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Oscar Hijuelos
Born August 24, 1951
New York City
Occupation novelist
Nationality USA
Ethnicity Cuban American
Notable work(s) The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love
Notable award(s) Pulitzer

Oscar Hijuelos (born August 24, 1951) is an American novelist. He is the first Hispanic to win a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Hijuelos was born in New York City, in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, to Cuban immigrant parents. He attended the Corpus Christi School [1], public schools, and later attended Bronx Community College, Lehman College, and Manhattan Community College before matriculating into and studying writing at the City College of New York (B.A., 1975; M.A. in Creative Writing, 1976).[1] He then practiced various professions before taking up writing full time. His first novel, Our House in the Last World, was published in 1983 and received the 1985 Rome Prize, awarded by the American Academy in Rome. His second novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It was adapted for the film The Mambo Kings in 1992 and as a Broadway musical in 2005.

Hijuelos has taught at Hofstra University and is currently affiliated with Duke University, where he is a member of the faculty of the Department of English.[2]

Contents

Bibliography

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Major works

  • Our House in the Last World (1983)
  • The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love (1990)
  • The Fourteen Sisters of Emilio Montez O'Brien (1993)
  • Mr. Ives' Christmas (1995)
  • Empress of the Splendid Season (1999)
  • A Simple Habana Melody (from when the world was good) (2002)
  • Dark Dude (2008)

Contributions

  • Preface, Iguana Dreams: New Latino Fiction, edited by Delia Poey and Virgil Suarez. New York, HarperPerennial, 1992.
  • Introduction, Cool Salsa: Bilingual Poems on Growing up Latino in the United States, edited by Lori M. Carlson. New York, Holt, 1994.
  • Introduction, The Cuban American Family Album by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler. New York, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  • Contributor, Best of Pushcart Press III. Pushcart, 1978.
  • Contributor, You're On!: Seven Plans in English and Spanish, edited by Lori M. Carlson. New York, Morrow Junior Books, 1999.

Preceded by: Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler (1989 winner)

Pulitzer Prize Winners for Fiction

Succeeded by: Rabbit At Rest by John Updike (1991 winner)


Notes

  1. ^ a b Carlson, Lori M.; and Hijuelos, Oscar, Red Hot Salsa : Bilingual Poems on Being Young and Latino in the United States, Macmillan, 2005. ISBN 0805076166. Cf. Introduction, p.xvi. "Once, while in the fourth grade at Corpus Christi School, I received a Valentine's card that said 'I think you're cute'. ..."
  2. ^ http://fds.duke.edu/db/aas/English/faculty/oh8

See also

External links


Simple English

Oscar J. Hijuelos
File:Replace this image
Born August 24, 1951 (1951-08-24) (age 59)
New York City
Occupation novelist
Nationality USA
Ethnicity Cuban American
Notable work(s) The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love
Notable award(s) Pulitzer

Oscar J. Hijuelos (born August 24, 1951) is an American novelist. He is the first Hispanic to win a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.[1]

Contents

Early life and education

Hijuelos was born in New York City, in Morningside Heights, Manhattan. His parents were Cuban immigrants. He studied at the Corpus Christi School in Morningside Heights. [2] Later, he attended Bronx Community College, Lehman College, and Manhattan Community College. He studied writing at the City College of New York and earned two degrees in Creative Writing there: his B.A. in1975 and M.A. in 1976).[2] He had several jobs before becoming a full-time writer.

Writing career

His first novel, Our House in the Last World, was published in 1983 and received the 1985 Rome Prize, awarded by the American Academy in Rome. His second novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It was adapted for the film The Mambo Kings in 1992 and as a Broadway musical in 2005.

Teaching career

Hijuelos has taught at Hofstra University. He is a faculty member in the Department of English at Duke University.[3]

Works

Major works

  • Our House in the Last World (1983)
  • The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love (1990)
  • The Fourteen Sisters of Emilio Montez O'Brien (1993)
  • Mr. Ives' Christmas (1995)
  • Empress of the Splendid Season (1999)
  • A Simple Habana Melody (from when the world was good) (2002)
  • Dark Dude (2008)
  • Beautiful Maria of my Soul (2010)

Contributions

  • Preface, Iguana Dreams: New Latino Fiction, edited by Delia Poey and Virgil Suarez. New York, HarperPerennial, 1992.
  • Introduction, Cool Salsa: Bilingual Poems on Growing up Latino in the United States, edited by Lori M. Carlson. New York, Holt, 1994.
  • Introduction, The Cuban American Family Album by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler. New York, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  • Contributor, Best of Pushcart Press III. Pushcart, 1978.
  • Contributor, You're On!: Seven Plans in English and Spanish, edited by Lori M. Carlson. New York, Morrow Junior Books, 1999.

Notes

  1. Candelaria, Cordelia; Garcia, Peter J.; Aldama, Arturo J., Encyclopedia of Latino popular culture, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004. Cf. pp.343-345
  2. 2.0 2.1 Carlson, Lori M.; and Hijuelos, Oscar, Red Hot Salsa : Bilingual Poems on Being Young and Latino in the United States, Macmillan, 2005. ISBN 0805076166. Cf. Introduction, p.xvi. "Once, while in the fourth grade at Corpus Christi School, I received a Valentine's card that said 'I think you're cute'. ..."
  3. "Oscar Hijuelos, Professor of the Practice", Duke University, English Department faculty

External links


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