8% annual percentage rate APR, for example, you will pay $90,000 less in interest on a 15-year mortgage than on a 30-year.
  • Loan Release Forms Free Ontario Canada - Mortgage Above My Pay Grade 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.westga.edu [Source type: General]

.Most of this region lies in the lee of the Great Lakes making for abundant snow in some areas while others usually receive less snow than most of Canada because of the shorter, milder winter.^ The public and high schools tend rather to follow American than British methods, though less freedom is allowed to the local authorities than in most of the American states.

^ Hopefully this is a sign of there recovery in the Southern Ontario and Great Lakes region.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

^ Most people in Ontario live along the border with the US. This is because they all want to be Americans, but being inferior, are not allowed to partake in our greatness.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

File:LondonOntarioSkyline.jpg
The Thames river in London, Ontario.
.The second climatic zone covers the northern half of Southern Ontario, including the northern portion of the Golden Horseshoe, Central, Eastern Ontario (includes Ottawa) and the southern reaches of Northern Ontario, including the cities of Sudbury and North Bay, which have a more severe humid continental climate (Koppen Dfb).^ I live ~5 hours from Ottawa (more north!
  • Boundless Line: I'm Here: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.boundlessline.org [Source type: General]

^ Central Ontario Eastern Ontario Greater Toronto Area Niagara Region Northern Ontario Ottawa Region Southwestern Ontario You'll be amazed by Ontario's diversity in environment, culture and history.

^ Northwestern Ontario offers many attractions, both in cities such as Thunder Bay and in nature reserves such as Quetico Provincial Park .
  • Ontario Tourism, Travel Information: WorldWeb.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.ontario.worldweb.com [Source type: News]

.This region has warm and sometimes hot summers (although considerably shorter in length than Southwestern Ontario) with cold, longer winters with roughly equal annual precipation to the south.^ Central Ontario Eastern Ontario Greater Toronto Area Niagara Region Northern Ontario Ottawa Region Southwestern Ontario You'll be amazed by Ontario's diversity in environment, culture and history.

^ The northern parts as far south as the north shore of Lake Superior have long and cold but bright winters, sometimes with temperatures reaching 50° F. below zero ; while their summers are delightful, with much sunshine and some hot days but pleasantly cool nights.

^ Mean annual summer temperatures reach 72° F (22° C ) in the south, where the temperate climate and fertile soils nurture a major agricultural industry.

.The southern part of this zone lies on the windward side of Lake Huron.^ All the other rivers in southern Ontario are tributaries of the lakes or of the St Lawrence, the Ottawa, navigable in many parts, being the largest, and the Trent next in importance.

^ The Canadian Shield, covering the rest of northern Ontario from Lake Superior to Hudson Bay, and extending into the southern part of the province, is a vast rocky plateau.

.As with the eastern shore of Lake Superior in winter, frequent heavy lake effect snow squalls affect much of the Georgian Bay shoreline including Killarney, Parry Sound, Muskoka and Simcoe County; extending southward on the Lake Huron shore from Bruce Peninsula to Sarnia, sometimes reaching inland to London.^ The northern parts as far south as the north shore of Lake Superior have long and cold but bright winters, sometimes with temperatures reaching 50° F. below zero ; while their summers are delightful, with much sunshine and some hot days but pleasantly cool nights.

^ Lakes Superior and Huron both reach depths hundreds of feet below sea-level, but the next lake in the series, St Clair, towards which Lake Huron drains southward through St Clair river, is very shallow and marshy.

^ The Princes' Gate lies at the eastern end of the Canadian National Exhibition grounds on the shores of Lake Ontario in Toronto.

.Wind-whipped snow squalls can reach areas as far as 100 kilometres (60 mi) or greater from the shore when surface winds are strong, but the heaviest snows usually fall within 20 kilometres (12 mi) from the shoreline.^ It was a very snowy day , my camera was unable to get very clear shots due to the snow fall.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

^ Oakville Ontario Yesterday we had a snow storm with temperatures in the -20 degree area and my husband and I spotted an American Bald Eagle perched on a tree overlooking Lake Ontario.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

Some snowbelt areas in this region receive an annual average of well over 300 centimetres (120 in) of snow, combined with moderate cold making for excellent winter recreation conditions.
.The northernmost parts of Ontario—primarily north of 50°N—have a subarctic climate (Koppen Dfc) with long, severely cold winters and short, cool to warm summers and dramatic temperature changes.^ The best thing Ontario's government can do is to continue working with the First Nations and build the groundwork to develop institutions for the co-operative development of the area north of 50.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

^ Ontario's government recognizes that the north's economy is poised to undergo dramatic changes in the near future and to that effect has commissioned a Northern Growth Plan.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

^ Several long-distance trails in Southern Ontario such as the Bruce and Ganaraska trails offer multi-day hikes with the convenience of lodging at nearby towns.
  • Hiking Trails in Ontario, Canada - Canada Trails 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.canadatrails.ca [Source type: General]

.In summer, hot weather occasionally reaches even the northernmost parts of Ontario for brief periods, although humidity is generally lower than in the south.^ Even though Southern Ontario (south of Algonquin Park) has a lot of farmland and urban sprawl there are plenty of trails within an hour's drive.
  • Hiking Trails in Ontario, Canada - Canada Trails 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.canadatrails.ca [Source type: General]

^ Planet, Captain who came to Ontario to destroy the fossil fuel power generators in Toronto, but was sadly killed when he went for a quiet evening swim in Lake Ontario.
  • Ontario - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The northern parts as far south as the north shore of Lake Superior have long and cold but bright winters, sometimes with temperatures reaching 50° F. below zero ; while their summers are delightful, with much sunshine and some hot days but pleasantly cool nights.

With no major mountain ranges blocking sinking Arctic air masses, temperatures of -40 °C (-40 °F) are not uncommon. .The snow stays on the ground much longer in here than other regions of Ontario; snow cover is usually present to some extent between October and May.^ Though it's been a cooler summer than we're used to here in Ontario so far, the snow is long gone.
  • Boundless Line: I'm Here: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.boundlessline.org [Source type: General]

^ Living in the middle of Lake Ontario is much more pleasant than living in the middle of the province of Ontario, even without a boat.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are more "fun facts" about Ontario than any other Canadian Province except for Labrador, but it is hard to compete with those cute dogs.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

Severe and non-severe thunderstorms peak in frequency from June through August when Ontario becomes an active thunderstorm zone, due to the median position of the continental storm track and increased warmth and humidity. .In Southern Ontario, they can occur at any time from March to November because of the frequent collision of colder, Arctic air and warm, moist Gulf air.^ Most people in Ontario live along the border with the US. This is because they all want to be Americans, but being inferior, are not allowed to partake in our greatness.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Trillium The floral emblem of Ontario, the trillium, occurs with sufficient frequency on the governmental flags of the province that it deserves a separate discussion.
  • Ontario 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.fraser.cc [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was about 5:00PM. I've live in BC for three years and have seen many Bald Eagles, but I had no idea they had a population in Southern Ontario.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

In summer, isolated or cluster type thunderstorms also form from daytime convective heating. .One severe type of thunderstorm is known as a Derecho also common to the midwest US, which is a larger cluster-type thunderstorm mass, often occurring nocturnally and with great forward motion, bringing severe straight-line winds over wide areas and can be damaging to forests.^ He wants the city to focus on one or two key projects that are of particular importance to residents and bring them forward to the province.
  • Council blasts Northern Ontario Growth Plan - The Sudbury Star - Ontario, CA 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.thesudburystar.com [Source type: General]

^ Hundreds of lakes in Ontario became severely damaged; forests and farms were affected as well.

.These storms usually develop along stationary frontal boundaries during hot weather periods and can occur in most areas of the province covering great distances during their lifespan.^ The spruce timber covering much of the area is of great value, compensating for the labour of clearing the land.

^ The great agricultural development of the western provinces, in which manufactures are little advanced, has given a great impetus to the industries of the older provinces, especially Ontario.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

.Only the Hudson/James Bay Lowlands region rarely experience one.^ In the James Bay Lowlands, in Ontario's so called "Ring of Fire," there are more than 100 mining companies with holdings.
  • History on side of Ontario's economy - Winnipeg Free Press 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.winnipegfreepress.com [Source type: General]

^ The Hudson Bay Lowlands are narrow coastal plains bordering Hudson Bay and James Bay; the land is wet and covered by scrub growth.

^ The Canadian Shield and the Hudson Bay Lowlands cover 90 percent of the province's territory.

.The areas with the highest severe weather frequency in the province are extreme Southwestern (Windsor, Chatham) and Central Ontario (Simcoe County), both areas get storms that can be stronger because of the localized Lake Breeze Front.^ The cities of Windsor , London , Stratford and Kitchener in Southwestern Ontario offer an abundance of activities, from the cultural Stratford Festival to Kitchener's renowned Oktoberfest .
  • Ontario Tourism, Travel Information: WorldWeb.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.ontario.worldweb.com [Source type: News]

^ Glorious Indirect Lakefront location right on Lake Simcoe .Watch the sunset from the huge front deck or the large bay window in the living .
  • ByTheOwner.com - Real Estate Canada - Homes "for sale by owner" - Sell your house, Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.bytheowner.com [Source type: General]

^ Central Ontario Eastern Ontario Greater Toronto Area Niagara Region Northern Ontario Ottawa Region Southwestern Ontario You'll be amazed by Ontario's diversity in environment, culture and history.

