The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Outflow (meteorology)

Outflow (meteorology): Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Outflow boundary as seen on radar reflectivity. The leading edge of the outflow is also a gust front in this particular case

Outflow, in meteorology, is air that flows outwards from a thunderstorm. Outflow tends to indicate the "health" of a system. Large quantities of outflow at the upper levels of a thunderstorm indicate it is in good health. Too much outflow in the lower levels of a thunderstorm, however, can choke off the inflow which fuels it.[1]

The "edge" of the outflow boundary can often be detected by Doppler radar (especially in clear air mode). Convergence occurs along the leading edge of the downdraft. Convergence of dust, aerosols, and bugs at the leading edge will lead to a higher clear air signature. The signature of the leading edge is also influenced by the density change between the cooler air from the downdraft and the warmer environmental air. This density boundary will increase the number of echo returns from the leading edge. Clouds, hydrometeors and new thunderstorms can also develop along the outflow's leading edge. This makes it possible to locate the outflow boundary when using precipitation mode. The image to the right depicts a particularly strong ouflow boundary ahead of a line of storms. Often, the outflow boundary will bow in the direction it is moving the quickest.[2]

Tropical cyclones

A tropical cyclone, by contrast, typically has outflow at high elevations heading outward from an upper-level anticyclone. Thus, while at low altitude air flows into the low-pressure center of the storm, at a high altitude it will flow away from a high-pressure center.

See also

References


Simple English

Outflow is a term for the air that flows away from a thunderstorm. Lots of outflow show that a storm is "healthy".[1]

The "edge" of the outflow boundary can often be detected by weather radar. Convergence occurs along the leading edge of the downdraft. Convergence of dust, aerosols, and bugs at the leading edge will lead to a higher clear air signature. The signature of the leading edge is also influenced by the density change between the cold air from the downdraft and the warm environmental air. This density boundary will increase the number of echo returns from the leading edge. Clouds, hydrometeors and new thunderstorms can also develop along the outflow's leading edge. This makes it possible to locate the outflow boundary when using precipitation mode. The image to the right depicts a particularly strong ouflow boundary ahead of a line of storms. Often, the outflow boundary will bow in the direction it is moving the quickest.[2]

References


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message