The Full Wiki

More info on Osprey class sloop

Osprey class sloop: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

HMS Gannet in her dock in Chatham 2005
HMS Gannet in her dock in Chatham, 2005
Class overview
Name: Osprey class sloops
Operators:  Royal Navy
Subclasses: Osprey and Doterel
Built: 1874–1879
In commission: 1874–1949
Completed: 14
Lost: 2
Preserved: 1 (HMS Gannet)
General characteristics
Type: Screw composite sloop
Displacement: 1,130 tons (Osprey)
1,140 tons (Doterel) [1]
Length: 170 ft (52 m)[1]
Beam: 36 ft (11 m)[1]
Draught: 15 ft (4.6 m)[1]
Propulsion: Sails and steam
Sail plan: Barque Rigged
Complement: 140
Armament:
A rifled muzzle loader in the forecastle of HMS Gannet

The Osprey class was a Royal Navy class of screw-driven sloops. They were of composite construction, with wooden hulls over an iron frame. Five ships of the class were built, designed in 1874 by the Royal Navy's Chief Constructor, William Henry White. The design was revised in 1877 and nine ships were ordered to a modified version, the Doterel class. Originally 1,130 tons displacement with 950 hp, the design was changed to 1,140 tons displacement and 1,010 hp. They were capable of approximately 11 knots and were armed with two 7" muzzle loading rifled guns on pivoting mounts, and four 64-pound guns (two on pivoting mounts, and two broadside). They had a crew complement of approximately 140 men.

Contents

Ships

Advertisements

Osprey class

Name Ship Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
HMS Wild Swan Robert Napier and Sons, Govan 14 September 1874 28 January 1876 23 August 1877 Renamed HMS Clyde in 1904 as the Royal Naval Reserve drill ship at Aberdeen. Renamed HMS Columbine in 1912. Sold for breaking up 4 May 1920
HMS Penguin Robert Napier and Sons, Govan 14 July 1874 25 March 1876 23 August 1877 Sold as a crane hulk 1924, burnt out 13 December 1960
HMS Osprey Sheerness Royal Dockyard 1875 5 August 1876 19 April 1877 Sold for breaking 29 April 1890
HMS Pelican Devonport Royal Dockyard 8 March 1875 26 April 1877 29 November 1877 Sold as a supply ship 22 January 1901
HMS Cormorant Chatham Royal Dockyard 1875 12 September 1877 2 July 1878 Harbour hulk November 1889, renamed HMS Rooke July 1946. Scrapped at Malaga in 1949

Doterel class

Name Ship Builder Laid down Launched Completed Fate
HMS Dragon Devonport Royal Dockyard 26 April 1877 30 May 1878 19 February 1879 Sold for breaking 24 September 1892
HMS Pegasus Devonport Royal Dockyard 9 May 1877 13 June 1878 5 March 1879 Sold for breaking 11 August 1892
HMS Gannet Sheerness Royal Dockyard 1877 31 August 1878 17 April 1879 Training ship 16 May 1903, renamed HMS President, then in 1913 became training ship Mercury. In 1971 was turned over to the Maritime Trust, on display in Chatham Historic Dockyard
HMS Phoenix Devonport Royal Dockyard 8 July 1878 16 September 1879 20 April 1880 Wrecked off Prince Edward Island, Canada on 12 September 1882
HMS Miranda Devonport Royal Dockyard 8 July 1878 30 September 1879 22 July 1880 Sold for breaking 24 September 1892
HMS Kingfisher Sheerness Royal Dockyard 23 September 1878 16 December 1879 17 August 1880 Training ship 10 November 1892, renamed HMS Lark, then on 18 May 1893 training ship Cruiser. Sold in 1919
HMS Doterel Chatham Royal Dockyard 13 May 1878 2 March 1880 7 December 1880 Exploded by accident and sank off Punta Arenas, Chile on 26 April 1881, with loss of 143 men
HMS Mutine Devonport Royal Dockyard 7 June 1879 20 July 1880 10 May 1881 Became boom defence vessel 1899, renamed HMS Azov in March 1904. Sold for breaking 25 August 1921
HMS Espiegle Devonport Royal Dockyard 23 September 1879 3 August 1880 11 October 1881 Became boom defence vessel 1899, renamed HMS Argo in March 1904. Sold for breaking 25 August 1921

See also

References

  • The Sail and Steam Navy List (David Lyon and Rif Winfield), Chatham Publishing, 2004. ISBN 1-86176-032-9.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message