[10] .London has the most lightning strikes per year in Canada and is also one of the most active areas in the country for storms.^ The area was known as Upper Canada from 1791 to 1841 and as Canada West from 1841 until 1867, when it became one of four provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One of Canada 's most populated provinces, Ontario is a prime tourist destination.
  • Ontario Tourism, Travel Information: WorldWeb.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.ontario.worldweb.com [Source type: News]

^ With a 2001 population of 11.4 million people, Ontario is Canada's most heavily populated province, with over one-third of the country's total population.

.In typical year, Ontario averages 20 or more confirmed tornado touchdowns, with the highest frequency in southwestern Ontario and near Lake Simcoe.^ A low plateau, it is generally no more than 1,500 feet (460 metres) above sea level , although it contains the highest point in the province, Ishpatina Ridge, which rises to 2,274 feet (693 metres) near Lake Temagami.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ With the completion of the St. Lawrence Seaway five years later, ocean-going ships were allowed access to southern and western Ontario through the Great Lakes.

^ Barry Blostein Executive Search Toronto, Ontario, Canada In the practice of search for more than 20 years.
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

They are rarely destructive (the vast majority are classified as F0 or F1 on the Fujita Scale). .In Northern Ontario, some tornadoes go undetected by ground spotters because of the sparse population and remote landscape; they are often discovered after the fact by aircraft pilots, where aerial observations of damaged forest confirm occurrences.^ Those looking for a wilderness challenge will find it in the rugged wilderness of the Canadian Shield of Northern Ontario where there are few secondary roads and a sparse population.
  • Hiking Trails in Ontario, Canada - Canada Trails 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.canadatrails.ca [Source type: General]

^ And if things don't start picking up soon, smaller Ontario beef farmers fear they will go 1 2 3 ...
  • Ontario - Timmins Daily Press - Ontario, CA 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.timminspress.com [Source type: General]

^ Some of these partnerships include the Wildlife Working Group, the Strategic Plan for Ontario Fisheries, and the Forest Management Agreements.

History

See also: History of Canada and Timeline of Ontario history

European contact

.Before the arrival of the Europeans, the region was inhabited both by Algonquian (Ojibwa, Cree and Algonquin) and Iroquoian (Iroquois and Huron) tribes.^ Before European settlement, the area was inhabited by North American Indians (First Nations), including the Iroquois and the Algonquin.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The European explorers encountered the Iroquois and Algonquin descendants of those first migrants in the 17th century.

[11] .The French explorer Étienne Brûlé explored part of the area in 1610-12.[12] The English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into Hudson Bay in 1611 and claimed the area for England, but Samuel de Champlain reached Lake Huron in 1615, and French missionaries began to establish posts along the Great Lakes.^ From its centre at Quebec French civilization extended along the Mississippi and the Great Lakes, and also northwards to Hudson's Bay .

^ Three years later, in 1613, Samuel de Champlain and Étienne Brûlé made the first contacts with the aboriginal, or native, people in the southern part of the province.

^ In Ontario the Albany, Moose , Missanabi and Abitibbi flow into Hudson Bay, but none of these rivers is navigable except for canoes.

French settlement was hampered by their hostilities with the Iroquois, who allied themselves with the British.[13]
File:UnitedEmpireLoyalistsHamilton.JPG
United Empire Loyalists, statue, McMaster University Downtown Centre, Main Street East
.The British established trading posts on Hudson Bay in the late 17th century and began a struggle for domination of Ontario.^ The Canadian Shield and the Hudson Bay Lowlands cover 90 percent of the province's territory, but are home to only 10 percent of Ontario's population.

^ Farther north, in what is now New Ontario, their English rivals, the Hudson's Bay Company, had more or less permanent posts, especially at Fort Albany and Moose Factory.

^ In Ontario the Albany, Moose , Missanabi and Abitibbi flow into Hudson Bay, but none of these rivers is navigable except for canoes.

.The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War by awarding nearly all of France's North American possessions (New France) to Britain.^ That same year, Canada joined the US and Mexico in signing the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was built upon the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement.

[14] .The region was annexed to Quebec in 1774.[15] From 1783 to 1796, the United Kingdom granted United Empire Loyalists leaving the United States following the American Revolution 200 acres (0.8 km²) of land and other items with which to rebuild their lives.^ Between1782-1784about 5000 loyalists entered Ontario, and were given liberal grants of land by the British government.

^ This area was populated by a large number of Loyalists (American colonists who had sided with Great Britain) after the American Revolution.

^ The company was backed by an investment firm, the Kuwait-American Corp in canada australia ireland and the united kingdom all prizes are immediately paid out as one lump sum tax free to the winner in the united states .
  • Loan Release Forms Free Ontario Canada - Mortgage Above My Pay Grade 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.westga.edu [Source type: General]

[13] This measure substantially increased the population of Canada west of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence during this period, a fact recognized by the Constitutional Act of 1791, which split Quebec into The Canadas: Upper Canada southwest of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence, and Lower Canada east of it. John Graves Simcoe was appointed Upper Canada's first Lieutenant-Governor in 1793.[16]
.American troops in the War of 1812 invaded Upper Canada across the Niagara River and the Detroit River but were defeated and pushed back by British regulars, Canadian militias, and First Nations warriors.^ Ontario was important in the War of 1812, where the Americans bombed then-York into submission so badly that they had to change the name to "Toronto".
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Around dusk a mature American Bald Eagle flew across our yard on Wolfe Island, on the bank of the St. Lawrence River in Ontario, Canada.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

^ The equality of representation, granted at the union, at first unfair to Lower Canada, became still more unfair to Upper Canada, as her population first equalled and then surpassed that of her sister province.

.The Americans gained control of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, however, and during the Battle of York occupied the Town of York (later named Toronto) in 1813. The Americans looted the town and burned the Parliament Buildings but were soon forced to leave.^ Also a short distance from Toronto is the breathtaking, must-see Niagara Falls and the theatre festival town of Niagara-on-the-Lake should not be missed by visitors to the area.
  • Ontario Tourism, Travel Information: WorldWeb.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.ontario.worldweb.com [Source type: News]

^ Planet, Captain who came to Ontario to destroy the fossil fuel power generators in Toronto, but was sadly killed when he went for a quiet evening swim in Lake Ontario.
  • Ontario - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC uncyclopedia.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ K Consulting York, Toronto, Ontario, Canada We are a full service recruitment firm specializing in ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.After the War of 1812, relative stability allowed for increasing numbers of immigrants to arrive from Britain and Ireland rather than from the United States.^ The units have a simpler design than reactors built in the United States, but are more difficult to keep running safely.

^ For a time the War of1812-1814with the United States put an end to the strife.

^ The public and high schools tend rather to follow American than British methods, though less freedom is allowed to the local authorities than in most of the American states.

As was the case in the previous decades, this deliberate immigration shift was encouraged by the colonial leaders. .Despite affordable and often free land, many arriving newcomers from Europe (mostly from Britain and Ireland) found frontier life with the harsh climate difficult, and some of those with the means eventually returned home or went south.^ In many cases, a 5% down payment on a $200,000 home would mean that your down payment would be $10,000.
  • Loan Release Forms Free Ontario Canada - Mortgage Above My Pay Grade 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.westga.edu [Source type: General]

^ Many people in the UK experience credit problems at some point in their life time, often through no fault of their own companies will benefit from a interest free loan for years costs of a project up to a maximum of million in the form of a repayable loan .
  • Loan Release Forms Free Ontario Canada - Mortgage Above My Pay Grade 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.westga.edu [Source type: General]

However, population growth far exceeded emigration in the decades that followed. .Still, a mostly agrarian-based society, canal projects and a new network of plank roads spurred greater trade within the colony and with the United States, thereby improving relations over time.^ Ontario's already extensive trade with the United States.

^ For a time the War of1812-1814with the United States put an end to the strife.

^ Though based rather on the simple English model than on the more complicated municipal governments of the United States , it has certain features of its own, and is revised from year to year.

Meanwhile, Ontario's numerous waterways aided travel and transportation into the interior and supplied water power for development. .As the population increased, so did the industries and transportation networks, which in turn led to further development.^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.By the end of the century, Ontario vied with Quebec as the nation's leader in terms of growth in population, industry, arts and communications.^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Municipal spending on the arts was C $58 per person, and federal spending on the arts in Ontario was C $98 per person, slightly higher than the national average of C $96.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

[17]
.Many in the colony, however, began to chafe against the aristocratic Family Compact that governed while benefiting economically from the regions resources, and who did not allow elected bodies the power to effect change (much as the Château Clique ruled Lower Canada).^ Construction/Building Government of Canada/Public Works Economic News/Trends and Analysis Environmental Services Real Estate Transportation/Trucking Construction/Building .
  • Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop – Daily Commercial News 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dcnonl.com [Source type: News]

This resentment spurred republican ideals and sowed the seeds for early Canadian nationalism. .Accordingly, rebellion in favour of responsible government rose in both regions; Louis-Joseph Papineau led the Lower Canada Rebellion and William Lyon Mackenzie led the Upper Canada Rebellion.^ In 1840, the Act of Union reunited Upper and Lower Canada, this time under the name Canada.

^ Once granted responsible government, and the liberty to make her own mistakes, Upper Canada went ahead.

^ The equality of representation, granted at the union, at first unfair to Lower Canada, became still more unfair to Upper Canada, as her population first equalled and then surpassed that of her sister province.

.Although both rebellions were put down in short order, the British government sent Lord Durham to investigate the causes of the unrest.^ Thus forcibly reminded of the existence of Canada, the British government sent out Lord Durham to investigate, and as a result of his report the two Canadas were in 1841 united in a legislative union.

.He recommended that self-government be granted and that Lower and Upper Canada be re-joined in an attempt to assimilate the French Canadians.^ In 1840, the Act of Union reunited Upper and Lower Canada, this time under the name Canada.

^ Once granted responsible government, and the liberty to make her own mistakes, Upper Canada went ahead.

^ The equality of representation, granted at the union, at first unfair to Lower Canada, became still more unfair to Upper Canada, as her population first equalled and then surpassed that of her sister province.

.Accordingly, the two colonies were merged into the Province of Canada by the Act of Union (1840), with the capital at Kingston, and Upper Canada becoming known as Canada West.^ In 1840, the Act of Union reunited Upper and Lower Canada, this time under the name Canada.

^ Ontario was once known as "Upper Canada."
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Since Federation Upper Canada has been known as the province of Ontario.

.Parliamentary self-government was granted in 1848. There were heavy waves of immigration in the 1840s, and the population of Canada West more than doubled by 1851 over the previous decade.^ There are more jobs out west in alberta and bc then in ontario or the maritimes.
  • Dental Hygienist Jobs Forum - DH license from Ontario to BC | Indeed.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.indeed.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Once granted responsible government, and the liberty to make her own mistakes, Upper Canada went ahead.

^ There are more than 50 public libraries focusing on the province's First Nations (native people, including Métis, and Inuits).

.As a result for the first time the English-speaking population of Canada West surpassed the French-speaking population of Canada East, tilting the representative balance of power.^ NAV CANADA announces first quarter financial results (2010-01-13) .
  • Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop – Daily Commercial News 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dcnonl.com [Source type: News]

^ In 2001, English was the mother tongue of 70.6 percent of Ontario's residents, while French was the primary language of 4.3 percent of Ontarians and 23.7 percent had other first languages (1.4 percent had two or more native languages).

^ The equality of representation, granted at the union, at first unfair to Lower Canada, became still more unfair to Upper Canada, as her population first equalled and then surpassed that of her sister province.

An economic boom in the 1850s coincided with railway expansion across the province further increasing the economic strength of Central Canada.
.A political stalemate between the French- and English-speaking legislators, as well as fear of aggression from the United States during the American Civil War, led the political elite to hold a series of conferences in the 1860s to effect a broader federal union of all British North American colonies.^ To the new province were given English civil and criminal law , a legislative assembly and council and a lieutenant-governor; in the words of its first governor, Colonel John Graves Simcoe , it had, "the British Constitution, and all the forms which secure and maintain it."

^ In the midst of all this gloomy news and setbacks, working people and their unions do see the opportunity to expose those that led us to this crisis, internationally as well as here in Canada.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ In 1964, the federal governments of Canada and the United States negotiated the Canada–United States Automotive Agreement (also known as the Auto Pact), an agreement that permitted the free trade of automotive parts and vehicles between the two countries.

.The British North America Act took effect on July 1, 1867, establishing the Dominion of Canada, initially with four provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario.^ By the British North America Act, which formed in 1867 the Dominion of Canada, the provinces have the right of direct taxation only.

^ The area was known as Upper Canada from 1791 to 1841 and as Canada West from 1841 until 1867, when it became one of four provinces of the new Dominion of Canada.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Halifax Nannies Dot Com Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada A nanny agency placing nannies in Halifax, throughout Nova ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.The Province of Canada was divided into Ontario and Quebec so that each linguistic group would have its own province.^ International Nannies and Homecare Ltd Ontario, Canada Part of the AllWorldJobs.com Group © 2006-2009 All Rights Reserved All World Jobs Ltd.
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ The Laudi Group Toronto, Ontario, Canada The Laudi Group is a hybrid search firm dedicated to the ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ Derhak Ireland & Partners Etobicoke, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Randstad Montréal, Quebec, Canada Randstad is a provider of professional employment services ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.Both Quebec and Ontario were required by section 93 of the BNA Act to safeguard existing educational rights and privileges of the Protestant and Catholic minorities.^ Tundra Technical Solutions Toronto, Ontario, Canada ITN Mark Education Ontario, Canada Cobblestone Human Captial Montréal, Quebec, Canada Diligent, thorough, timely and effective, Cobblestone Human ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.Thus, separate Catholic schools and school boards were permitted in Ontario.^ After a long and bitter struggle the Roman Catholics won in 1863 the right to separate schools.

^ The Roman Catholic claim to separate state-aided schools, at length conceded in 1863, long set the religious bodies by the ears.

^ Although many Roman Catholic children attend the public schools, the number of separate schools is, under the influence of the priesthood, steadily increasing.

.However, neither province had a constitutional requirement to protect its French- or English-speaking minority.^ English is the only official language, but Ontario's French speakers play an essential part in the province's cultural life and are the largest language minority The provincial government provides services in French in the regions where the French-speaking population is sufficiently high.

.Toronto was formally established as Ontario's provincial capital.^ Toronto, Ontario's capital and Canada's largest city, had a population of 4.37 million in 2001.

^ Toronto, the provincial capital, has grown from S9,000 in 1871 to about 300,000, partly through the absorption of neighbouring towns and villages.

^ Toronto, Ontario, Canada Established in 1986, AKI is a consulting and training ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

Province of Ontario

.Once constituted as a province, Ontario proceeded to assert its economic and legislative power.^ By 15 August, Ontario Hydro had reestablished 75 percent of the power in the province, although rolling blackouts were still occurring.

.In 1872, the lawyer Oliver Mowat became premier and remained as premier until 1896. He fought for provincial rights, weakening the power of the federal government in provincial matters, usually through well-argued appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.^ The provincial government licenses logging rights.

^ The structure of the provincial government reflects that of the federal government.

^ The great struggle of the time was with the federal government on the question of provincial rights.

.His battles with the federal government greatly decentralized Canada, giving the provinces far more power than John A. Macdonald had intended.^ Invasive scanners coming Posted 8 days ago in News / Ontario The federal government is ordering 44 virtual strip-search scanners for Canada's major airports, Transport Minister John Baird said yesterday.
  • Ontario - Timmins Daily Press - Ontario, CA 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.timminspress.com [Source type: General]

^ Railways gridiron the province, which contains over one-third the total mileage of the dominion; their construction is aided by provincial and municipal subsidies, in addition to that paid by the federal government.

^ In so far as these had other causes than the Anglo-Saxon love of faction , they were due to the formation by the loyalists, their descendants and hangers-on of a clique who more and more engrossed political and social power.

.He consolidated and expanded Ontario's educational and provincial institutions, created districts in Northern Ontario, and fought to ensure that those parts of Northwestern Ontario not historically part of Upper Canada (the vast areas north and west of the Lake Superior-Hudson Bay watershed, known as the District of Keewatin) would become part of Ontario, a victory embodied in the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889.^ Ontario was once known as "Upper Canada."
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It is on the northern coast of Lake Superior.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Since Federation Upper Canada has been known as the province of Ontario.

.He also presided over the emergence of the province into the economic powerhouse of Canada.^ When the Dominion of Canada was created in 1867, the region was split into the separate provinces of Ontario and Québec.

Mowat was the creator of what is often called Empire Ontario.
.Beginning with Sir John A. Macdonald's National Policy (1879) and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (1875-1885) through Northern Ontario and the Canadian Prairies to British Columbia, Ontario manufacturing and industry flourished.^ Gradually, however, areas of good soil were opened up, in the Rainy river valley, near Lake Temiscaming and elsewhere, and mines of various kinds were discovered, as the Canadian Pacific railway and its branches extended through the region, and at length the finding of very rich silver mines attracted world-wide attention to northern Ontario.

^ Automobiles are Ontario's major manufacturing industry and are its most important export.

^ The finances of the province have been well administered, and only in recent years has a debt been incurred, chiefly owing to the construction of a provincial railway to aid in the development of the northern districts.

.However, population increase slowed after a large recession hit the province in 1893, thus slowing growth drastically but only for a few short years.^ This emigration accounts in large measure for the slow increase of the population, though there has also been a slight decrease in the birth-rate.

^ The finances of the province have been well administered, and only in recent years has a debt been incurred, chiefly owing to the construction of a provincial railway to aid in the development of the northern districts.

^ Ontario is thus pre-eminently an agricultural province, though the growth of manufactures has increased the importance of the towns and cities, and many of the farmers are seeking new homes in the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan .

.Many newly arrived immigrants and others moved west along the railroad to the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia.^ Québec is the leading province of origin for people entering Ontario from other provinces; British Columbia is the principal destination for Ontarians leaving to live elsewhere in Canada.

.Mineral exploitation accelerated in the late 19th century, leading to the rise of important mining centres in the northeast like Sudbury, Cobalt and Timmins.^ Among the less important metals and minerals which are also mined, is corundum of especial purity.

^ Did you know that farm programs with Canada's minimum-security penal institutions extends back to the late 19th century!
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

.The province harnessed its water power to generate hydro-electric power and created the state-controlled Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, later Ontario Hydro.^ Electrical power in Ontario is relatively inexpensive.

^ The former Ontario Hydro was broken up into successor companies, including Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and Hydro One.

^ Power from the falls is put to use in New York state and Ontario, a large amount being sent to Toronto 80 m.

The availability of cheap electric power further facilitated the development of industry. .The Ford Motor Company of Canada was established in 1904. General Motors of Canada Ltd.^ Ford Motor Company Expands Collaboration with INRIX on Traffic and Routing (2010-01-07) .
  • Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop – Daily Commercial News 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dcnonl.com [Source type: News]

^ In the space of three years between 1903 and 1906, the Ford Motor Company started to manufacture Cargo ship unloading grain in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

was formed in .1918. The motor vehicle industry would go on to become the most lucrative industry for the Ontario economy.^ In 2003, Ontario had 6,957,174 registered motor vehicles, 28,179 registered buses, 112,567 registered motorcycles and mopeds, and 1,677,810 registered trailers.

^ Automobiles are Ontario's major manufacturing industry and are its most important export.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

.In July 1912, the Conservative government of Sir James P. Whitney issued Regulation 17 which severely limited the availability of French-language schooling to the province's French-speaking minority.^ English is the only official language, but Ontario's French speakers play an essential part in the province's cultural life and are the largest language minority The provincial government provides services in French in the regions where the French-speaking population is sufficiently high.

French-Canadians reacted with outrage, journalist Henri Bourassa denouncing the "Prussians of Ontario". It was eventually repealed in 1927.
.Influenced by events in the United States, the government of Sir William Hearst introduced prohibition of alcoholic drinks in 1916 with the passing of the Ontario Temperance Act.^ The United States is Ontario's major export market (93.4 percent of all exports) and major import supplier (72.5 percent of all imports).

^ At Guelph is the Ontario Agricultural College, founded and endowed by the provincial government, and greatly enlarged and improved by the generosity of Sir William Macdonald (b.

^ Ontario has more than 500 public golf courses; the only Professional Golf Association (PGA) Tour event outside the United States is held near Toronto.

.However, residents could distil and retain their own personal supply, and liquor producers could continue distillation and export for sale, which allowed Ontario to become a hotbed for the illegal smuggling of liquor into the United States, which was under complete prohibition.^ With the completion of the St. Lawrence Seaway five years later, ocean-going ships were allowed access to southern and western Ontario through the Great Lakes.

^ The United States is Ontario's major export market (93.4 percent of all exports) and major import supplier (72.5 percent of all imports).

^ In 1996, the Ontario government deregulated foreign student tuition, allowing schools to set their own fees.

Prohibition came to an end in 1927 with the establishment of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario by the government of George Howard Ferguson. .The sale and consumption of liquor, wine, and beer are still controlled by some of the most extreme laws in North America to ensure that strict community standards and revenue generation from the alcohol retail monopoly are upheld.^ The program is also the most ambitious program of its kind in North America and the largest goal of any jurisdiction, anywhere.
  • Media Advisory - Trees Ontario puts out call to landowners to learn how to plant trees - Local planting partners hosting free tree planting workshop – Daily Commercial News 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.dcnonl.com [Source type: News]

^ It is the second most important vehicle producing region in North America after Michigan.

.In April 2007, Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament Kim Craitor suggested that local brewers should be able to sell their beer in local corner stores; however, the motion was quickly rejected by Premier Dalton McGuinty.^ (He was replaced as premier by Dalton McGuinty.

^ I create and begin incorporating it into the artwork right from the start however pursuant to canada provincial integrated student loan place in ontario should be lifted and that individual institutions should be free to set .
  • Loan Release Forms Free Ontario Canada - Mortgage Above My Pay Grade 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.westga.edu [Source type: General]

^ In 2000/01, however, per capita provincial spending on the arts in Ontario was C $45, the lowest amount among the provinces and territories.

.The post-World War II period was one of exceptional prosperity and growth.^ World War II (1939–1945) brought both the United States and Canada out of the depths of the Depression.

.Ontario, and the Greater Toronto Area in particular, have been the recipients of most immigration to Canada, largely immigrants from war-torn Europe in the 1950s and 1960s and after changes in federal immigration law, a massive influx of non-Europeans since the 1970s.^ K Consulting York, Toronto, Ontario, Canada We are a full service recruitment firm specializing in ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ Woori Education Toronto, Ontario, Canada We are a recruitment agency with offices all across Canada ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ Bevertec CST Toronto, Ontario, Canada Bevertec is a world leader in IT consulting and open ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.From a largely ethnically British province, Ontario has rapidly become very culturally diverse.^ Ontario's proximity to key US markets puts the province's products less than a day's drive away from a large portion of American consumers.

^ The new province of Ontario developed slowly until the launch of large-scale industry in the early 1900s.

^ Québec is the leading province of origin for people entering Ontario from other provinces; British Columbia is the principal destination for Ontarians leaving to live elsewhere in Canada.

.The nationalist movement in Quebec, particularly after the election of the Parti Québécois in 1976, contributed to driving many businesses and English-speaking people out of Quebec to Ontario, and as a result Toronto surpassed Montreal as the largest city and economic centre of Canada.^ Toronto, Ontario's capital and Canada's largest city, had a population of 4.37 million in 2001.

^ Toronto is the largest city in Ontario as well as Canada.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Southern Ontario is an important farming and industrial region and is the centre of Canada’s population and urban development.
  • Ontario (province, Canada) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Depressed economic conditions in the Maritime Provinces have also resulted in de-population of those provinces in the 20th century, with heavy migration into Ontario.^ The Canadian Shield and the Hudson Bay Lowlands cover 90 percent of the province's territory, but are home to only 10 percent of Ontario's population.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

^ There are more "fun facts" about Ontario than any other Canadian Province except for Labrador, but it is hard to compete with those cute dogs.
  • Ontario - Wikiality, the Truthiness Encyclopedia 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC wikiality.wikia.com [Source type: Original source]

Ontario has no official language, but English is considered the de facto language. .Numerous French language services are available under the French Language Services Act of 1990 in designated areas where sizable francophone populations exist.^ The population is chiefly of British descent, though in the eastern counties numerous French Canadians are flocking in from Quebec and in some instances by purchase of farms replacing the British.

Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Ontario

Population since 1851

Year Population Five-year
% change
Ten-year
% change
Rank among
provinces
1851 952,004 n/a 208.8 1
1861 1,396,091 n/a 46.6 1
1871 1,620,851 n/a 16.1 1
1881 1,926,922 n/a 18.9 1
1891 2,114,321 n/a 9.7 1
1901 2,182,947 n/a 3.2 1
1911 2,527,292 n/a 15.8 1
1921 2,933,662 n/a 16.1 1
1931 3,431,683 n/a 17.0 1
1941 3,787,655 n/a 10.3 1
1951 4,597,542 n/a 21.4 1
1956 5,404,933 17.6 n/a 1
1961 6,236,092 15.4 35.6 1
1966 6,960,870 11.6 28.8 1
1971 7,703,105 10.7 23.5 1
1976 8,264,465 7.3 18.7 1
1981 8,625,107 4.4 12.0 1
1986 9,101,695 5.5 10.1 1
1991 10,084,885 10.8 16.9 1
1996 10,753,573 6.6 18.1 1
2001 11,410,046 6.1 13.1 1
2006* 12,160,282 6.6 13.1 1
*2006 Census[4][18][19][20]

Ethnic groups

File:Visible Minorities of Ontario.png
Visible minorities of Ontario in 2001.
Ethnic Responses %
Total population 11,285,545 100
Canadian 3,350,275 29.7
English 2,711,485 24
Scottish 1,843,110 16.3
Irish 1,761,280 15.6
French 1,235,765 10.9
German 965,510 8.6
Italian 781,345 6.9
Chinese 518,550 4.6
Dutch (Netherlands) 436,035 3.9
East Indian 413,415 3.7
Polish 386,050 3.4
Ukrainian 290,925 2.6
North American Indian 248,940 2.2
Portuguese 248,265 2.2
Jewish 196,260 1.7
Jamaican 180,810 1.6
Filipino 165,025 1.5
Spanish (Latin America) 147,140 1.3
Welsh 142,740 1.3
Hungarian (Magyar) 128,575 1.1
Greek 120,635 1.0
Russian 106,710 0.9
American (USA) 86,855 0.8
Serbian 78,230 0.7
British, not included
elsewhere
76,415 0.7
Vietnamese 67,450 0.6
Finnish 64,105 0.6
Croatian 62,325 0.6
Métis 60,535 0.5
Lebanese 59,155 0.5
.The percentages add to more than 100% because of dual responses (e.g.^ More than 100 professional companies perform plays, cabaret, opera, and dance in Toronto.

"French-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "French" and the category "Canadian"). Groups with greater than 200,000 responses are included. .The majority of Ontarians are of British (English, Scottish, Welsh) and Irish ancestry.^ From 1779 on, waves of English, Scottish, and Irish immigrants followed one another, moving up the St. Lawrence and populating the country.

.The vast majority of Ontarians are of British or other European descent.^ Québec is the leading province of origin for people entering Ontario from other provinces; British Columbia is the principal destination for Ontarians leaving to live elsewhere in Canada.

.Slightly less than five percent of the population of Ontario is Franco-Ontarian, that is those whose native tongue is French, although those with French ancestry account for 11% of the population.^ Ontario's proximity to key US markets puts the province's products less than a day's drive away from a large portion of American consumers.

^ In 2001, English was the mother tongue of 70.6 percent of Ontario's residents, while French was the primary language of 4.3 percent of Ontarians and 23.7 percent had other first languages (1.4 percent had two or more native languages).

^ In 2002, Ontario had 143.3 million acres (58 million hectares) of forest land, of which provincial ownership accounted for 88 percent; private lands, 11 percent; and federal areas, 1 percent.

.In relation to natural increase or inter-provincial migration, immigration is a huge population growth force in Ontario, as it has been over the last two centuries.^ In the last petroleum , natural gas , salt and gypsum are obtained, but elsewhere in southern Ontario no economic minerals except building materials are obtained.

^ As Canada's most populous province, Ontario is both the primary origin and primary destination for internal migration.

More recent sources of immigrants with already large or growing communities in Ontario include Caribbeans (Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Guyanese), South Asians (e.g. Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and Sri Lankans), East Asians (mostly Chinese and Filipinos), Central/South Americans (such as Colombians, Mexicans, Hondurans, Argentinans, and Ecuadorians), Eastern Europeans such as Russians and Bosnians, and groups from Somalia, Iran, and West Africa. .Most populations have settled in the Greater Toronto area.^ Transmission to others subsequently led to an outbreak among 257 people in the greater Toronto area.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

^ Greater Toronto Area (GTA) Locals / Branches GTA Committees .
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

.A smaller number have settled in other cities such as London, Kitchener, Hamilton, Windsor, Barrie, and Ottawa.^ Other cities and their 2001 populations include: Hamilton 618,820; Kitchener, 387,319; London, 337,318; St. Catharines–Niagara, 299,935; Windsor, 263,204; Oshawa, 234,779; Barrie, 129,963; and Kingston, 108,158.

^ Canals of Greenwich 88 Longitude West important cities are Ottawa (the capital of the Dominion) (59,9 28 in 1 9 01), Hamilton (52,634), London (37,981), Kingston (17,961).

^ Toronto Singles Montreal Singles Calgary Singles Ottawa Singles Winnipeg Singles Edmonton Singles Mississauga Singles Vancouver Singles Quebec City Singles Hamilton Singles Halifax Singles Longueuil Singles Surrey Singles Laval Singles London Singles .
  • Match.com: ontario singles, ontario dating, ontario personals 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC uk.match.com [Source type: General]

Religion

.The largest denominations by number of adherents according to the 2001 census were the Roman Catholic Church with 3,866,350 (34 %); the United Church of Canada with 1,334,570 (12 %); and the Anglican Church of Canada with 985,110 (9 %).^ About 35 percent of the population, or approximately 3,935,745 people, are Protestant, the majority of whom are members of the United Church of Canada or Anglicans, but there are significant numbers of Presbyterians, Baptists, Lutherans, and Pentecostals.

^ Although many Roman Catholic children attend the public schools, the number of separate schools is, under the influence of the priesthood, steadily increasing.

^ The Methodists are, numerically, the strongest religious body, then come Presbyterians, Roman Catholics and Anglicans, in the order named.

[23]
The major religious groups in Ontario, as of 2001, are:[24]
File:Religion in Ontario.png
Religion in Ontario in 2001.[22]
Religion People %
Total 11,285,535 100
Protestant 3,935,745 34.9
Catholic 3,911,760 34.7
No Religion 1,841,290 16.3
Muslim 352,530 3.1
Other Christians 301,935 2.7
Christian Orthodox 264,055 2.3
Hindu 217,555 1.9
Jewish 190,795 1.7
Buddhist 128,320 1.1
Sikh 104,785 0.9
Eastern Religions 17,780 0.2
Other Religions 18,985 0.2

Economy

File:OneLondonPlace.JPG
One London Place, in London, Ontario, is the tallest office tower in Ontario outside of the Greater Toronto Area.
File:Toronto's CN Tower.jpg
The CN Tower in Toronto has the highest public observation level on Earth.
File:Theabsolute.jpg
Absolute World will be the tallest building outside of Toronto when it is completed in 2009 in Mississauga.
Main article: Economy of Ontario
.Ontario's rivers, including its share of the Niagara River, make it rich in hydroelectric energy.^ Niagara river into Lake Ontario, which is only 247 ft.

[26] .Since the privatization of Ontario Hydro which began in 1999, Ontario Power Generation runs 85% of electricity generated in the province, of which 41% is nuclear, 30% is hydroelectric and 29% is fossil fuel derived.^ Electrical power in Ontario is relatively inexpensive.

^ The former Ontario Hydro was broken up into successor companies, including Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and Hydro One.

^ As of 2004, nuclear power represented almost half of Ontario's electricity output.

.OPG is not however responsible for the transmission of power, which is under the control of Hydro One.^ The former Ontario Hydro was broken up into successor companies, including Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and Hydro One.

.Despite its diverse range of power options, problems related to increasing consumption, lack of energy efficiency and aging nuclear reactors, Ontario has been forced in recent years to purchase power from its neighbours Quebec and Michigan to supplement its power needs during peak consumption periods.^ As of 2004, nuclear power represented almost half of Ontario's electricity output.

^ This year PSAC Ontario is sponsoring Labour Day related activities in 16 different communities.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ Ontario's first immigrants arrived about 10,000 years ago, during the last ice age.

.An abundance of natural resources, excellent transportation links to the American heartland and the inland Great Lakes making ocean access possible via ship containers, have all contributed to making manufacturing the principal industry, found mainly in the Golden Horseshoe region, which is the largest industrialized area in Canada.^ Leading manufacturing industries are transportation equipment, food products, chemicals and chemical products, electrical and electronic products, fabricated metal products, and primary metal products.

^ This area was populated by a large number of Loyalists (American colonists who had sided with Great Britain) after the American Revolution.

^ Hopefully this is a sign of there recovery in the Southern Ontario and Great Lakes region.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

.Important products include motor vehicles, iron, steel, food, electrical appliances, machinery, chemicals, and paper.^ Leading manufacturing industries are transportation equipment, food products, chemicals and chemical products, electrical and electronic products, fabricated metal products, and primary metal products.

Ontario surpassed Michigan in car production, assembling 2.696 million vehicles in 2004.
However, as a result of steeply declining sales, on November 21, 2005, General Motors announced massive layoffs at production facilities across North America including two large GM plants in Oshawa and a drive train facility in St. Catharines which by 2008 will result in 8,000 job losses in Ontario alone. Subsequently in January 23, 2006, Ford Motor Company announced between 25,000 and 30,000 layoffs phased until 2012; Ontario was spared the worst, but job losses were announced for the St. Thomas facility and the Windsor casting plant. However, these losses will be offset by Ford's recent announcement of a hybrid vehicle facility slated to begin production in 2007 at its Oakville plant and GM's re-introduction of the Camaro which will be produced in Oshawa. Toyota also announced plans to build a new plant in Woodstock by 2008, and Honda also has plans to add an engine plant at its facility in Alliston.
File:Toronto Downtown Core at Night.jpg
Toronto: Ontario's capital city and Canada's largest metropolis.
.Toronto, the capital of Ontario, is the centre of Canada's financial services and banking industry.^ Toronto, Ontario, Canada We are a full service recruitment firm with a solid ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ Professional Service Plus Toronto, Ontario, Canada Professional Services Plus has a wealth of knowledge in ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

^ K Consulting York, Toronto, Ontario, Canada We are a full service recruitment firm specializing in ...
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

.Suburban cities in the Greater Toronto Area like Brampton, Mississauga and Vaughan are large product distribution and IT centres, in addition to having various manufacturing industries.^ Leading manufacturing industries are transportation equipment, food products, chemicals and chemical products, electrical and electronic products, fabricated metal products, and primary metal products.

^ Greetings Sisters and Brothers: The PSAC Ontario Region will be holding an Aboriginal Educational Session on December 9th and 10th, 2009 at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto open to members who self-identify as Aboriginal in the Greater Toronto Area.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ If you are, or will be in the Toronto area and would like to attend, please consider doing so.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

The information technology sector is also important, particularly in Markham, Waterloo and Ottawa. .Hamilton is the largest steel manufacturing city in Canada, and Sarnia is the centre for petrochemical production.^ Toronto, Ontario's capital and Canada's largest city, had a population of 4.37 million in 2001.

^ With a population of about 4 million, Toronto is Canada's largest city and headquarters for many Canadian corporations.

.Construction employs at least 7% of the work force, but because of undocumented workers, the figure is likely over 10%.^ Manufacturing employs about 20 percent of the total work force.

.This sector has thrived over the last ten years because of steadily increasing new house and condominium construction combined with low mortgage rates and climbing prices, particularly in the Greater Toronto area.^ Transmission to others subsequently led to an outbreak among 257 people in the greater Toronto area.

^ Farmers organized the powerful United Farmers Movement in Ontario to protest low farm product prices and high transportation rates.

^ Greater Toronto Area (GTA) Locals / Branches GTA Committees .
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

.Mining and the forest products industry, notably pulp and paper, are vital to the economy of Northern Ontario.^ In 2002, Ontario exported C $9.3 billion in forestry products, mainly paper and paperboard, news-print, wood pulp, and softwood lumber.

^ There are over 2,400 logging, wood processing, and paper manufacturing establishments in the province—many Ontario towns have at least one industry connected to forestry.

^ All of Canada suffered greatly, and in Ontario, the pulp and paper industry in the North was particularly hard hit.

.More than any other region, tourism contributes heavily to the economy of Central Ontario, peaking during the summer months owing to the abundance of fresh water recreation and wilderness found there in reasonable proximity to the major urban centres.^ Tourism is an important sector of the Ontario economy.

^ There are more than 50 public libraries focusing on the province's First Nations (native people, including Métis, and Inuits).

^ Other than seeing Eagles in BC and Nova Scotia while on vacation it has been at least 10 years since I've seen one in Southern Ontario.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

At other times of the year, hunting, skiing and snowmobiling are popular. This region has some of the most vibrant fall colour displays anywhere on the continent, and tours directed at overseas visitors are organized to see them. .Tourism also plays a key role in border cities with large casinos, among them Windsor, Rama, and Niagara Falls, which attract many U.S. visitors.^ In the 1890s, Canada began large-scale development of its hydroelectric potential, with generators and transmission lines constructed at Niagara Falls, Ontario.

^ As cities expanded, farmland—especially between Toronto and Niagara Falls—began to disappear.

[27]

Agriculture

.Once the dominant industry, agriculture occupies a small percentage of the population.^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

The number of farms has decreased from 68,633 in 1991 to 59,728 in 2001, but farms have increased in average size, and many are becoming more mechanized. .Cattle, small grains and dairy were the common types of farms in the 2001 census.^ The livestock population in 2001 included 2.14 million head of cattle, 363,544 dairy cows, 3.46 million pigs, and 337,625 sheep.

The fruit, grape and vegetable growing industry is located primarily on the Niagara Peninsula and along Lake Erie, where tobacco farms are also situated. Tobacco production has decreased leading to an increase in some other new crop alternatives gaining popularity, such as hazelnuts and ginseng. .The Ontario origins of Massey-Ferguson Ltd., once one of the largest farm implement manufacturers in the world, indicate the importance agriculture once had to the Canadian economy.^ Beginning in the 1880s, industrial corporations in Ontario became larger, and farming was no longer the province's largest sector of employment.

^ Experimental farm in Ottawa Ontario Canada I witnessed a Bald Eagle catch a rabbit and then was swarmed by crows until he landed in one of the fields to protect its catch.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

.Southern Ontario's limited supply of agricultural land is going out of production at an increasing rate.^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

^ With the completion of the St. Lawrence Seaway five years later, ocean-going ships were allowed access to southern and western Ontario through the Great Lakes.

^ Farmers organized the powerful United Farmers Movement in Ontario to protest low farm product prices and high transportation rates.

.Urban sprawl and farmland severances contribute to the loss of thousands of acres of productive agricultural land in Ontario each year.^ That year, the total land area of farms in Ontario was 13.5 million acres (5.5 million hectares), of which 9.04 million acres (3.7 million hectares) were under crops.

^ In 2002, Ontario had 143.3 million acres (58 million hectares) of forest land, of which provincial ownership accounted for 88 percent; private lands, 11 percent; and federal areas, 1 percent.

^ Here is where most of Ontario's population can be found; it is also the area with the most of province's industry, commerce, and agricultural lands.

Over 2,000 farms and 150,000 acres (610 km2) of farmland in the GTA alone were lost to production in the two decades between 1976 and 1996. This loss represented approximately 18% of Ontario's Class 1 farmland being converted to urban purposes. In addition, increasing rural severances provide ever-greater interference with agricultural production.

Transportation

File:ON 1996.jpg
Current Ontario licence plate
Historically, the province has used two major east-west routes, both starting from Montreal in the neighbouring province of Quebec. .The northerly route, which was pioneered by early French-speaking fur traders, travels northwest from Montreal along the Ottawa River, then continues westward towards Manitoba.^ I was driving into work today along the Ottawa river parkway (west bound) and spotted a group of bird on the river to my right.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

Major cities on or near the route include Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, and Thunder Bay. The much more heavily travelled southerly route, which was driven by growth in predominantly English-speaking settlements originated by the United Empire Loyalists and later other European immigrants, travels southwest from Montreal along the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, and Lake Erie before entering the United States in Michigan. .Major cities on or near the route include Kingston, Oshawa, Toronto, Mississauga, Kitchener/Waterloo, London, Sarnia, and Windsor.^ Other cities and their 2001 populations include: Hamilton 618,820; Kitchener, 387,319; London, 337,318; St. Catharines–Niagara, 299,935; Windsor, 263,204; Oshawa, 234,779; Barrie, 129,963; and Kingston, 108,158.

^ Other universities in Ontario (with location and year founded) include York University (North York, 1959); University of Western Ontario (London, 1878); University of Waterloo (1957); University of Guelph (1964); University of Ottawa (1848); Carleton University (Ottawa, 1942); Queen's University (Kingston, 1841); McMaster University (Hamilton, 1887); Ryerson Polytechnical Institute (Toronto, 1948); University of Windsor (1857); Brock University (St.

^ Toronto Singles Montreal Singles Calgary Singles Ottawa Singles Winnipeg Singles Edmonton Singles Mississauga Singles Vancouver Singles Quebec City Singles Hamilton Singles Halifax Singles Longueuil Singles Surrey Singles Laval Singles London Singles .
  • Match.com: ontario singles, ontario dating, ontario personals 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC uk.match.com [Source type: General]

.Most of Ontario's major transportation infrastructure is oriented east-west and roughly follows one of these two original routes.^ Automobiles are Ontario's major manufacturing industry and are its most important export.

^ As Canada's most populous province, Ontario is both the primary origin and primary destination for internal migration.

^ We were so excited watching both of them when suddenly another one soared from above and came down to these two.
  • Eagle Viewing Directory - Ontario, Canada 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC baldeagleinfo.com [Source type: General]

Roads

Main article: Roads in Ontario
File:401atDVP.jpg
.Highway 401, running 817.9 km east/northeast from Windsor to the Quebec border is one of the busiest highways in the world.^ Highway 401, which stretches across southern Ontario, opened in 1968 and quickly became one of the busiest highways in Canada.

^ Windsor Personnel Windsor, Ontario, Canada CareerNET LLC Ontario, Canada Exeutive Search Firm CORPX Windsor, Ontario, Canada We help the world communicate, one hire at a time.
  • Directory of Recruiters in Ontario, Canada - My Canada Jobs 25 September 2009 7:07 UTC www.mycanadajobs.com [Source type: News]

[28][29]
.400-Series Highways make up the primary vehicular network in the south of province, and they connect to numerous border crossings with the U.S., the busiest being the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel and Ambassador Bridge (via Highway 401) and the Blue Water Bridge (via Highway 402).^ Highway 401, which stretches across southern Ontario, opened in 1968 and quickly became one of the busiest highways in Canada.

^ There are over 2,400 logging, wood processing, and paper manufacturing establishments in the province—many Ontario towns have at least one industry connected to forestry.

.The primary highway along the southern route is Highway 401, the busiest highway in North America[28][29] and the backbone of Ontario's road network, tourism, and economy,[28][29] while the primary highway across the northern route is Highway 417 /Highway 17, part of the Trans-Canada Highway.^ Highway 401, which stretches across southern Ontario, opened in 1968 and quickly became one of the busiest highways in Canada.

^ Tourism is an important sector of the Ontario economy.

^ Ontario produces every sixth vehicle built in North America per year.

.Highway 400/Highway 69 connects Toronto to Northern Ontario.^ There are over 2,400 logging, wood processing, and paper manufacturing establishments in the province—many Ontario towns have at least one industry connected to forestry.

Other provincial highways and regional roads inter-connect the remainder of the province.

Waterways

The St. Lawrence Seaway, which extends across most of the southern portion of the province and connects to the Atlantic Ocean, is the primary water transportation route for cargo, particularly iron ore and grain. In the past, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River were also a major passenger transportation route, but over the past half century they have been nearly totally supplanted by vehicle, rail, and air travel. There was previously a ferry connecting Toronto with Rochester, New York.

Railways

File:Otrain.jpg
The O-Train, Ottawa's light rail train system (LRT).
.Via Rail operates the inter-regional passenger train service on the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor, along with "The Canadian", a transcontinental rail service from Toronto to Vancouver.^ The provincial government operates the GO (Government of Ontario) commuter train service, connecting Toronto to Richmand Hill, Georgetown, and Bradford in the north; to Whitby in the east; and to Hamilton in the west.

^ To that end, the Canadian Labour Congress, the Toronto and York Region Labour Council and the Good Jobs For All Coalition will hold a series of EI lobby training sessions next week for community and labour activists.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ Toronto Transit operates the subway system, with streetcar and bus service available as well.

.Additionally, Amtrak rail connects Ontario with key New York cities including Buffalo, Albany, and New York City.^ Match.com's online dating sites and affiliated businesses span thousands of cities, including your city in ontario.
  • Match.com: ontario singles, ontario dating, ontario personals 11 September 2009 9:09 UTC uk.match.com [Source type: General]

.Ontario Northland provides rail service to destinations as far north as Moosonee near James Bay, connecting them with the south.^ The provincial government operates the GO (Government of Ontario) commuter train service, connecting Toronto to Richmand Hill, Georgetown, and Bradford in the north; to Whitby in the east; and to Hamilton in the west.

^ Polar bears live in the far north along Hudson Bay.

Freight rail is dominated by the founding cross-country Canadian National Railway and CP Rail companies, which during the 1990s sold many short rail lines from their vast network to private companies operating mostly in the south.
.Regional commuter rail is limited to the provincially owned GO Transit, which serves a train/bus network spanning the Golden Horseshoe region, with its hub in Toronto.^ The provincial government operates the GO (Government of Ontario) commuter train service, connecting Toronto to Richmand Hill, Georgetown, and Bradford in the north; to Whitby in the east; and to Hamilton in the west.

^ Toronto Transit operates the subway system, with streetcar and bus service available as well.

.The Toronto Transit Commission operates the province's only subway and streetcar system, one of the busiest in North America.^ Toronto Transit operates the subway system, with streetcar and bus service available as well.

^ Ontario was one of only four provinces or territories that had an increase in the number of live births in 2001.

^ Toronto also boasts North America's largest film festival which is held each year in September.

Outside of Toronto, the O-Train Light rail line operates in Ottawa with expansion of the line and proposals for additional lines.

Air travel

.Lester B. Pearson International Airport is the nation's busiest and the world's 29th busiest, handling over 30 million passengers per year.^ International air service is available from Ottawa as well as Pearson International Airport in Toronto.

.Other important airports include Ottawa International Airport and Hamilton's John C. Munro International Airport, which is an important courier and freight aviation centre.^ International air service is available from Ottawa as well as Pearson International Airport in Toronto.

.Toronto/Pearson and Ottawa/Macdonald-Cartier form two of the three points in Air Canada's Rapidair triangle, Canada's busiest set of air routes (the third point is Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport).^ International air service is available from Ottawa as well as Pearson International Airport in Toronto.

^ Ontario has two teams in the National Hockey League (NHL): the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Ottawa Senators.

^ Pearson is a hub for Air Canada, and is one of the biggest international aviation facilities in Canada.

WestJet also operates many flights in the triangle. A third and new airline, Porter Airlines recently made Toronto City Centre Airport their hub.
.Most Ontario cities have regional airports, many of which have scheduled commuter flights from Air Canada Jazz or smaller airlines and charter companies—flights from the larger cities such as Thunder Bay, Sault Ste.^ I would like to take this opportunity to invite you to observe the upcoming PSAC Ontario Council meeting, scheduled for March 7 & 8, 2009 at the PSAC Regional Office Boardroom......
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ The PSAC Ontario’s First Directly Chartered Local (DCL) Conference was held in Toronto from October 22 to 25, with representation from 13 DCL’s from across the Ontario Region.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ Gerry Halabecki Regional Executive Vice-President Ontario Public Service Alliance of Canada .
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

Marie, Sudbury, North Bay, Timmins, Windsor, London, and Kingston feed directly into Toronto Pearson. .Bearskin Airlines also runs flights along the northerly east-west route, connecting Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste.^ The provincial government operates the GO (Government of Ontario) commuter train service, connecting Toronto to Richmand Hill, Georgetown, and Bradford in the north; to Whitby in the east; and to Hamilton in the west.

^ Polar bears live in the far north along Hudson Bay.

Marie, and Thunder Bay directly without requiring connections at Toronto Pearson.
.Isolated towns and settlements in the northern areas of the province rely partly or entirely on air service for travel, goods, and even ambulance services, since much of the far northern area of the province cannot be reached by road or rail.^ Woodland caribou, moose, muskrats, beavers, eagles, and wolves inhabit the northern reaches of the province.

^ Northern Ontario's towns were built because of the railway, and today rails and roads carry the products of the mines and mills southward.

Government

File:Ontario2007.gif
The wordmark of the Government of Ontario, featuring a stylized version of the provincial flower, the trillium. This wordmark was introduced in late 2007.
File:Ontario-wordmark.svg
The previous wordmark of the Government of Ontario, which was in use from the late-1960s until 2007 (not counting the lettering used here).
File:Ontario Legislative Assembly, Toronto, May 2006.jpg
The Ontario Legislature at Queen's Park.
The British North America Act 1867 section 69 stipulated "There shall be a Legislature for Ontario consisting of the Lieutenant Governor and of One House, styled the Legislative Assembly of Ontario." The assembly has 107 seats representing ridings elected in a first-past-the-post system across the province. The legislative buildings at Queen's Park in Toronto are the seat of government. .Following the Westminster system, the leader of the party holding the most seats in the assembly is known as the "Premier and President of the Council" (Executive Council Act R.S.O. 1990).^ For example, the provincial premier, as the majority party leader of the legislature, functions much like the Canadian prime minister.

^ The parties held the following number of seats in Ontario's Legislative Assembly: Progressive Conservative Party, 24; Liberal Party, 72; and New Democratic Party, 7.

^ Regional Executive Vice-President, Ontario Re: PSAC Ontario Council Meetings .
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

The Premier chooses the cabinet or Executive Council whose members are deemed "ministers of the Crown." .Although the Legislative Assembly Act (R.S.O. 1990) refers to members of the assembly, the legislators are now commonly called MPPs (Members of the Provincial Parliament) in English and députés de l'Assemblée législative in French, but they have also been called MLAs (Members of the Legislative Assembly), and both are acceptable.^ They do so as members of the 103-seat Legislative Assembly.

^ Provincial legislators, like their federal counterparts in Parliament, are elected to represent a constitutional jurisdiction and pass legislation.

^ Finally in 1990, the NDP won control of the Legislative Assembly.

.The title of Prime Minister of Ontario, while permissible in English and correct in French (le Premier ministre), is generally avoided in favour of "Premier" to avoid confusion with the Prime Minister of Canada.^ In 2001, English was the mother tongue of 70.6 percent of Ontario's residents, while French was the primary language of 4.3 percent of Ontarians and 23.7 percent had other first languages (1.4 percent had two or more native languages).

^ Ontarians Sir John A. Macdonald (b.Scotland, 1815–91) and Alexander Mackenzie (b.Scotland, 1822–92) served as Canada's first and second prime ministers, respectively.

^ For example, the provincial premier, as the majority party leader of the legislature, functions much like the Canadian prime minister.

Further information: Monarchy in OntarioImage:Wp_globe_tiny.gif and Executive Council of OntarioImage:Wp_globe_tiny.gif

Politics

Main article: Politics of Ontario
.Ontario has traditionally operated under a three-party system.^ By 1995, the Progressive Conservative Party had returned to power in Ontario under the leadership of Mike Harris.

.In the last few decades the liberal Ontario Liberal Party, conservative Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, and social-democratic Ontario New Democratic Party have all ruled the province at different times.^ Shauna in Brampton, Ontario said: Hi, To all you new RDH's how is the job hunt going?
  • Dental Hygienist Jobs Forum - DH license from Ontario to BC | Indeed.com 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC www.indeed.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Ontario is currently under a Liberal government headed by Premier Dalton McGuinty.^ (He was replaced as premier by Dalton McGuinty.

The present government, first elected in 2003, was re-elected on 10 October, 2007.
.Federally, Ontario is known as being the province that offers the strongest support for the Liberal Party of Canada.^ Greetings Sisters & Brothers, The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) currently has a "Drive to Work" province wide campaign underway.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ The parties held the following number of seats in Ontario's Legislative Assembly: Progressive Conservative Party, 24; Liberal Party, 72; and New Democratic Party, 7.

^ As Canada's most populous province, Ontario is both the primary origin and primary destination for internal migration.

.Currently, half of the party's 76 seats in the Canadian House of Commons represent Ontario ridings.^ As of 2004, nuclear power represented almost half of Ontario's electricity output.

^ The parties held the following number of seats in Ontario's Legislative Assembly: Progressive Conservative Party, 24; Liberal Party, 72; and New Democratic Party, 7.

.As the province has the most seats of any province in Canada, earning support from Ontario voters is considered a crucial matter for any party hoping to win a Canadian federal election.^ Greetings Sisters & Brothers, The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) currently has a "Drive to Work" province wide campaign underway.
  • What's New? :: PSAC Ontario 28 January 2010 0:36 UTC ontario.psac.com [Source type: General]

^ When the Dominion of Canada was created in 1867, the region was split into the separate provinces of Ontario and Québec.

^ Québec is the leading province of origin for people entering Ontario from other provinces; British Columbia is the principal destination for Ontarians leaving to live elsewhere in Canada.

Urban areas

Census Metropolitan Areas

See also: Golden Horseshoe and Windsor-Detroit
.Statistics Canada's measure of a "metro area", the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), roughly bundles together population figures from the core municipality with those from "commuter" municipalities.^ Ottawa, the bilingual, bicultural national capital, sits at the junction of the Gatineau, Rideau, and Ottawa Rivers; together with Hull, Québec, the metropolitan population in 2001 was 1.03 million.

^ Restructured municipalities have over 60 percent of Ontario's population and contain fewer but larger incorporated municipalities than those of the counties.

[30]
CMA (largest other included municipalities in brackets) 2006 2001
Toronto CMA (Region of Peel, Region of York, City of Pickering) 5,813,149 4,682,897
Ottawa–Gatineau CMA (Clarence-Rockland, Russell Township)* 1,130,761* 1,067,800*
Hamilton CMA (Burlington, Grimsby) 692,911 662,401
London CMA (St. Thomas, Strathroy-Caradoc) 457,720 435,600
Kitchener CMA (Cambridge, Waterloo) 451,235 414,284
St. Catharines–Niagara CMA (Niagara Falls, Welland) 390,317 377,009
Oshawa CMA (Whitby, Clarington) 330,594 296,298
Windsor CMA (Lakeshore, LaSalle) 323,342 307,877
Barrie CA (Innisfil, Springwater) 177,061 148,480
Sudbury CMA (Whitefish Lake & Wanapitei Reserves) 158,258 155,601
Kingston CMA 152,358 146,838
*Parts of .Quebec (including Gatineau) are included in the Ottawa CMA. The entire population of the Ottawa CMA, in both provinces, is shown.^ Ottawa, the bilingual, bicultural national capital, sits at the junction of the Gatineau, Rideau, and Ottawa Rivers; together with Hull, Québec, the metropolitan population in 2001 was 1.03 million.

^ As Canada's most populous province, Ontario is both the primary origin and primary destination for internal migration.

Clarence-Rockland and Russell Township are not the second and third largest municipalities in the entire CMA, they are the largest municipalities in the Ontario section of the CMA.

Municipalities

Ten largest municipalities by population[4]
Municipality 2006 2001 1996
Toronto (provincial capital) &&&&&&&&02503281.&&&&&02,503,281 &&&&&&&&02481494.&&&&&02,481,494 &&&&&&&&02385421.&&&&&02,385,421
Ottawa (national capital) &&&&&&&&&0812129.&&&&&0812,129 &&&&&&&&&0774072.&&&&&0774,072 &&&&&&&&&0721136.&&&&&0721,136
Mississauga (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0668549.&&&&&0668,549 &&&&&&&&&0612925.&&&&&0612,925 &&&&&&&&&0544382.&&&&&0544,382
Hamilton &&&&&&&&&0504559.&&&&&0504,559 &&&&&&&&&0490268.&&&&&0490,268 &&&&&&&&&0467799.&&&&&0467,799
Brampton (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0433806.&&&&&0433,806 &&&&&&&&&0325428.&&&&&0325,428 &&&&&&&&&0268251.&&&&&0268,251
London &&&&&&&&&0352395.&&&&&0352,395 &&&&&&&&&0336539.&&&&&0336,539 &&&&&&&&&0325669.&&&&&0325,669
Markham (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0261573.&&&&&0261,573 &&&&&&&&&0208615.&&&&&0208,615 &&&&&&&&&0173383.&&&&&0173,383
Vaughan (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0238866.&&&&&0238,866 &&&&&&&&&0182022.&&&&&0182,022 &&&&&&&&&0132549.&&&&&0132,549
Windsor &&&&&&&&&0216473.&&&&&0216,473 &&&&&&&&&0209218.&&&&&0209,218 &&&&&&&&&0197694.&&&&&0197,694
Kitchener &&&&&&&&&0204668.&&&&&0204,668 &&&&&&&&&0190399.&&&&&0190,399 &&&&&&&&&0178420.&&&&&0178,420

Songs and slogans

During the John Robarts government of the 1960s, the slogan "Is There Any Other Place You'd Rather Be?" was in use to promote tourism. During a blizzard early in 1971, highway travellers stranded at a Highway 401 service center, with Premier Robarts (in his last months of office), asked him the slogan in an ironic twist.
In 1967, in conjunction with the celebration of Canada's centennial, the song "A Place to Stand" was introduced at the inauguration of Ontario's pavilion at the Expo 67 World's Fair, and became the background for the province's advertising for decades.
In 1973 the first slogan to appear on licence plates in Ontario was "Keep It Beautiful". This was replaced by "Yours to Discover" in 1982,[31] apparently inspired by a tourism slogan, "Discover Ontario," dating back to 1927.[32] (From 1988 to 1990,[33] "Ontario Incredible"[34] gave "Yours to Discover" a brief respite.)
In 2007, a new song replaced "A Place to Stand" after four decades. "There's No Place Like This" (Un Endroit Sans Pareil) is featured in current television advertising, performed by Ontario artists including Molly Johnson, Brian Byrne, Tomi Swick (from Hamilton) and Keshia Chante (born in Ottawa).[35]

Famous Ontarians

The singer-songwriter, guitarist, and film director Neil Young was born in Toronto and spent part of his childhood in Omemee, a town he memorialized in his song "Helpless" (written for Young's band Crazy Horse but most famously recorded on the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young album Déjà Vu). The first lines of the song read, "There is a town in north Ontario / With dream comfort memory to spare / And in my mind I still need a place to go / All my changes were there."
Other famous artists originating from Ontario include actors Rachel McAdams(St. Thomas),Ryan Gosling (London), musician Avril Lavigne (Napanee), Rush (Toronto), Silverstein (Burlington), Protest the Hero (Whitby), Sum 41 (Ajax), Billy Talent (Mississauga), Our Lady Peace (Toronto), Alexisonfire (St. Catharines), The Tragically Hip, (Kingston), illScarlett (Mississauga), Three Days Grace (Toronto), singers Paul Anka, Keisha Chante, Matthew Perry, and Alanis Morissette (all from Ottawa), Gordon Lightfoot (Orillia), musician Shania Twain (Timmins), Blue Rodeo (Orono), comics Jim Carrey (Newmarket), John Candy (Toronto), Russell Peters (Brampton), Mike Myers (Toronto), former NHL star Steve Yzerman (Nepean), Tom Green (Pembroke), music band Barenaked Ladies, former WWE Diva Trish Stratus, and rapper Kardinal Offishall were all either raised or at one time resided in Scarborough, formerly an incorporated city which now makes up the eastern section of Toronto. Wayne Gretzky "The Great One" Former NHL star from Brantford

See also



  • Canada
  • Census divisions of Ontario
  • Coat of arms of Ontario
  • Eastern Ontario
  • Great Seal of Ontario
  • Flag of Ontario
  • Franco-Ontarian
  • Higher education in Ontario
  • Legislative Assembly of Ontario
  • Lieutenant-Governors of Ontario
  • List of airports in Ontario
  • List of botanical gardens in Canada
  • List of Canadian poets
  • List of Canadian provincial and territorial symbols
  • List of cities in Canada
  • List of colleges in Ontario
  • List of communities in Ontario
  • List of Ontario counties
  • List of Ontario premiers
  • List of Ontario-related topics
  • List of universities in Ontario
  • Monarchy in Ontario
  • Northern Ontario
  • Northwestern Ontario
  • Ontario Academic Credit
  • Ontario Association of Landscape Architects
  • Ontario Court of Appeal
  • Ontario Provincial Police
  • Ontario Superior Court of Justice
  • Order of Ontario
  • Professional sports teams of Ontario
  • Scouting in Ontario
  • Southern Ontario
  • Southwestern Ontario

Notes

  1. ^ Ontario is the largest province in the country by population. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  2. ^ Canada's provinces and territories total area, land area and water area.. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  3. ^ Toronto is Canada's largest metropolitan area. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  4. ^ a b c Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data. Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population (2007-03-13). Retrieved on 2007-03-13.
  5. ^ Mithun, Marianne (2000). The Languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  6. ^ About Canada // Ontario. Study Canada Last Paragraph-second last sentence. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. “Ontario's name is thought to come form the Iroquois word "Skanadario" which means "beautiful water"”
  7. ^ The British North American act of 1867. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  8. ^ Government of Ontario. Ontario Facts: Overview. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  9. ^ Early Districts and Counties 1788-1899. Archives of Ontario (2006-09-05). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  10. ^ Heidorn, Keith C. (2005-11-01). Lake Breeze Weather. The Weather Doctor. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  11. ^ About Ontario; History: Government of Ontario. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  12. ^ Étienne Brûlé's article on Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  13. ^ a b About Ontario; History; French and British Struggle for Domination. Government of Ontario. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  14. ^ The Treaty of Paris (1763). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  15. ^ The Quebec Act of 1774. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  16. ^ The Constitutional Act of 1791. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  17. ^ Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada
  18. ^ Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Ontario). Statistics Canada (2005-09-01). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  19. ^ Canada's population. The Daily. Statistics Canada (2006-09-27). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  20. ^ Selected Ethnic Origins1, for Canada, Provinces and Territories - 20% Sample Data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  21. ^ Statistics Canada Population by selected ethnic origins, by province and territory (2001 Census) (Ontario). Statistics Canada (2005-01-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  22. ^ a b Statistics Canada 2001 Community Profiles. Statistics Canada (2006-12-14). Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  23. ^ http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/highlight/Religion/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&View=1a&Code=35&Table=1&StartRec=1&Sort=2&B1=35&B2=All
  24. ^ Population by religion, by province and territory (2001 Census) (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan). Statistics Canada (2005-01-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  25. ^ |Religious diversity information for Ontario
  26. ^ Ontario is rich in hydroelectricity, especially areas near the Niagara River. Ontario Facts. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  27. ^ Ontario. Ministry of Economic Development and Trade. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  28. ^ a b c Ministry of Transportation (Ontario) (6 August 2002). Ontario government investing $401 million to upgrade Highway 401. Retrieved on 2006-12-20.
  29. ^ a b c Brian Gray (2004-04-10). GTA Economy Dinged by Every Crash on the 401 - North America's Busiest Freeway. Toronto Sun, transcribed at Urban Planet. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. “The "phenomenal" number of vehicles on Hwy. 401 as it cuts through Toronto makes it the busiest freeway in North America...”
  30. ^ Statistics Canada Population of census metropolitan areas (2001 Census boundaries) (number). Statistics Canada (2006-06-12). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  31. ^ Ontario
  32. ^ | Library | University of Waterloo
  33. ^ Official Ontario Road Maps Produced -1971 - 2006
  34. ^ Measuring the Returns to Tourism Advertising - Butterfield et al. 37 (1): 12 - Journal of Travel Research
  35. ^ There's more to discover in Ontario

References

Template:Sourcesstart
  • Michael Sletcher, 'Ottawa', in James Ciment, ed., Colonial America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History, (5 vols., M. E. Sharpe, New York, 2006).
  • Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada
Template:Sourcesend

External links

All wikimedia projects
Articles on this topic in other Wikimedia projects can be found at: [[{{{1}}}| Ontario]]
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This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Ontario. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 11, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Ontario, which are similar to those in the above article.








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